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· off the back
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15,599 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i mean, i know i'm still not experienced enough to be able to do this stuff second nature, but last year, following instructions and with a lot of help from the Park tool website, i put together my mountain bike myself.

and today, i tore down my old Specialized Sirrus, removing cranks and BB, gave the whole thing a god cleaning, and slapped it back together again. did need the park site to make sure i was good on the threading, torque specs, and which direction to be turning this stuff, but otherwise, everything went well, got it all back together, and seems to be spinning smoothly.

still not gonna mess with headset install though. some things are better left to the shop. but i feel better being able to work on just about every part of my bike myself now. and good training for when i put together my Mondonico in the future.
 

· Does it matter?
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760 Posts
Cool, great work.

Now all you have to do now is eat a ham and cheese sandwich with your greasy, grimey hands. Lay the sandwich on the work bench between bites, and not give a second thought to it. Then you'll be a real mechanic :).
 

· eminence grease
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18,559 Posts
Doesn't it feel great cutting the cord with the shop and building those skills? I remember how wonderful I felt the first time I tore a bike all the way down, had it painted and put it back together.

Don't sweat the headset though - in my opinion, if you've messed with cranks and bottom brackets, you've messed with the worst. Headsets are easy by comparison.
 

· Old, slow, and fat.
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3,897 Posts
kdub said:
How much $$$ will I need to invest on park tools in order to service a complete bike?
Not as much as you think... Any more, you really only need a few allen wrenches! Well, that and BB tools anyway. Oh, and a cable cutter. Housings you can trim with a Dremel if you so choose.

I bought my Shimano cable cutter ~19 years ago. Its just now 'needing' replacement. Meaning it ain't cutting quite as nice as it used to.

To do it 'right' a headset press and facing and chasing tools are nice, but a few beers and pizza at your LBS goes a LONG ways towards getting things done outside business hours. Till just recently, the only HS press you could get from Park was the $125 Pro version. That's a LOT of beer and pizza!!! I STILL haven't bribed my way there yet!

The things I use most in my box are the cable cutter, allen wrenches, BB tool, the occaisional cone wrench, and my spoke wrenches.

HTH,

M
 

· Resident Curmudgeon
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13,390 Posts
Good advice by everyone above. I'd consider a wheel truing stand, spoke wrenches, (they're very inexpensive - Park makes the best, IMO), and a decent workstand. The workstand'll make your life easier.
 

· No team-cest unless 8+!
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7,287 Posts
Mersault said:
Cool, great work.

Now all you have to do now is eat a ham and cheese sandwich with your greasy, grimey hands. Lay the sandwich on the work bench between bites, and not give a second thought to it. Then you'll be a real mechanic :).

Damn. I'm not a real mechanic- lol. I've been doing it for 4 years now. I wash my hands before I even go near my lunch.
 

· Does it matter?
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760 Posts

· Registered
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75 Posts
You know you're a real mechanic when you're lurking on ebay bidding on obscure tools just to add to your collection.

My latest is a shimano pedal bearing adjustment tool. Best $10 I ever spent on a tool I'll probably never use.
 
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