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a quick way to get to 12.98 pounds on a speesh frame:

edge 45 front hub alchemy elf w/ 20 sapim cx-ray spokes
edge 65 rear hub c-4 ceramic w/ 24 sapim cx-ray spokes
schwalbe durano tubs
sram red shifters w/ hudz soft hoods
sram red rd
sram 1090 cogs
sram 1091r chain
fsa slk-light compact cranks w/ fsa ceramic bb
dura-ace 7700 fd w/ rotor chain catcher
kcnc C-7 brakes w/ swisstop yellow pads
i-Links brake housing
mini i-Links shift housing
powercordz cables
fsa os-99 stem w/ kcnc spacers
titan carbon handlebar w/ lizard skin tape
thomson masterpiece seatpost
time i-clic pedals
becker saddle
btp bottle cages


 

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By the time you change out the parts one by one, you will have a lighter bike that's few years old and by then more model of bikes will come out that is lighter and cheaper that what you have spent thus far. It's never ending quest for vanity that you can't ever satisfy.
Do your self a favor and just go ride with what you have.
You'll realize that riding itself is far more rewarding than sitting down and looking at featherweight parts that cost an arm and a leg through internet. There is no ends to the lust of our eyes.
Then again, if you're made of money or if money is falling out of your ears and nose all the time, do it but remember. Your satisfaction will only last for few months or less and you will want to upgrade something more or yet another bike will captivate your eyes of your heart.
 

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When I worked in a high end shop back in the mid 90's I bought a gram scale and a commercial grade scale so customers could check out the weight of their bikes. We never heard the cash register ring more. Get over it. I have 3 road bikes. My S.S. weighs 14.75 my carbon about 16.5 and my IF steel is around 18 plus. Who fricking cares. All 3 of them require me to pedal them. Yes make your bike reasonably light, but don't agonize over 100 grams.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
spastook said:
When I worked in a high end shop back in the mid 90's I bought a gram scale and a commercial grade scale so customers could check out the weight of their bikes. We never heard the cash register ring more. Get over it. I have 3 road bikes. My S.S. weighs 14.75 my carbon about 16.5 and my IF steel is around 18 plus. Who fricking cares. All 3 of them require me to pedal them. Yes make your bike reasonably light, but don't agonize over 100 grams.
Well, a lot of cyclists here DO CARE...especially those who frequently visit this thread. Now, most cyclists (myself included), would agree with you that 100 gram saving here and there is not going to make a really noticeable difference in overall performance at all. But, as with any other hobby out there, it's fun to tinker with our bikes...whether it be to change the looks of the bike, change the performance, or simply trying to shed some weight. It's just a GOAL that some of us have. Some may even call it an obsession. As long as you are financially responsible, I don't see anything wrong with this "obsession". :D
 

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simon1967 said:
By the time you change out the parts one by one, you will have a lighter bike that's few years old and by then more model of bikes will come out that is lighter and cheaper that what you have spent thus far. It's never ending quest for vanity that you can't ever satisfy.
Do your self a favor and just go ride with what you have.
You'll realize that riding itself is far more rewarding than sitting down and looking at featherweight parts that cost an arm and a leg through internet. There is no ends to the lust of our eyes.
Then again, if you're made of money or if money is falling out of your ears and nose all the time, do it but remember. Your satisfaction will only last for few months or less and you will want to upgrade something more or yet another bike will captivate your eyes of your heart.
Ah, excellent first post. So original and insightful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
spastook said:
Didn't mean to insult anyone. I'm a former weight weenie myself but have been thru the 12 step program. The addiction is a tough one to beat but it CAN be done.
Spastook: No offense taken. I personally didn't feel offended either. Just wanted to point out that this is a Weight Weenie thread and so we discuss topics about dropping weight. Glad to see you beat the addiction. :thumbsup:
 

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Cni2i said:
Hi everyone. Since this IS the weight weenie forum, I'm going to ask....

My current bike is at 15.30 lbs with the following main components:

1. 2010 Sworks Tarmac 52 cm frame set (with s works seat stem and fork)
2. Roval Rapide SL 45 wheel set with specialized Mondo Pro II tires and "superlight" turbo tubes
3. Specialized toupe saddle with ti rails
4. Red shifters, RD, and compact crank
5. Force brakes and FD
6. Specialized S-works carbon bars
7. Ritchey carbon stem
8. LOOK Keo 2 Max pedals
9. 6700 Ultegra cassette (11-28)
10. 2 S-works carbon cages
11. Sram PC 1070 chain

BESIDES getting a new set of wheels, what is the best way for me to get below 15lbs? Suggestions? Thanks.
I'm curious why you need that mountain bike gearing on a lightweight road bike. A closer ratio cassette would save a lot of weight.
 

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I say the cheapest weight gain is your tires and your saddle. Veloflex Pave (they have one that is called Black - it's just a rebadged Pave, which has black sidewalls), Kenda Kaliente (189g), and I think you can get the Diamante Pro in a 700X25, Vredestein makes a 180g clincher tire, etc. - get a tire that is less than 200 grams, less rolling weight. The thing about high-end Vittorias is they perform better on the high end of the designated pressure. Although Veloflex clinchers are a bear to put on new, I used them on my front wheel.

Every saddle with a cutout is going to weigh a lot more instead of one without a cutout. Get a saddle that weighs less than 200 grams. The Aspide (the old model, not the new one) Selle San Marco says it's 170 grams, but it's more like it's 180-190 grams, and most saddle manufacturers lie about the weight of their saddles - the same goes for pedals.
 
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