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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to get a set of spare wheels (tubulars) but I don't want to have to shell out like $800.00. Anyone know of any decent tubular wheelsets/rims? Something not too heavy would be nice and around the price of say $400.00 for a wheelset.

I'd love to have a pair of the Zipp Carbons (any of 'em) but that's far too much than I could ever justify (still...).

Thanks!

KRider
 

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hi, I'm Larry
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Check ebay

There are some great deals on ebay for tubular "race only" wheelset. If you are capable of doing a hub changeout you can get a set with a freewheel rear for less than $100 for a set with lightweight rims. I have also seen aero tubular sets go for less than $200. Here the hub change outs are more complicated, You may be able to find compatible hubs on ebay or elsewhere or change out freehubs if they are cassette type. I leave my bike Campy 8 speed so that I can get high end wheels dirt cheap. My next bargain will be to get a Carbon tubular rear freewheel disk and put an 8 speed freewheel on it and then get a used HED TriSpoke front. I've seen these old disks go for $100.
 

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Old, slow, and fat.
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Buy used

KRider said:
I'd like to get a set of spare wheels (tubulars) but I don't want to have to shell out like $800.00. Anyone know of any decent tubular wheelsets/rims? Something not too heavy would be nice and around the price of say $400.00 for a wheelset.

I'd love to have a pair of the Zipp Carbons (any of 'em) but that's far too much than I could ever justify (still...).

Thanks!

KRider
Tubulars are falling further and further out of favor. I just picked up a pair of semi-used (by a triathlete...) Zipp 404s for $450. Right over your budget, but hey! half price is always good.

Surf on over to your local Tri Club and start asking around. Most of the triathletes I know 1. don't ride their stuff too hard, and 2. sell off their stuff for cheap.

Failing that, check out the ads here, the rec.bicycles.marketplace newsgroup, etc. Ebay may be a way to go as long as you're not looking for Zipps 'cause they end up going for a bunch of money...

I've accumulated a stash of GL330s over the years. Most were bought for not much. I think the last pair I bought were $40.

In recent years, tubular rims have gone heavy. Reflex tubulars are right at 400g. IMO too heavy for a tubular rim. What's the point if you're going to have a wheel that weighs about what a clincher does?

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's my thought exactly...

MShaw said:
Tubulars are falling further and further out of favor. I just picked up a pair of semi-used (by a triathlete...) Zipp 404s for $450. Right over your budget, but hey! half price is always good.

Surf on over to your local Tri Club and start asking around. Most of the triathletes I know 1. don't ride their stuff too hard, and 2. sell off their stuff for cheap.

Failing that, check out the ads here, the rec.bicycles.marketplace newsgroup, etc. Ebay may be a way to go as long as you're not looking for Zipps 'cause they end up going for a bunch of money...

I've accumulated a stash of GL330s over the years. Most were bought for not much. I think the last pair I bought were $40.

In recent years, tubular rims have gone heavy. Reflex tubulars are right at 400g. IMO too heavy for a tubular rim. What's the point if you're going to have a wheel that weighs about what a clincher does?

Mike

I don't see a point in using a tubular set unless it is significantly lighter than a clincher set. Which is what has drawn me to the Zipps.

I'll cruise ebay and the marketplace to see what I can find. Also check out the LBS to see if they can help in any way.

Thanks for the replies!

KRider
 

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Some options and opinions on sewups

KRider said:
I don't see a point in using a tubular set unless it is significantly lighter than a clincher set. Which is what has drawn me to the Zipps.

I'll cruise ebay and the marketplace to see what I can find. Also check out the LBS to see if they can help in any way.

Thanks for the replies!

KRider
Sewup wheels go for cheap on e-bay, and a bicycle swap meets. That's because newer roadies seem to be way more scared of tubulars that is warranted. In a word, sewups rock. They ride better, corner better, and are easier to replace by the roadside. (all IMHO, of course) They are harder to patch, but it's not like trying to perform major abdominal surgery. Save up your flatted tires, and then, in the winter, grab a sixxer of something dark, put on "A Sunday in Hell" or "Stars and Watercarriers", and patch 'em all. Or send them to TireAlert, and get new tubes, stiching, and base tape for $15 a tire.

If your LBS has a Euro-Asia account, you can order up a set of NOS Mavic GL-330s or GEL-280s. Depending on hubs and spokes, you'll end up with a wheelset that weighs between 1200 and 1400 grams. 280's with stupid-light hubs and DT revos or Sapim CX-rays can get into the mid / uper 1100s. If you're under 150 - 160 pounds, you can go with the 280's front and rear. 160 - 180, try 280 front / 330 rear. Over two bills, like me? 330s are pretty light for you. I'm on Mavic GP4s (395) or Saturnes (Made by Ambrosio for Specialized, around 330 - 350, IIRC).

