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Fly on a windshield
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Yesterday afternoon the FedEx truck delivered my brand new set of R28 SL5 wheelset to my doorstep. I opened them up and was quite surprised to find these wimpy looking spokes on a set that claims to be quite sturdy.
I haven't tried them out yet so I can't judge their strength. John Neugent claims all his wheelsets are good for cyclists up to 220lbs in weight.
I weigh in at about 195lbs and the roads around here sometimes look like a section of the famous Arenberg forest (OK maybe I'm exaggerating a bit).
I would've gone with the M28 line except that they don't make them with Campy freehubs.
Have any of you rode or are riding on Neuvation wheels, R28 series and weigh around 195 lbs? Should I be worried?

Thanks
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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I only weigh 165 and I use R28 SL2s, I only trued them once after maybe a hundred miles (tightened them a bit because of creaking spokes), no problems since then for thousands of miles. I wouldn't worry because John has excellent customer service.
 

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waterproof*
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MG537 said:
John Neugent claims all his wheelsets are good for cyclists up to 220lbs in weight.
I weigh in at about 195lbs and the roads around here sometimes look like a section of the famous Arenberg forest (OK maybe I'm exaggerating a bit).
He actually says "R series: Probably good to 220 but if you are 220 pounds of muscle and are hard on wheels it might be a stretch. "

I'd say your mileage will depend on how you ride them. If you pump your 23c tires to 125 and hammer down those roads, you should expect to start breaking spokes in a thousand miles or so. Maybe less.

If you run 28's at 90 psi, save the wheels for "special" days and good roads, they could go for years without a tune-up.

They're good wheels, but physics and metallurgy have limiting factors; a heavy guy running low spoke-count wheels on rough roads is going to be near that limit.
 

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Ride them until they break...Neuvation has very good customer service.

I have a set of old R28 SL2's and a newer set of M28 Aero 2's. The M28's are proving to be a very durable and fairly fast wheel. I've used them in everything from Time Trials, to hilly road races, to lots of training rides on roads with all conditions. They are still perfectly true after about 3500 miles this year.

The R28's I purchased used and don't ride them as much. They spend time on my TT bike as training wheels. Overall, they are pretty stiff and the only real question I have with them is the freehub body since it's aluminum. At my size I pit the freehub body from the cassette putting pressure on it.

If I were to order a set or R28's these days I would see if he could put the steel freehub body on them...other than that I would trust them just fine.

For reference I'm a strong 190 - 195 pound rider...currently racing CAT 4 on the road and Expert Class off road. I'm a TT guy with a good sprint, but am not super hard on wheels...at least not to this point.
 

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"Ride them until they break...Neuvation has very good customer service"
"Should I be worried?"

The problem with riding them till they break is that you could have a serious crash. My Neuvation tacoed out and brought me to a complete skidding stop after a spoke broke. Luckily I was not on a mountain descent, group ride, or heavy traffic. I unclipped safely, but the experience caused me to promptly sell the replacements that were sent to me. I took very good care of my wheels and had them trued and tensioned checked monthly.

You should be worried. But at least they will send you a new pair !!!
 

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Fly on a windshield
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK, first ride impressions on my Neuvation R28 SL5.
I put them on my bike and went for a ride up this little hill averaging about 7.5% for a distance 1.66 km (a little more than 1 mile).
Wheels feel good, the breaking surface is smooth (riding down the hill of course). This may have something to do with the fact that they're new. Both wheels came out of the box straight as a whistle and riding the hill 4 times up and down didn't change that. Btw I still weigh 195lbs (89 kg). I do take extra care not to fall into pot holes with all my wheels.
No differences in rolling resistance between these and my Mavic Ksyrium ES. At least none that I can tell. I use Michelin Krylion Carbon tires pumped up to the max, 116psi according to their specifications for a rider my weight.
I didn't push the wheels to the max yet, meaning pedaling off my seat at 39x21 and 9 or 10% gardient. I'll probably try it this weekend.
After reading some of your posts I kinda regret not having ordered the R28 Aero which is supposed to be stronger. I guess that'll teach me for not studying the specs carefully.

Thanks all for your advice.

P.S. Next year I may order a set of wheels built up with Campy record hubs (36 holes) DT swiss rims extra strong spokes etc. from Excel Sports. That should be a wheel better suited to a rider in my weight category.
 

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Adventure Seeker
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I have my eyes on the aero 4's after seeing how the rims are the same(for the front) plus they look cooler.
Granted, it'll be quite some time before I get wheels for my ride.
 

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Scott in MD said:
Nice work, wooks, on the weight loss! That will change your life, huh?

Me:
12/1/07 - 215 pounds, BP 130 over 90
8/1/08 - 186 pounds, BP 110 over 70 (no meds)!

Happy trails.
Thanks and congrats to you as well...yes, it is life changing. I've yet been to the doctor for a check up, but I can't imagine how much has changed.

But not only do I look and feel better, I've made a lot of friends through the club and race team...which is an extra bonus.
 

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Scott in Maryland
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296 Posts
$2 per gram ??!!

You bet... BTW, make time to go get the check-up, I had the whole thing - soup to nuts - done at Hopkins to make sure everything was good-to-go, and that kind of started the better fitness thing for me. Going back for a follow-up a year later with good numbers across the board was pretty rewarding.

You know they say you can't put a price on health ... well think of it this way: In the $3K range, bike upgrades for wieght cost about 2 bucks a gram. So our ~30 pounds was worth $27,880!

Happy trails.
 

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Scott in Maryland
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296 Posts
Why don't you get some M's on the killer sale that is going on right now, and keep the R-SL's for competitive rides and climbs? I think I saw that the M3's are on sale right now for about $210 (or $260 with ceramic bearings...)

I just went the other way... I bought some M's and now I'm scratching up some $$ to pick up R-SL's on sale for my recreational tri races. I'm 6-1, and about 188 pounds.
 

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Fly on a windshield
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1,272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Scott in MD said:
Why don't you get some M's on the killer sale that is going on right now, and keep the R-SL's for competitive rides and climbs? I think I saw that the M3's are on sale right now for about $210 (or $260 with ceramic bearings...)

I just went the other way... I bought some M's and now I'm scratching up some $$ to pick up R-SL's on sale for my recreational tri races. I'm 6-1, and about 188 pounds.
Can't put Campy cassette on M's. Otherwise those would've been my 1st choice.
 
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