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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, what's the word with skidding? i got a Pista, geared the chainring down to 42T and went out riding thru the neighborhood. Did some skids to see how it should be done then went home. When I was heading to the coffeeshop I got on the bike and pedaled, the gear was stipped and spinning freely. I took it to the bike shop and they were cool, chalked it up to a defective wheel and gave me a new one. They suggested that I not skid.

Is this going to do it to all hubs or is the Pista just a really cheap hub to get the bike to the $550 price point?
 

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68design said:
Ok, what's the word with skidding? i got a Pista, geared the chainring down to 42T and went out riding thru the neighborhood. Did some skids to see how it should be done then went home. When I was heading to the coffeeshop I got on the bike and pedaled, the gear was stipped and spinning freely. I took it to the bike shop and they were cool, chalked it up to a defective wheel and gave me a new one. They suggested that I not skid.

Is this going to do it to all hubs or is the Pista just a really cheap hub to get the bike to the $550 price point?

I can't imagine that skidding did that. It seems to me any forces at play in the hub during a skid would be fractions of the amount created by grunting up a non-trivial hill. I think you got a defective hub.
 

· What'd I do?
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Defective wheel, or a faulty installation. As long as the cog is threaded correctly, and the lockring is properly secured, there shoudn't be enough movement in the system to allow stripping. Skid away.
 

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mquetel said:
I think you got a defective hub.
Me too. There's no reason why locking up the back wheel should cause the threads to strip, especially with a properly-tightened lockring. My guess is that something got cross-threaded during assembly or the threads weren't cut right at the factory. If this was a common problem I think we probably would have heard about it, given the number of brakeless Pistas out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well thanks for the feedback. I just wanted to make sure before I did it again, i don't think the bike shop would be so understanding the second time around.
 

· jaded bitter joy crusher
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I don't skid my bike because I don't like buying new tires. I stripped the hub on my Pista (3 months old) while climbing a hill a couple of days ago.

I had just started up a 12% hill when I stopped moving. I was spinning the cranks but the wheel wasn't turning. At first I thought the tire was skidding on the road, but when I got off I discovered that the hub had completely stripped its threads (the cog was fine).

The LBS replaced the wheel under warranty and said there was no way the hub should have stripped like that.

Between me and you, that's two people with track hubs stripped in six months sounds like Bianchi is using inferior components.
 

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I think the problem is using cheap inferior cog on an already low quality hub. I've used low quality track hubs and never had problems when used with quality cogs like EAI, for instance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, loose lockring will do that. I bought a spanner wrench and threw it in my bag to tighted the lockring should it come loose.
 

· jaded bitter joy crusher
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Dave Hickey said:
Lock ring not completely tight would be my guess. If there is any play in the ring/cog, you run the risk of stripping. I make sure my lock ring is real tight..
Thanks for the advice. I had already bought an 18t EAI cog and it's going on the wheel this evening.

Thanks also for the advice about the lockring. I always tighten it down very hard when I change cogs but knowing the importance of keeping it tight will make me check it every week as part of my general maintenance schedule.
 

· jaded bitter joy crusher
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Shout out for my LBS (GranFondo)

Dave Hickey said:
Glad to hear the LBS is making good.
The LBS was above the call of duty here. Gran Fondo, in Nashville. www.granfondocycles.com. They're good people. They understand customer service. And they really stand behind the bikes after the sale.

With the Pista wheel, they started to tell me that I'd have to wait for them to send the wheel back to Bianchi for warranty replacement and then said, "What the heck, we've got some new Pistas in back," so they pulled a wheel off one of their new stock Pistas so I wouldn't have to wait.

They do a lot of business with custom frames and fancy bikes (IF, Tommasini, Moots, Pegoretti, and so on) but I buy simple mass-produced TIG-welded steel and they make me feel they value my business too. Even if it's been a few months since I've been in, they know my name when I walk into the store and they take good care of me. Anyone riding in the Nashville are should check them out.
 

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The problem isnt the loc-ring. Its the sproket.

We had this on 3 KHS's my shop sold. The sprokets are cheap junk with poor threads. You can tell because even new they thread on stiff. Meaning they chase the thread. Conbine that with also not being properly tightened before the loc ring is installed and your asking for it.

Rule #1 for cheap track bikes. Buy a better sproket right away.
 

· jaded bitter joy crusher
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Follow-up report:

I put an EAI cog on the replacement wheel yesterday. Here's what I found. Both the cog and lockring installed by the factory were somewhat loose. I just touched the spanner and the lockring came off with no substantial torque. I was able to unscrew the cog with my fingers and no chain whip.

The threads on the hub were poorly cut. Running my finger over them they were uneven and there were sharp edges suggesting, as Jamie says, that the cog had chased them with an uneven fit.

Greased the threads, put on the EAI, and tightened the crap out of it with a chain whip, figuring that there's no way I can put anywhere near as much torque on with my arm as I can with the pedals and my legs. Then I put on the lock-ring, which is labeled for 30 ft-lbs of torque. I was using a spanner, not a torque wrench (does anyone even make a socket attachment for lock rings?) so I estimated 60 lbs at the end of a six-inch spanner.

Now I'm gonna check the cog and lockring tightness weekly.

It's nice to have my ride back. I've been riding a derailleur bike for the last five days and missed the fixte.

Thanks to all you knowledgeable folk for your helpful advice.
 

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When you buy a budget track bike from a shop ask if you can upgrade the sproket right away.The Log ring isnt worth upgrading. My shop now just atomaticly switches it when we build it. EAI and Dura-Ace sprokets are top notch and tottaly worth spending the extra $10 on top of your bike to get.

If your a do-it yourselfer like above stated, grease it, tighten it down and away you go. You do not need to tighten the crap out of it. 99% of sprinters never use a loc ring and dont have to crank a cog on thhhhhhhaaat tight. Even when we street train.
 
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