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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My rear derailleur is giving me fits trying to get the indexing right. The cables are about 4 months old, maybe 1000 miles, no recent wrecks, and the derailleur does not appear to be bent. I can get the indexing right on about the 5 largest cogs, but if I shift much further toward the smaller cogs, it will shift, but will not go perfectly or quietly, and then is loud in that particular gear. Sometimes, if I go a shift past the intended gear and come back, the gear runs more quietly. If I get the indexing right on the smaller cogs, then I have similar problems on larger cogs. I've got about 12,000 miles on the bike. Could the shift lever itself be wearing out?

BTW, it's all Ultegra 10 Speed.

Thanks
 

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EMB145 Driver said:
and the derailleur does not appear to be bent. .......
Derailleur hanger can possibly be out of alignment...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll look at the hanger a little more in depth. Could the cable housing loop from the chain stay to the derailleur being a little short/smaller circle cause the same symptoms? I just had it on the stand, when going from large cogs to small, shifting was ok and fairly quiet, when going back towards large cogs, it shifted ok, but ran loudly. I'm thinking the way the symptoms have begun to present themselves, it's more likely to be cable related.
 

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Could be a few things.

As Roadfix said check hanger alignment. Considering your description that's most likely. It probably won't be visible just by "eyeing" it, you'll want to put the actual alignment tool on it. Most off the shelf (and some handbuilt from time to time) frames have this problem out of the box.

Also your high (outer) limit could be off a bit, that is the starting point for the indexing. If that limit is off, it won't ever be as crisp as possible.

The housing may be an additional factor, especially if you have the stock 4mm variety. If given the chance I always swap out for 5mm housing. I know, the mfr's literature claims the systems are designed for the 4mm, but that is with new cables and housing. Even the most finicky wrench/rider doesn't want to change it all out every couple of hundred miles. And if you consider conditions like dust in the desert SW, ocean salt on the coasts or grit from riding in or just after a rain storm it can get clogged pretty quickly. Change housing every time you change cables and change cables before shifting gets sluggish (~1-1.5k miles.) Another reason to change cables regularly with STI is that the mechanism kinks the "bullet" end inside the shifter and will break off if left in place too long. It's not fun to get it out when that happens.

Good luck,
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A riding buddy recommended a different shop to me with some good wrenches. I took it there this morning, and they looked it over me. The limit screws needed a little adjustment, but mostly it was a poor cable/housing job that was done a few months ago, at a different shop, that got progressively worse. At the time of installation, the housing had been crimped when cut, instead of a good clean cut. Additionally, the fitting at the end of the housing (where the housing and barrel adjuster meet) had never been installed. Suffice it to say, the cable was not moving properly.

The rear derailleur hanger was ever so slightly bent, but according to the mechanic, was not the cause of the problem I was having.

All in all, it was a win. I've got a new, helpful, well stocked LBS to go to, and my bicycle works like new again.
 

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Wow.

I didn't mention any of that stuff 'cause I consider it kinda like learing how to put your pants on correctly... And a shop "wrench" at that.

Well you got the best outcome of all - a properly functioning bike and a good shop to go to.

Way too cool,
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Indyfan said:
I didn't mention any of that stuff 'cause I consider it kinda like learing how to put your pants on correctly... And a shop "wrench" at that.

Well you got the best outcome of all - a properly functioning bike and a good shop to go to.

Way too cool,
Bob
That was my thought as well. This new shop is a bit of a drive, but it will be worth it for good advice and for repairs that I don't do myself.

Tom
 

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As a quick-tip: When you cut cable-housing, do so with some old cable in it. This will help prevent the housing from being crimped and causing this sort of problem. Be sure to remove the old cable when done. Even up the holes with a nail or awl. And always use professional cable-cutters made for this sort of work. This is NOT a job for the wire-cutters that came with your Radio Shack basic-wiring kit you got for Christmas 30 years ago. And add some good-grade oil into the housing before threading the cable through. Avoid grease that may solidify in changing temperatures.
 
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