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I'm thinking about cycling again, probably buying a steel frame. Any opinions regarding the Cinelli SuperCorsa vs the Landshark steel frame in a standard size? Also, all the pictures of Cinelli I see appear to still have braze-ons for downtube shifters. Are all Cinellis NOS or do they still build this way? Also considering the DeRosa NeoPrimato if anyone has recent experience with this frame.
Thanks!
 

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All good choices

Sounds like you are considering some nice options. I'd have a tough time deciding between those too. Are you looking at GVH Bikes? They carry Cinelli and Landshark. I'm sure if you called them they could answer any questions about those frames. They have a special going on the Super Corsa for $2,100 built up with Campy Centaur -- looks like a pretty good deal. I think those frames are NOS, but recent enough to work with 9 or 10-speed components.
 

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Depends on what you want / like in a bike. The DeRosa is a stage race geometry bike. It's kind of a "long distance cut." It does everything well, but it's certainly not a crit bike. Handling is very responsive, but not twitchy or nervous. Ride is exceptionally smooth & comfortable. DeRosas are usually built with a fairly long top tube, which I need and like. It's a very nice bike that you can ride recreationally, do club rides, centuries, and race.
 

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Ride1 said:
Also, all the pictures of Cinelli I see appear to still have braze-ons for downtube shifters. Are all Cinellis NOS or do they still build this way?
http://cinelli.it/eng/bici/telai/corsa/2006_SUPERCORSA.html

Hit zoom. It's blends in well with the rest of the frame, but it looks to me like they still got em.

Although I feel sort of silly saying this about steel frames, I think the main difference between the Cinelli and the Landshark is the "old school" factor. If you like quill stems, 1" steel threaded forks, and downtube shifters, get the Cinelli. If you want a CF fork and like the smooth fillet brazed look, get the Landshark. The frame weights look to be pretty much the same, maybe the LandSharks use larger tubes and are slightly stiffer, I don't know. I've got a Landshark and can attest to its sweetness, and I'm sure the SuperCorsa is nice too. Perhaps one would fit you better than the other, but that's not something we can comment on.
 

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Lizzie will ride free
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These other comments are spot on. I recently put together one of the Cinellis. It's a very nice bike. I wanted to go sort of old school, so the lugs and quill stem were what I wanted. I have to say that it's not quite as well done as the old ones built by Cino himself...my bike has paint that will chip if you look at it sideways, and one of the dropouts needed to be filed to get the wheel in. Also, the work inside the bracket and fork crown was sloppy. Nothing you would ever see, but sloppy.

On the other hand, it's a fantastic ride. It is lighter and stiffer than an old SLX bike I have. Exactly what I hoped it would be. I think it is very nice looking, but that's personal. It's plenty stiff and lively for me, but depending on your style and size, there are better options with larger diameter tubing if you want stiffer. Search a while in this forum, and you will find many options and good advice.

People say great things about the Landsharks. Paint on them is killer, but I prefer lugs. I always like saying "candygram" when they ride past. I'm sure people get sick of hearing that.

I hear nothing but good things about GVH Bikes, and that sound like a good deal to me.
 

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Also, all the pictures of Cinelli I see appear to still have braze-ons for downtube shifters
Modern brake shifter (STI, Ergo) cable housing stops are designed to attach to the old downtube shifter bosses. Some frame manufacturers have done away with the old-style shifter bosses in favor of two ferrules on the headtube.

Re the Neo Primato: I had one with Columbus EL-OS tubing. Tapped the center of the top tube with my cleat during a clumsy dismount and put a big ding into it - ouch! You need to be careful around light steel frames.
 

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wim said:
Re the Neo Primato: I had one with Columbus EL-OS tubing. Tapped the center of the top tube with my cleat during a clumsy dismount and put a big ding into it - ouch! You need to be careful around light steel frames.
I agree. Same with aluminum frames. Those are made from empty Bud cans.
 

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I also have a Supercorsa I bought in the late 80s made with SL/SLX tubing. It looks exactly like the GVH Bikes except for the Neuron tubing they use now. It might be that they still produce them today for nostalgia sake. I like the little touches like fastback chrome seat stays, chrome chain stays, chrome lugs, sloping chrome shoulder steel fork. I'm sure you can have these also on custom bikes but it will surely cost you.
 

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i bought a super corsa in october from GVH as a frame set, steel fork. i think its a great ride. i transfered the components from a colnago Mix. the super corsa is heavier but i don't really notice the weight when i'm riding it. i also went to a lighter wheelset to offset the weight gain.. i to thought about going to a landshark but chose the cinelli geometry. the complete build from GVH is a good deal if you don't have something to transfer parts from. Have him build a wheelset with the lightest double butted spokes he can and you should be set.
 

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landshark

If cost isn't an issue, I would go with the Landshark for the custom geometry and paint job. You might be just fine with the Cinelli's geometry, but I would like the option of tweaking a few measurements myself. Go to the Landshark website and look at the photo pages of bikes he's built. The paint jobs are incredible, and you could choose anything from conservative retro to wildly unique. I appreciate old bikes and have a somewhat retro ride myself, but would probably search eBay and RBR classified ads for a good used bike if I wanted to go that route.
 

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Another vote for 'Shark ...

I did a lot of steel bike research prior to buying mine almost two years ago. I've bought one colnago masterlight built from GVH as well (rest his soul) and I'd buy again if the oportunity arises. I did the less than zero frame, all fillet brazed, love the paint (see my profile). I tend to keep bikes a long long time so the extra bucks were a no brainer. John is a hell of a good guy to work with (Sacha White from Vanilla cycles called him a mad scientist on a recent visit) and the thing performs like an extension of my own body. Hes going to build me a track bike as soon as I get off of my butt and get it ordered.

Speaking of Vanilla, Sacha is prob. pretty backed up right now but if you want retro his stuff is Richard Sachs sexy. Both Richard and Tom Kellogg are backed up almost to 3 years last time I checked, and some day I'll have one of each (a Kellogg track frame is a must have where I grew up near the trexlertown velodrom).

Get the Shark
 

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tarwheel2 said:
If cost isn't an issue, I would go with the Landshark for the custom geometry and paint job.
+1 Modern and custom is better than nostalgia. My last purchase was a custom, lugged modern steel bike.
 
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