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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is going to be an employment question so I guess i'll start with some of the details:

I am one of the few, the lucky even, who was able to graduate college in 2009 and walk right into a job. I had the fortune to land an internship my junior year and was able to ride that out right into a "real person" job. The only bad news is, I just don't like it.

I graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Business Administration concentrating in Finance. I don't feel like that leaves me too many options, either I work with numbers, or I work with other numbers. Currently my position is a "Financial Analyst". It sounds very powerful but if the job description was more accurate I would be "King of Pivot Tables".

Now I've been in this position for about a year and i'm feeling that its time for a change. I'm still young (23) and have been tossing around the idea of going to Law School (my minor was in Legal Studies, my minor GPA was also a full point higher than my major GPA :confused:) So I have a series of questions buried in this rambling post.

1- Is 1 year of real experience backed by a year of internship experience enough to move to another position?

B- Will I get stuck in the world of Finance the longer I stay in this position? (I wouldn't mind checking out other aspects of business, for instance I might make a hell of a salesman!)

I have put out about 20+ resumes online over the last month or two (definetly the lazy approach) and have heard back from literally nobody. Should I just HTFU? Yeah, probably.

-Bill
 

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my legs hurt
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finance industry will suck you in, you'll figure you'll stick it out for a year, then you get a raise, then you realize that if you go to another job, you'll have to take a pay cut, so you stick it out for another year, and pretty soon, its 10 yrs later, you stil hate your job but your life has been built around a salary level and your stuck.

You're 23, find out what you actually like to do, and then do it, but law school is not like pre-law studies...by a long shot. I'll let the lawyers pipe-in, but law school is unlike any educational experience you've done so far, from what I hear (wife is lawyer.)

You are not getting any bites on your resume because well...you have no experience. In todays economy you are competing against others with 10 + yrs actual analyst experience...so you're getting shafted.
Plus 20 resumes is not that much, I have friends that have sent out hundreds of resumes, and only get a few interviews.

If you plan on sticking around int he finance industry, look into CFA/FRM or another certification to get you some additional credentials.
 

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waterproof*
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It's never that simple. Take your boss to lunch, say, hey boss, I've been here a year, how am I doing and where do you think I can go next? Set your ego aside and really listen - if s/he's a good boss you'll get some good advice.

Look before you leap. Show up at the meetings / networking events that pertain to areas you're interested in trying. Talk to the people actually doing those jobs to find out what they are like... sales for example, can be a great job but they are not all the same; you might excel at one and suck/hate another.
 

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Sticky Valentine
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Lately I've been entertaining the idea of going to law school. If I didn't have a mountain of student loan debt already I might.

I can tell you this: I finished my BA and had no prospect of getting a job I felt I could tolerate. So I went to grad school. Luckily my department loved me and I was allowed in to the program way after the admit date.

So I wandered through grad school. It was great. I would be an MA student the rest of my life if I could.

I landed my current job as an academic advisor at a university by chance: I was working as an advisor at my school in a graduate assistantship. My supervisor there quit and got hired at a different university to start up their advising center and, after a couple of months of flailing outside of grad school working at Trader Joe's, she called me and told me to apply. I was brought in here and have helped build the current advising center from the ground up.

It's been great experience and we've come a long way in the nearly three years that I've been here. But I'm getting bored. It's not all that challenging. I don't get to use my mind as much as I was before and I feel like I am losing the perspective I had gained about myself and the world in general because I am not being challenged and am getting lazy mentally.

But I'm here. In a job that gets the bills paid but doesn't allow for me to live on my own. I'm still paycheck to paycheck. I'm kind of stuck.

There was a line in Malcolm in the Middle from a while back that stuck with me. The kid asked the mom how much he'd be making at his new job and she said "Not enough to get ahead and just enough to keep you coming back."

Don't get pinned down. If you're free of debt and have the ability and the support network to take a chance on yourself and do something great, go for it. I feel like I've missed a lot of my own opportunities because I was too fearful. I'm 28 and already have regrets about what I'm doing. Hopefully one of these days I'll get the balls to do something about it and can try and pull myself out of this feeling of comfort that having a "real" job gives me and be able to realize what I believe to be maybe not my full potential, but at least a higher potential. Some place I can be really happy with what I'm doing and not feeling like I'm just punching in every day (in more ways than one).


joe
 

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Meow!
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I'd think twice before going to law school right now. At least in my neck of the woods, the market is flooded with recent grads who can't work. Firm are firing experienced attorneys and suspending their hiring and internship programs. Even if the market improves in the near future, it's going to take a while before all the current grads are absorbed. Of course, YMMV.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/26/business/26lawyers.html?_r=1&pagewanted=1&em
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
About 6 months ago I had the opportunity to take a job in the cycling industry (sales in particular), the only reason I didn't take it was because of the drastic salary cut.