For new production, Sun M19II's are claimed at 370 g, Damon Rinard has weighed samples from 340 - 360. Sounds like they are quoting the weight if the rims are extruded on old dies, which is what everyone should do. I have no experience with this rim.

For tires, go with a 250 - 300 gram training tire. A lot of people complain about the Vittoria Rallys, and I understand why, but they are way, way better than cheap sewups were 15 years ago. And at 23 mm and 90 / 95 psi, they just kill any 23 or 25 mm clincher I've ever owned, regardless of price. They do take about 75 - 100 miles to round out the little lumps, but a local shop guy just suggested to ride 'em for about 10 miles at 65 - 70 psi, so I'll try that next time. 20 bucks at any Performance bike shop, probably less on line.

Conti Sprinter 250s can be had on the 'net for 30 bucks, and Conti Giros for 20. Yellow Jersey has the 20 dollar Clements, that I've heard good things about, but I don't like black sidewalls on road tires. Gommitalia Champions have gotten some good words, about 20 - 25 bucks at AEBike or AirBomb.

If you really want to go all out, there's the Andre Dugast silks, at about $150 - $170. He even makes a 27mm that I'll probably put on my Rivendell.

--Shannon, thinking about the ride of a 27 mm handmade silk....
 

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Don't forget the Tufos...

tube_ee said:
Sewup wheels go for cheap on e-bay, and a bicycle swap meets. That's because newer roadies seem to be way more scared of tubulars that is warranted. In a word, sewups rock. They ride better, corner better, and are easier to replace by the roadside. (all IMHO, of course) They are harder to patch, but it's not like trying to perform major abdominal surgery. Save up your flatted tires, and then, in the winter, grab a sixxer of something dark, put on "A Sunday in Hell" or "Stars and Watercarriers", and patch 'em all. Or send them to TireAlert, and get new tubes, stiching, and base tape for $15 a tire.

If your LBS has a Euro-Asia account, you can order up a set of NOS Mavic GL-330s or GEL-280s. Depending on hubs and spokes, you'll end up with a wheelset that weighs between 1200 and 1400 grams. 280's with stupid-light hubs and DT revos or Sapim CX-rays can get into the mid / uper 1100s. If you're under 150 - 160 pounds, you can go with the 280's front and rear. 160 - 180, try 280 front / 330 rear. Over two bills, like me? 330s are pretty light for you. I'm on Mavic GP4s (395) or Saturnes (Made by Ambrosio for Specialized, around 330 - 350, IIRC).

For new production, Sun M19II's are claimed at 370 g, Damon Rinard has weighed samples from 340 - 360. Sounds like they are quoting the weight if the rims are extruded on old dies, which is what everyone should do. I have no experience with this rim.

For tires, go with a 250 - 300 gram training tire. A lot of people complain about the Vittoria Rallys, and I understand why, but they are way, way better than cheap sewups were 15 years ago. And at 23 mm and 90 / 95 psi, they just kill any 23 or 25 mm clincher I've ever owned, regardless of price. They do take about 75 - 100 miles to round out the little lumps, but a local shop guy just suggested to ride 'em for about 10 miles at 65 - 70 psi, so I'll try that next time. 20 bucks at any Performance bike shop, probably less on line.

Conti Sprinter 250s can be had on the 'net for 30 bucks, and Conti Giros for 20. Yellow Jersey has the 20 dollar Clements, that I've heard good things about, but I don't like black sidewalls on road tires. Gommitalia Champions have gotten some good words, about 20 - 25 bucks at AEBike or AirBomb.

If you really want to go all out, there's the Andre Dugast silks, at about $150 - $170. He even makes a 27mm that I'll probably put on my Rivendell.

--Shannon, thinking about the ride of a 27 mm handmade silk....
Tufo makes a good, round, cheap, fairly light training tire in their S22. For $20, you get a 250g tire that is as round as an expensive tire from someone else...

Then again, I like Tufos. (and Conti Comps, and...)

Mike
 

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Arrogant roadie.....
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Forget Vittoria Rally's-they weigh more like 340g, and they are so poorly built that you'd be better off with anything else. Oh, they ride like they are filled with concrete, too. I remember tubulars from 25 years ago-nothing we had back then was this bad. Not by a long shot.

Now, if you want to find a good, round, decent riding, flat resistant tubular cheap, look at Tufo S22. They cost about $28 each, wear well, ride well, and are well made.
 

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Check out the Zipp 440's on ebay. They are essentially the same as 404's with a different (heavier) hubset. The 440 hubs have a cool looking carbon fiber center shell and they are pretty durable. I had one of these front hubs once and I weighed it at 135 grams which is reasonable. The wheelsets always seem to go for less than $400. Most people forget that these wheels existed so it is pretty easy to win the auctions.

