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Forgive me if this has been answered previously. But, what's a good solid wheelset for a 235 lb rider? I'm not looking for a strong set that will hold up to potholes, bad touring conditions, etc. Rather, a strong wheel (primarily rear) that doesn't flex under high torque. Perhaps both conditions are satisfied by the same wheel design/build, but I'm more interested in the latter.

Thanks!
 

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Standard answer

cornboy said:
Forgive me if this has been answered previously. But, what's a good solid wheelset for a 235 lb rider? I'm not looking for a strong set that will hold up to potholes, bad touring conditions, etc. Rather, a strong wheel (primarily rear) that doesn't flex under high torque. Perhaps both conditions are satisfied by the same wheel design/build, but I'm more interested in the latter.
If it were me, I would find a good builder and get either a standard rim (Velocity Aerohead, MAVIC OpenPro) 36 spoke or a deep section rim (Velocity DeepV, MAVIC CXP 33) 32 spoke. These might be overkill, but so what - better that than underkill :) On the hub of your choice, a good builder can put together a very competent wheel with 14/15 butted spokes and a 3X pattern. Such a wheel would be anywhere from $100 to a few $100 cheaper that a factory wheel of comparable durability. And yes, this has been discussed before and you can use the search function to look it up.
 

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I have a wheel set that was built for me at Excel sports a couple months ago that has worked well for me for >1000 miles so far. Mavic Open pro CD 28 hole 14/15 spokes laced 3x to a Ultegra hub - I'm currently in the ~230lb range and can easily flex most frames and machine built wheels under high torque, especially med-high speed sprints. So far I haven't noticed these wheels flexing - so either they are very strong, or may last several sets of wheels were very week so its not noticable in comparison. If it is going to be a commuting style wheel where the potholes may be an issue then a 32 spoke may be better.
 

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I am 200, have taken 36 spoke Mavic CXP 33 from good (suppoisdly) wheelbuilder.
After 600 miles rear wheel severely come out of true. No crashes, no major potholes :mad2: .



Kerry Irons said:
If it were me, I would find a good builder and get either a standard rim (Velocity Aerohead, MAVIC OpenPro) 36 spoke or a deep section rim (Velocity DeepV, MAVIC CXP 33) 32 spoke. These might be overkill, but so what - better that than underkill :) On the hub of your choice, a good builder can put together a very competent wheel with 14/15 butted spokes and a 3X pattern. Such a wheel would be anywhere from $100 to a few $100 cheaper that a factory wheel of comparable durability. And yes, this has been discussed before and you can use the search function to look it up.
 

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As usual everyone will recommend small wheel builders, and I say ignore them.

Ksyrium SSC SL are the way for you to go. The high tension radial/2 cross rear with stainless bladed spokes will not flex the way a standard 3 cross set up will and they will handle the torque more efficiently.
 

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ewitz said:
Ksyrium SSC SL are the way for you to go. The high tension radial/2 cross rear with stainless bladed spokes will not flex the way a standard 3 cross set up will and they will handle the torque more efficiently.
Since when did Ksyrium SSCs use stainless spokes? They are ALUMINUM. You are right about them not flexing the same as a normal 3x wheel... in fact they flex a lot MORE!

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/wheel/data.htm
 

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ewitz said:
As usual everyone will recommend small wheel builders, and I say ignore them.

Ksyrium SSC SL are the way for you to go. The high tension radial/2 cross rear with stainless bladed spokes will not flex the way a standard 3 cross set up will and they will handle the torque more efficiently.
Do you by chance have the tension in kgf they use or are you regurgitating market hype? Even if you fit the “ideal” rider for Ksyriums, you can still have a better set of wheels for less elsewhere. If they are given to you from a sponsor or they came with the bike, then ride away. They are not horrible wheels. Otherwise, buy what works, not what is hyped and overpriced.

-Eric
 

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rruff said:
Since when did Ksyrium SSCs use stainless spokes? They are ALUMINUM. You are right about them not flexing the same as a normal 3x wheel... in fact they flex a lot MORE!

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/wheel/data.htm
Yup, the "ksyriums are uber stiff" crowd is always good for a giggle. Laterally, they're definitely not anywhere near the head of the class. Maybe their decals are stiffer than the decals of other brands. And FWIW, 3x will more likely provide less windup in wheels with spoke number appropriate for 3x. Radial spokes are a non-starter when it comes to windup.
 

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cornboy said:
Rather, a strong wheel (primarily rear) that doesn't flex under high torque.
What sort of flex are you worried about? If it is rotational flex (the kind that is effected by high torque), then a high flange hub with plenty of tangential spokes would do the trick... but that probably isn't a valid concern. Lateral flex isn't important either... but a stiff rim, and plenty of heavy spokes would be the best there.

I think the biggest problem is when things flex enough for spokes to go slack. To prevent that you want a stiff rim and plenty of *light* spokes... like the build ruly62 recommended.
 

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Efficient torque transfer of wheels

ewitz said:
As usual everyone will recommend small wheel builders, and I say ignore them.

Ksyrium SSC SL are the way for you to go. The high tension radial/2 cross rear with stainless bladed spokes will not flex the way a standard 3 cross set up will and they will handle the torque more efficiently.
Can you name any single wheel which doesn't handle torque efficiently? Even under the largest pedaling load, any wheel with crossed spokes will have a torsional flex ("wind-up") so minute it is undetectable. There is no need to worry about wind-up in any bicycle wheel.
 
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