Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Adventure Seeker
Joined
·
5,115 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got one of those patch kits at wally world, since the only time I could make it to my LBS is after hours. Instead of glue and patches/innertube, it has these round stickers. They appear to be vinyl or something. Has anyone had any experience with these? They just seem too thin to be of good use on a road bike tire.
 

·
I didn't even own a cat..
Joined
·
594 Posts
I have it. It seems to work okay but the problem is that my tube has multiple holes from the rim tape being bad. The patches stick very well compared to my other patch kit with glue. The glue is either old or just not sticking. I'm going to continue to try it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,639 Posts
Self stick patch

Peanya said:
I got one of those patch kits at wally world, since the only time I could make it to my LBS is after hours. Instead of glue and patches/innertube, it has these round stickers. They appear to be vinyl or something. Has anyone had any experience with these? They just seem too thin to be of good use on a road bike tire.
While some people use self-adhesive patches as a permanent patch, most people just use them as a "get back home" patch when they have a second flat and only one spare tube. Park makes a good "instant patch" that is available in most bike stores. I would not trust something from WalMart for one minute. But that's just me :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
FWIW, my failure rate with old-school glueless patches (a few years ago; they may have improved) is about 50 percent. In more than 30 years as an adult cyclist, certainly hundreds of flats, I've had only two conventional patches fail, and one of those was my fault. With glueless on road tires, probably six or seven out of 10 have blown off. On MB tires (lower pressure), it's probably two or three.
As for the "get home" use Kerry mentioned, I know that's common, but it doesn't make much sense to me. They save, what, a minute or two per flat, and then you have to replace them with real patches later? Not worth the hassle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,452 Posts
worthless

Peanya said:
I got one of those patch kits at wally world, since the only time I could make it to my LBS is after hours. Instead of glue and patches/innertube, it has these round stickers. They appear to be vinyl or something. Has anyone had any experience with these? They just seem too thin to be of good use on a road bike tire.
I bought a pack of Slime brand "Scabs" at Wal-mart. They were completely worthless. Next to impossible to remove them from the backing without stretching and distorting them. I used them on two different flats with the same results: complete patch failure. I have used the Park brand glueless patches with some success. I'd only use these in an on-the-road situation.
At home I always use Rema "Tip Top" patches with glue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
I use glueless patches just to get me home. I pack two spare tubes and I seldom (if ever) have more than one flat. All the glueless patches (I use Park) have come off after a month or so. Just go online and buy a bunch of patch kits, think I bought ten last time.

It's easier to pack two tubes. One in my middle jersey pocket and the other in my seat bag. The more stuff you pack to avoid flats, the least apt you are to have them. Murphy's Law.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69,526 Posts
I tried both kinds of patches and the glueless left me hitchhiking. After a couple of failures with glued patches I just gave up altogether and started carrying two new tubes with me on a ride and I just throw the holed ones away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have had no luck with the scabs, but.. if all you have is walmart, skip the toy section where you found those and go on back to the tire and automotive section. There you can find standard automotive patches which are a little big, but work great. Also valve stems and a few other bits and pieces. Or the automotive parts stores if yo dont want to give w-mart your money.
 

·
I didn't even own a cat..
Joined
·
594 Posts
fox_boy said:
I have had no luck with the scabs, but.. if all you have is walmart, skip the toy section where you found those and go on back to the tire and automotive section. There you can find standard automotive patches which are a little big, but work great. Also valve stems and a few other bits and pieces. Or the automotive parts stores if yo dont want to give w-mart your money.
That is pretty novel. I've not thought of a tire patch. I like the fact you have a large patch. I still think that it is in the adhesive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69,526 Posts
Jesse D Smith said:
Now is that any way to celebrate Earth Day?
Me, I celebrated by soiling myself.
Well, I'm not all that green minded and I got tired of trying to stick those patches on those skinny tubes, usually with a seam running down the middle of it. I tried the auto dept ones and the bicycle ones and the glueless. New tubes work best. I don't just chunk 'em where they flat, I bring 'em home to throw 'em away. What happened, get scared when all the lights went out? :)
 

·
Does it matter?
Joined
·
751 Posts
Dinosaur It's easier to pack two tubes. One in my middle jersey pocket and the other in my seat bag. The more stuff you pack to avoid flats said:
I carry two tubes as well, on in my seat bag, and one underneath my saddle and wedged in between the rails. I expel all the air in the tube, and fold it up well, cover the tube in a plastic bag, and then use an old black sock to hold and pull the tube forward, the extra part of the sock gets attached to the seat bag. I used to carry the tube in my jersey pocked, but I prefer this method. And I can't fit two tubes in my saddle bag, only one with multi-tool and levers. I think only once I got two flats in a ride. I don't carry a patch kit, I just bring the tube home and repair it with a rema tip-top patch that I bought in bulk.
 

·
Integrated Cyclist
Joined
·
95 Posts
Bring a spare tube. In fact, bring two. Patch punctures at home with something permanent. If you do a lot of cycling, I suggest going to your LBS and buying a box of Rema patches (100 per box). Those little patch kits are a ripoff. Then just buy a large bottle of glue and some sandpaper.

That should keep you going for 4-5 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,639 Posts
Oh come on

Snakebit said:
I got tired of trying to stick those patches on those skinny tubes, usually with a seam running down the middle of it.
I just wonder whether to take this seriously! Virtually every patch kit comes with sandpaper if you have to smooth out that ridge. They teach Boy Scouts to patch tubes, and they can handle it. This reminds me of a guy I used to know who "didn't like using (bank) checks" because he "had problems with them." I always knew where the problem was, and it wasn't with the bank. Get real! :)
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,980 Posts
I've never had good luck with glueles patches. I try to buy patch kits that have only small round patches. IME, the larger patches are are useless on small road tubes. When I buy tubes I never buy latex or ultra light tubes.
 

·
Matnlely Dregaend
Joined
·
4,937 Posts
When new the instant "glueless" patches work very well assuming you prepare (clean) the rubber properly before application. The problem is they dry out after 6-9 months after which point they'll still stick, but won't hold air. They need to sell them in an airtight individual patch package. I abandoned them after they dried out and I now carry a regular patch kit and a spare tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,452 Posts
small sacrifices

Snakebit said:
. What happened, get scared when all the lights went out? :)
That's funny.
Nope, just keepin' it real. The Walmart where I work announced it's Earth Month. This could get messy.
The irony is that Walmart is celebrating Earth Month by selling all these "green" cleaning products designed to remove any hint of the earth that may be soiling your synthetic fabrics. And I'm hearing how some employees celebrated the "green hour" by burning oil lamps and turning off all the electricity. Can't wait to see our cities looking as green as 19th century London. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69,526 Posts
Kerry Irons said:
I just wonder whether to take this seriously! Virtually every patch kit comes with sandpaper if you have to smooth out that ridge. They teach Boy Scouts to patch tubes, and they can handle it. This reminds me of a guy I used to know who "didn't like using (bank) checks" because he "had problems with them." I always knew where the problem was, and it wasn't with the bank. Get real! :)
I did. I really prefer new tubes so I don't have to walk home from wherever. That's pretty real. Oh, and I have patched tubes since my first bike as a kid but I ain't a kid anymore and can aford to be safe rather than sorry. :)

Another trick when I was a kid was to use condensed milk in the tubes for stop leak. Ever try that one? :)
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top