Here's a look at the hubs. Nice! http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...ndexURL=1&photoDisplayType=2#ebayphotohosting
 

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KRider said:
I'd like to get a set of spare wheels (tubulars) but I don't want to have to shell out like $800.00. Anyone know of any decent tubular wheelsets/rims? Something not too heavy would be nice and around the price of say $400.00 for a wheelset.

I'd love to have a pair of the Zipp Carbons (any of 'em) but that's far too much than I could ever justify (still...).

Thanks!

KRider
:confused: What about handbuilt wheels? You should be able to get something nice for around $300.

http://www.coloradocyclist.com/comm...FNBR=762&CRPCGNBR=762&TextMode=0&CI=1,224,333
 

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Dave_Stohler said:
Forget Vittoria Rally's-they weigh more like 340g, and they are so poorly built that you'd be better off with anything else. Oh, they ride like they are filled with concrete, too. I remember tubulars from 25 years ago-nothing we had back then was this bad. Not by a long shot.

Now, if you want to find a good, round, decent riding, flat resistant tubular cheap, look at Tufo S22. They cost about $28 each, wear well, ride well, and are well made.
I have to disagree here, at least with the pair that are on my bike now. It may be that QA is up to the usual standards of Southeast Asia, and that you got an exceptionally bad set. Or maybe I got 4 really good ones, because the 2 that are on the bike now and the 2 that are stretching on the spare rims in the closet are far, far rounder and straighter than I remeber Wolber Neo-Pros or Invulnerables ($15 tires in 1989) being.

I just mentioned them because they have a horrible reputation, and I have to say, they are not THAT bad. Kevlar belted and cheap, too.

--Shannon, riding Rallys and not feeling bumps, in San Diego, CA
 

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One poster mentioned the Sun M19 rim. I have a pair of DA / Sun wheels that are very good. The M19II rim evolved out of the line of M17 and M19 tubular rims. The M17s (17mm width, 295 grams) were for climbing and time trials while the M19s (19mm width) were for general racing. I rode a pair of the M17s for many years, respoked the wheels several times, and still have that very light front wheel. The Sun M-series tubular rims are an aero shape and very strong.
 

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440s are NOT 404s!

Max-Q said:
Check out the Zipp 440's on ebay. They are essentially the same as 404's with a different (heavier) hubset. The 440 hubs have a cool looking carbon fiber center shell and they are pretty durable. I had one of these front hubs once and I weighed it at 135 grams which is reasonable. The wheelsets always seem to go for less than $400. Most people forget that these wheels existed so it is pretty easy to win the auctions.

Here's a look at the hubs. Nice! http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...ndexURL=1&photoDisplayType=2#ebayphotohosting
While they're both aero, light, and (dare I say, sexy) the two rims are not the same. 404s are much nicer to brake on with that ceramic-ized brake track, are lighter, etc.

They do both do the same thing: go fast. If you don't mind not having the latest and greatest (Shaun Wallace keeps winning races on an ancient pair of 440s...) you can get great deals on the older Zipps.

Watch out for the Zipp carbon-center rear hubs. They're not the best bearing design. IIRC, there's a bushing on the freehub side that is problematic. The front's are find. In fact, I have an 18 hole carbon center front hub if someone needs one.

Nice thing about the older Zipps is that they used regular spokes. Makes it much easier to replace if you do something to them.

Mike
 

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for racing sew-ups, try Veloflex...

I bought a pair of 70 x 22 Veleflex Criterium tires last fall for my Shamals but haven't glued them yet. They look really well-made and there were no lumps when when I had them stretching on a rim. Anyone I know who has actually used them swears they are the best all-around road racing and crit tire that exists with respectable puncture resistance and mileage too boot. They are supposed to be similar but better than Vittoria Corsa CX's. In fact, Veloflex still makes them by hand in the old Vittoria factory in Italy, rather than mass producing them in Indonesia. Most prices for them are $75-90 each but I got mine for about $55 shipped from Don Donnelly at [email protected]. That's still not cheap but why go cheap on tires if you are looking for high-performance wheels? "Danny" shipped quickly with no problems. The actual tire weight was also right around the advertised 240 grams.

I also just went for a test ride with a new pair of Veleflex Pave clinchers with some Michelin latex tubes in them. At 180 grams, they are a very fast, grippy, and supple tire. I have my doubts on their mileage, but that's why they're 180 grams instead of 230. If the Criteriums have the same mannerisms as the Pave's, I'd say they are definitely worth $56. A better "bang for your buck" tire would be the continental sprinter. It's not as smooth as a cotton casing tire, but definitely race worthy.
 
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