These are all great points, Law School would definetly be tough, NY is one of the markets I would be looking at. I may as well just start buying lottery tickets.


/I think its at 111 million today!
 

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2 busy workin' 2 hang out
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naturaldub said:
This is going to be an employment question so I guess i'll start with some of the details:

I am one of the few, the lucky even, who was able to graduate college in 2009 and walk right into a job. I had the fortune to land an internship my junior year and was able to ride that out right into a "real person" job. The only bad news is, I just don't like it.

I graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Business Administration concentrating in Finance. I don't feel like that leaves me too many options, either I work with numbers, or I work with other numbers. Currently my position is a "Financial Analyst". It sounds very powerful but if the job description was more accurate I would be "King of Pivot Tables".

Now I've been in this position for about a year and i'm feeling that its time for a change. I'm still young (23) and have been tossing around the idea of going to Law School (my minor was in Legal Studies, my minor GPA was also a full point higher than my major GPA :confused:) So I have a series of questions buried in this rambling post.

1- Is 1 year of real experience backed by a year of internship experience enough to move to another position?

B- Will I get stuck in the world of Finance the longer I stay in this position? (I wouldn't mind checking out other aspects of business, for instance I might make a hell of a salesman!)

I have put out about 20+ resumes online over the last month or two (definetly the lazy approach) and have heard back from literally nobody. Should I just HTFU? Yeah, probably.

-Bill
1) Historically no but these days it doesn't seem to matter from what I've seen.
2) Depends. Most people do and essentially give up on professional life. I lasted two years in corporate insurance before I decided that some people do what they want in life. And then, why not me? So, I quit, did some pre-med classes and now med school. However, many of my former co-workers are still in the job and really don't like it but are too scared to leave.
 

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Enlist in the Air Force


See the world and take a few years to figure out what you really want to do.
 

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la dolce vita
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Focus on what you can do as an individual, not how you would be just a piece in the corporate puzzle. When I started my business 15 years ago, I was scared ****less, but now I wouldn't have it any other way. Be somebody, do something, don't just fill a role.
Easily said, I know, but oh so rewarding.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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Too short term focused IMO

First off, finance is the language of business......if you want to do s omething anywhere in the business world, time in finance will give you a leg up.

At 23, you should be all about experiences that contribute to where you want to go. So where do you want to be in 10 years? Don't know do you.?

If you don't know where you want to get to, than anything you do is no better or worse than anything else.

Based on what I know now, if I was you, I would spend a lot of time getting to know me and my own tendencies. I'd get personality testing done and then mirror what things I do well with various occupations....then I'd figure out how to find one of those that fit me better. Most people do it the other way around.

Good luck

Len
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Len J said:
Too short term focused IMO

First off, finance is the language of business......if you want to do s omething anywhere in the business world, time in finance will give you a leg up.

At 23, you should be all about experiences that contribute to where you want to go. So where do you want to be in 10 years? Don't know do you.?

If you don't know where you want to get to, than anything you do is no better or worse than anything else.

Based on what I know now, if I was you, I would spend a lot of time getting to know me and my own tendencies. I'd get personality testing done and then mirror what things I do well with various occupations....then I'd figure out how to find one of those that fit me better. Most people do it the other way around.

Good luck

Len
Len you posted what is essentially my entire problem. I have no idea what I want to do or where I want to be. I have taken the personality tests in college and unfortunately I took them my junior year (too deep in course work to really change anything). My highest scores were in the forest industry haha.

If I had to compare my life with someone fictional I would call myself Peter Gibbons. If I had a million dollars I would do nothing. Now to sway from my point I have a great work ethic, but I just have no idea what I want to do, so right now I have decided I need to focus all my efforts on that question. What do you want to do. 23 might be young to think like this but I want to raise and support a family. In my mind that is the best thing that a man can do in his life. If I can do that, it doesn't much matter what I do to make it happen but obviously everyone will be better off if I am happy doing whatever that is.

that was a good late night ramble I think :D
 

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ARP said:

See the world and take a few years to figure out what you really want to do.

DO NOT enlist.

