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Cycling induced anoesis
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evancate said:
it is a 9 speed right now, Im just wondering if it will fit onto the hub in the back
Yes, the Ultegra CS-6500 cassette is interchangable with your CS-5500 cassette. If you suspect the chain is worn, replace that as well.
 

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RoadBikeRider
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If you had a 105 9 speed cassette, the 9 speed Ultegra will fit the same but your old one is not stretched. Not sure what your problem is but a new cassette may not be the fix. WOW...lots of responses in a short time. I chimed in a bit late but chain slipping on the cassette (if all is adjusted properly) usually means worn cassette.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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If it's skipping under pressure, e.g. accelerating, climbing, you need a new cassette. The cogs of the most frequently used gears will wear & start to look like sharks teeth. Skipping usually isn't a problem unless you install a new chain. Then it becomes obvious.
 

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raymonda said:
Cassettes don't stretch they wear out. Chains stretch. I'm not sure if a 9 will fit a 8 speed hub.
Chains don't stretch, either. They wear out, so there's more space between the parts, so the chain gets longer. But nothing stretched.

Cogs can "stretch" in an analogous sense. Wear on the teeth makes the space from one tooth to the next (pitch) longer. That's why new chains skip on old cogs sometimes. The worn chain, with its longer pitch, causes matching wear on the old cog. They work together, but the new chain doesn't match.

I think that's what OP meant by "stretch."
 

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Actually, the old chain and cassette might both be fine....

OP moved parts from an older frame to a new one. If the new frame has significantly shorter chainstays, unless the chain is shortened to match it would run loose and be much more inclined to skip.

Sometimes what feels like a chain skipping actually is the freehub seriously needing service. I saw this just recently with a Mavic hub on one of my bikes. Under stronger pedalling pressure it would slip. It was some dirt and/or lack of lubrication causing the pawls to not fully extend and engage inside the hub. The fix was simple.... Pulled it apart (being careful to not lose the pawls and springs), cleaned it well and put some light oil in there. Works perfectly now and is running a lot quieter.

Other possibilities... Was the rear derailleur hanger on the new frame checked to be in alignment? If not, they are often mis-aligned on new frames, just from shipping. You can't accurately eyeball hanger alignment. Take the bike to a shop that has the tool and get it checked (the tool to check alignment and adjust it is fairly pricey... most people don't need to do this often so it's most cost effective to just give a shop a few $$$s to check it for you). Granted, the symptoms of a poorly aligned hanger are usually poor shifting, not skipping.

Another possibility is the B-screw adjustment on the rear derailleur. That's the unmarked screw up next to the point where the RD attaches to the hanger. It's likely to need adjustment when the RD is moved from one frame to another. It controls the strength of the spring in the RD that maintains tension on the chain. Not enough tension is likely to cause skipping or slipping. Too much tension would cause excessive wear. Often excessive noise is another symptom of incorrect adjustment. Turn the B-screw clockwise to increase tension and see if that helps.

Also, did you use new cables and housings when building up the new frame with the old parts? Often a kink or corrosion or wear in a cable/housing causes rear shifting issues. Poor quality cables can cause problems, too. (Personally I like to use lined housings and stainless steel cables such as Dura Ace, Jagwire L3, Sram Flak Jacket, etc.) Usual symptoms are missed shifts, difficulty keeping in adjustment, poor shifting at one extreme or the other across the cassette.

Finally, to remove the chain from one bike to put it on the other, you had to break it somewhere. Did you use a new pin to reinstall it (Shimano-style) or a good type of quick link (KMC?), either of which needs to be specifically for 9 speed chains? Was the chain cleaned and well lubed? (Personally I've been using Chain-L lube lately and really like it.... except for the strong smell.) Was the cassette cleaned?

By all means, measure the chain to see if it's worn out. Inspect the cassette teeth for heavy wear. But if they're both still within spec and usable, explore the above possibilities. If they need replacement, it's usually best to replace both at the same time. You might inspect and consider replacing the crank's chainrings, too, although the cassette usually wears faster.

Folks who ride a lot of miles sometimes keep two or three chains per bike and change them out fairly often. This allows for a good cleaning, drying and relubricating on a regular basis, and will considerably increase the useful life of both the chains and the cassette.
 

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Nope

JCavilia said:
Cogs can "stretch" in an analogous sense. Wear on the teeth makes the space from one tooth to the next (pitch) longer. That's why new chains skip on old cogs sometimes. The worn chain, with its longer pitch, causes matching wear on the old cog. They work together, but the new chain doesn't match.
No. There is no way that the pitch of the cogs can change. The "valleys" between the cogs get wider and the tops of the teeth get narrower, but the teeth are always the same distance apart. A worn chain skips on new cogs because each successive chain link rides up higher on the cog tooth and so cannot remain engaged. A new chain skips on worn cogs for the exact same reason. It has nothing to do with changes in cog pitch, because that is impossible to change unless the cog teeth wore differently, one to the next, which they obviously do not do.
 

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JCavilia said:
Chains don't stretch, either. They wear out, so there's more space between the parts, so the chain gets longer. But nothing stretched.

Cogs can "stretch" in an analogous sense. Wear on the teeth makes the space from one tooth to the next (pitch) longer. That's why new chains skip on old cogs sometimes. The worn chain, with its longer pitch, causes matching wear on the old cog. They work together, but the new chain doesn't match.

I think that's what OP meant by "stretch."

I'm sorry but you are wrong, chains do stretch.
 

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Nope

raymonda said:
I'm sorry but you are wrong, chains do stretch.
Chains elongate due to wear, but they do not stretch. Stretch would mean that the metal of the side plates was actually deforming (like when you stretch a rubber band) and that is not what happens. What happens is that there is wear where the pins pass through the plates (the holes get oval shaped), and that is what makes the chain elongate. Everyone calls it chain stretch, but that is not an accurate description of what takes place.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
Chains elongate due to wear, but they do not stretch. Stretch would mean that the metal of the side plates was actually deforming (like when you stretch a rubber band) and that is not what happens. What happens is that there is wear where the pins pass through the plates (the holes get oval shaped), and that is what makes the chain elongate. Everyone calls it chain stretch, but that is not an accurate description of what takes place.
It means it get longer. Don't be a pedant.
 

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Being precise

raymonda said:
It means it get longer. Don't be a pedant.
To an engineer, there is a big difference between saying something stretched and saying something elongated due to wear.

JCavilia explicitly stated the difference in his post, and you came back and said "I'm sorry but you are wrong, chains do stretch."

If you think that being precise is being pedantic, so be it.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
To an engineer, there is a big difference between saying something stretched and saying something elongated due to wear.

JCavilia explicitly stated the difference in his post, and you came back and said "I'm sorry but you are wrong, chains do stretch."

If you think that being precise is being pedantic, so be it.
It's longer, it's stretched. So be it.
 
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