Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

· Banned
Joined
·
460 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been riding for a year and I'm finally starting to understand, feel how the bike communicates to me. I have a beginners Bianchi Via Nirone, alu-hydrocarbon. I ride primarily 30ish mile rides, moderately hilly, but consistent rolling hills. Recently, I had a bike fit and the adjustment has me really getting the power down. I was too stretched out, and too low on the seat. Anyway, at 10-12mph, when fooling around and doing 'slalom-like' motions with the bike, me seated and steering/bike leaning/turning quickly back and forth, it feels as if the rear just 'follows' me...almost trailer-like. I can replicate it. I have Mavic Kysrium Equipe wheels and they are on the bike snugly/firmly so I've ruled that out. The rear just feels spaghetti-ish. The bike can be a bit twitchy on high speed runs. I assume this because of its compact frame and my new height on the bike? :eek:

Amy I feeling frame flex? I am 5'9, 178 so I'm not overly heavy but I'm not 'light'. Any thoughts would be appreciated. I love this bike but I recently had speed wobbles during a 50mile ride on the BAT fork, which I assume is due to it's geometry. Is it just the nature of this level bike? I'm dreaming of a Cervelo but I was hoping to get another 2k miles or more out of this one. Thanks for any input.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,863 Posts
Aluminum frame with c.f. seat stays? The rear end is light. Not the best beast for descending. Try moving back to the rear of your saddle and planting your weight on the rear wheel. Bike position is about balance.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
11,555 Posts
Most likely, you haven't gotten used to your new position yet. From what you said, someone raised your saddle and reduced your reach. If these changes were large, they shifted your center of mass significantly. Ride your old saddle height for a few yards and I'm almost certain you'll find that the bike's twitchiness is gone.

I've known riders who lowered their saddle a few millimeter from the 'proper' height because sharp handling was more important to them than optimal power. That said, I'm sure you'll get used to your new position eventually.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top