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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I just had my shop do a somewhat vanity upgrade on a new bike, Norco Threshold C-105. I swapped the 105 Shift levers for Ultegra. The Ultegra shifters are much stiffer than were the 105, much stiffer than the shifters on my other bike, but that one is matched with an Ultegra FD. My wife's new bike has ultegra and shifts nicely.

The other day they had a look at it, put in a new cable, but it didn't shift much more smooth/loosely. Is there an incompatibility between the ultegra shifter lever and the 105 FD?

I looked at this-- 2016-2017 SHIMANO Product Information Web --but as near as I can tell, I shouldn't have this trouble. Should I swap out for an Ultegra FD?
 

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As far as I'm aware the 5800 levers shift easier than the 6800 levers for the front mech. It's one of the attractive points of 5800.
 

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When I used 9 speed (forgot the model #) Shimano with outer cable routing which is older model, the FD shifting was so easy and smooth. Now that I use 105 inner cable routing model, FD shifting takes double the effort to shift to big ring. :( This is one of the reasons why I'll be converting to SRAM in the near future.
 

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As far as I'm aware the 5800 levers shift easier than the 6800 levers for the front mech. It's one of the attractive points of 5800.

Really? I have found my 6800s much easier (touchier) than my older generation 5700s which were stiffer and had a longer throw.
 

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How does the cable move when it's not attached to the derailleur? Is it hanging up some where? How about the movement of the derailleur when it's not attached to the cable w/out a chain on? I would rule out the cable before buying a new derailleur.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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There can be some break-in required for a shimano fd. My DA bike had very stiff front shifting for the first 100 miles or so, now it shifts very nicely, but that was many years ago before I switched to Campy.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
 

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Was the original 105 FD a 5800 or an earlier model?

If it was an earlier model, then you may have problems because Shimano changed the design of the FD for the Ultegra 6800 (following the earlier DA changes). The 6800 FD has a different setup and more leverage to make for an easier and shorter pull at the lever.

So it would make sense if you are trying to move an older FD with the new 6800 levers it would not work.

Easy solution: put on a 5800 FD. They are cheap.
 

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Yes, and 5800 even easier.

Really? I find 6800 quite easy that I still occasionally overshift because I'm used to a stiffer, longer throw.
 

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Was the original 105 FD a 5800 or an earlier model?

If it was an earlier model, then you may have problems because Shimano changed the design of the FD for the Ultegra 6800 (following the earlier DA changes). The 6800 FD has a different setup and more leverage to make for an easier and shorter pull at the lever.

So it would make sense if you are trying to move an older FD with the new 6800 levers it would not work.

Easy solution: put on a 5800 FD. They are cheap.

Yes, previous generation shifters/derailleurs (5700, 6700) will not work properly with current generation shifters/derailleurs (5800, 6800).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I haven't checked the model number, but since it's a brand new bike, 2016 model, I'm pretty sure the FD is the latest iteration. One of the guys at the shop also mentioned a break-in period so I'm going to slog along at least until it's time for a new chain. The cost of an FD is pretty minimal, so if things don't loosen up, when I change the chain I'll probably change the FD as well.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I haven't checked the model number, but since it's a brand new bike, 2016 model, I'm pretty sure the FD is the latest iteration. One of the guys at the shop also mentioned a break-in period so I'm going to slog along at least until it's time for a new chain. The cost of an FD is pretty minimal, so if things don't loosen up, when I change the chain I'll probably change the FD as well.
Seriously...the things that crappy mechanics say blows me away. Go look at the derailleur and then tell me how it could possibly need to 'break in'.

Is the cable attached to the derailleur correctly? Is the converter in the correct orientation?
 

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Seriously...the things that crappy mechanics say blows me away. Go look at the derailleur and then tell me how it could possibly need to 'break in'.

Is the cable attached to the derailleur correctly? Is the converter in the correct orientation?
I never heard of a derailleur having to "break-in". This is total horsefeathers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
They attributed the "break in" to the grease that Shimano lubes with at the factory, being a bit heavier than need be. And while I don't pretend they are the best in the world, I don't think I'm going down the "crappy mechanics" lane. I know enough to know they're quite a lot better than I am, and I've been doing the bulk of my own work for 30 years.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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If they used the words 'break in' in any way to describe what needs to happen to your derailleur/shifter/cable/housing, they're crappy mechanics. I know people that get paid to do lots of things and do them poorly. You can do anything poorly forever if no one shows you the correct way to do it.
A properly set up bike should shift as well as it's ever going to shift as soon as you take it off the stand. 'Break in' is an excuse for not wanting to take the time to do it correctly the first time. Imagine me handing a bike over to a pro racer and saying 'It should be good to go, if not come back tomorrow and we'll check it out' at the beginning of a race. Think that would fly?
 

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To properly break in a bike, you need to ride it at varying speeds and shift lots. Then everything is broken in, do a full oil change and use premium gas, and you're good to go.
 

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They attributed the "break in" to the grease that Shimano lubes with at the factory, being a bit heavier than need be. And while I don't pretend they are the best in the world, I don't think I'm going down the "crappy mechanics" lane. I know enough to know they're quite a lot better than I am, and I've been doing the bulk of my own work for 30 years.

Grease would not make one bit of difference on a derailleur.

CX says "crappy", I prefer to use the euphemism "ill informed".

Many bike mechanics still swear that cables stretch in the first 200-300 miles and need to be fine adjusted. There seems to be a hint of truth in that as shifting often does need to be tweaked after a cable and housing change. I have to believe that is possibly the housings seating into the ferrules.

Cables themselves don't "stretch" unless strands are breaking. BTW, if you suddenly find your rear derailleur cable needs to be adjusted one full shift, it is probably about to break inside the shifter - time to replace!
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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My 7800 model FD/shifter combo did need a break-in. I'm 100% certain it did because I didn't change anything. I actually did bring it to a shop (the last time I ever went to a shop for service) and they were the ones that told me to just wait a few hundred miles. It was a very reputable shop, and they were right. I do not know whether the break in was in the shifter, the cable, or the derailleur, and I didn't understand how it would need a break-in either, but it did. If I was pressed my guess would be the FD pivots were a little tighter than desired straight from the factory.

My Campy stuff always worked perfectly from day one.
 
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