You have a degree--you can enter as an Officer in any of the services. (Better pay, better perks, higher rank, etc)

And by all means give it a thought. Being an officer will give you more responsibility and management of people in the first 4 years than you will get in 20 years in the job you're in.
 

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Destroyer of Motorcycles
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wagsea6b said:
DO NOT enlist.

You have a degree--you can enter as an Officer in any of the services. (Better pay, better perks, higher rank, etc)

And by all means give it a thought. Being an officer will give you more responsibility and management of people in the first 4 years than you will get in 20 years in the job you're in.
+1 on the military. They are always hiring and going in as an officer pays quite well. An O1 (2nd Lt) pays about 60k/year (including all pay and allowances). After a few years as a non-rated officer (promoted to Major), you'd be making around 80-90k/year.

Also don't discount joining the National Guard (no moving around, don't deploy as much) with many of the same benefits.
 

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Of course that is what I was refering to

wagsea6b said:
DO NOT enlist.

You have a degree--you can enter as an Officer in any of the services. (Better pay, better perks, higher rank, etc)

And by all means give it a thought. Being an officer will give you more responsibility and management of people in the first 4 years than you will get in 20 years in the job you're in.
going in as a 2nd loowey.
 

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Good for you!
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ARP said:
going in as a 2nd loowey.
Gotcha. Just want to make sure he knows the distinction between "enlisting" and "receiving a commission." Say the wrong thing to a recruiter and you could find youself scrubbing toilets.
 

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Boobies!
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Best of the Lawnj in a post like this, & lots of great advice, especially from Len and Creaky, really presenting the two best ways of figuring out the answers to your questions.

Creaky is telling you that you are already placed in an industry--so put in the time to figure out what the possibilities are--I would add that you should make an effort to talk to some folks that are higher up the food chain and ask them what steps they took to get there--

Len says "know thyself"--it's an old adage. FWIW, you can't answer questions about what makes you happy in the abstract. Tests etc are a guide--but you need to do some archeology of yourself--in the absence of a better starting point, get a copy of What Color is my Parachute and actually work diligently through the exercises:
  • When or what was I doing when I felt the most happy or most complete?
  • What were the specific things I was doing at the time?
  • What would be a career in which I would get a chance to do more of X?

Maybe forestry is not it--but something in your answers (working outdoors, in nature, who knows?) skewed your test results that way, so don't dismiss it out of hand, but treat is as another clue...

I think the law is a profession filled with smart people and a great number of them spend their days dreaming about doing something else--hence the rush to invest in B&Bs or vineyards when the mid-life crisis hits...
 

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Your lack of long term thinking regarding your life is a problem everyone (for the most part) at your age has. You've just gotten through being the most self centered a human can be (teenage years), finished college, and now you've come to realize that wasn't necessarily the best way to go about things. Finding out what you want to do for the rest of your life is difficult if you've allowed yourself the options available to those with a BS or BA degree. Take some time, find out who you are, what you like to do that you can love doing the rest of your life, and move on when the time comes.

As for finding out what you want to do, why rush it? You have 40+ years left of working to do, and you aren't all that close to 30, where you should be settling down a bit. If you don't like your job, find another one. Stop being lazy about it though, since that basically makes you seem somewhat insincere. You can always relocate. That will give you an entirely different experience altogether.
 

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gazing from the shadows
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naturaldub said:
Len you posted what is essentially my entire problem. I have no idea what I want to do or where I want to be.
Know thyself.

What do you like? Not job wise, but hobby wise? What classes did you enjoy most outside of your finance classes? What sounds like interesting work to you, something where you work in isolation, or as part of a team, or with lots of contact with people every day?

You might be able to find a way to use your degree in a more personally rewarding way. For example, lots of non-profits need finance people to do their work. If you think about your number crunching as number crunching, it's not going to be exciting. But if you think about it as "If I work these numbers out the new community center can expand" it might make it more meaningful for you. A job with a city might seem boring, but what if you are involved in helping to improve the cycling infrastructure? If you like movies, you might be able to hook up with a production company, dealing with financing of film projects. If you liked school, colleges need people to crunch the numbers to do short and long term planning. That might still be boring, but put you in a location where all the other parts of your life are to your liking.

So there are ways to keep using your degree, there might be some options in that direction.

If you want to bail on the number crunching, that will be a less direct path. Still, you can do it. But until you have some idea of where you want to be in a few years, and a few decades, it will be impossible to pick a path, much less follow one.
 
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