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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i just replaced my chain (with the correct number of links and all)
and i took my bike for a test ride.
it has really slow shifting now.. not as responsive, but like a 0.75 second delay before shifting up (to smaller cog) and when im at the 6th cog i try to go up again but all i hear is a clicking sound... then i try to shift up again and it jumps up 2 cogs !! what gives?
did accidently jar my rear derailler out of line when i installed the chain?
but it shifts down (to bigger cogs) pretty responsively...
please helps :(
 

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daivs_T said:
so i just replaced my chain (with the correct number of links and all)
and i took my bike for a test ride.
it has really slow shifting now.. not as responsive, but like a 0.75 second delay before shifting up (to smaller cog) and when im at the 6th cog i try to go up again but all i hear is a clicking sound... then i try to shift up again and it jumps up 2 cogs !! what gives?
did accidently jar my rear derailler out of line when i installed the chain?
but it shifts down (to bigger cogs) pretty responsively...
please helps :(
You've checked your cable tension? More likely culprit than knocking your derailleur hanger out of true.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Packing Grease

Does the chain have stiff links from all that packing grease? Clean and lube if this is the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ive recently had my cables tightend.. so unless taking off the chain releases tension...
how can i tell if the chain is stiff?
play with it? or just listen to the sound it makes through the cogs and jockeys?
 

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daivs_T said:
ive recently had my cables tightend.. so unless taking off the chain releases tension...
how can i tell if the chain is stiff?
play with it? or just listen to the sound it makes through the cogs and jockeys?
Turn the pedal backwards by hand and watch the chain coming off the top of the cassette. Stiff links won't "bend" and follow the contours of the cassette... i.e., they'll just be sticking out there and "clunk" into place eventually. If you find one, just grab the chain in your hands and work the link up and down a whole bunch of times. Keep the hand-cleaner nearby! :D

As for your original problem... How worn was the original chain when you replaced it? If it was badly worn (everything you ever wanted to know is here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html), then a new chain won't mesh with the cassette very well, which will cause all kinds of problems.
 

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Ethical Nihilist
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As the chain wears it stretches and you may have to tighten the derailler tension, as you did, to maintain shifting. Now with a new chain, you may need to turn the barrel adjuster on the rear derailler to loosen the tension just a bit. Its normal when changing chains to have to readjust the tension on the rear der.
 

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Maybe cogs are worn out.

daivs_T said:
so i just replaced my chain (with the correct number of links and all)
and i took my bike for a test ride.
it has really slow shifting now.. not as responsive, but like a 0.75 second delay before shifting up (to smaller cog) and when im at the 6th cog i try to go up again but all i hear is a clicking sound... then i try to shift up again and it jumps up 2 cogs !! what gives?
did accidently jar my rear derailler out of line when i installed the chain?
but it shifts down (to bigger cogs) pretty responsively...
please helps :(
:idea:The new chain clicks in the 6th cog, and jumps up 2 cogs, 7 and 8? I bet you use those gears alot, right? They very well might be worn to the point the new chain doesn't seat well on them. The links in the new chain are too short for the cog teeth. If your old chain and cogset is over 3000 miles old, it would start to stretch and wear the cogs most used with it. The solution would be to replace the cogset before putting any miles on the new chain. Otherwise, you'll stretch the new chain unnecessarily on the worn cogs.

You can check alignment by seeing if the jockey wheel pulleys line up with the cog you're in. If the old chain shifted ok, the derailleur is probably still in synch. When you put the new cogset on you can fine tune the shifting. :thumbsup:
 

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just a guess, I have seen it at my shop a few times, shift to the largest rear cog (25 or 27t etc) than with out pedaling shift down to your 11 or 12t. unhook the housing at the rear der stop to get slack in the cable. once you have done that pull the housing at the shifter and push the head of the cable out like you were going to replace the cable. I have seen many 10 spd ULT and D/A shifters fry cables about an inch from the head. it causes really crazy shifting issues.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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macalu said:
As the chain wears it stretches and you may have to tighten the derailler tension, as you did, to maintain shifting. Now with a new chain, you may need to turn the barrel adjuster on the rear derailler to loosen the tension just a bit. Its normal when changing chains to have to readjust the tension on the rear der.
it's pretty much accepted that chains don't 'stretch', they get wear in the bushings that equates to them getting 'loose', or longer.
i also can't understand why installing a new chain would require an adjustment to the derailleur.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ok so i did the barrel adjuster and it seemed to fix it..
not until i completely wiped the chain and relubed it . it's pretty crisp now..
thanks guys. didint know that grease on the chain is packing grease... thought it came pre lubed lol
 

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What? Me worry?
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macalu said:
As the chain wears it stretches and you may have to tighten the derailler tension, as you did, to maintain shifting. Now with a new chain, you may need to turn the barrel adjuster on the rear derailler to loosen the tension just a bit. Its normal when changing chains to have to readjust the tension on the rear der.
Wrong. Otherwise derailleur adjustment would be required with every gear shift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
or maybe not...
it does the jump 2 cog trick up and down around the same 2-3 cog area...
perhaps may cassette is already worn? after only 1400 miles? =[
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
my chain was at the 1% wear mark on the spin doctor chain checker ( i know.. TOO LATE =[ ) i was shockd it was stretched so much in 1400 miles...
could this be the reason for the premature wear on my cogs?
or does my derailler need adjustment.. its hard to tell
 

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Bad data?

daivs_T said:
my chain was at the 1% wear mark on the spin doctor chain checker ( i know.. TOO LATE =[ ) i was shockd it was stretched so much in 1400 miles...
could this be the reason for the premature wear on my cogs?
or does my derailler need adjustment.. its hard to tell
I wouldn't trust that chain checker tool. Get a decent ruler and measure 24 links (12 inches original length). Only if you have exceeded 1/16" of elongation in those 12 inches do you have a worn out chain. Most chains, if properly cared for, will easily go longer than 1400 miles.
 

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daivs_T said:
my chain was at the 1% wear mark on the spin doctor chain checker ( i know.. TOO LATE =[ ) i was shockd it was stretched so much in 1400 miles...
could this be the reason for the premature wear on my cogs?
or does my derailler need adjustment.. its hard to tell
I've seen guys wear out cheap Shimano chains in 1500 miles, if they mash big gears all the time. They'll put a new chain on and it'll jump on the most used cogs, but spin smoothly on the cogs seldom used, obviously. I changed a chain once for a guy whose big ring was really worn and his small ring looked brand new. It wasn't even dirty. He mashed along in the big ring with the 4th to 6th gears on the rear freewheel. The smaller cogs will wear faster because they have less teeth to share the load, and the loads are considerably higher the faster you're going. Unless you live in a moutainous area, then your climbing gears will be the first to "skip."

Working the crank around with your hand with the bike in a stand, the chain will shift smoothly, but it could still skip under pressure from actually riding. You have to put it in the big ring and try to sprint in the suspect cog, being careful not to bust a nut when the chain jumps. :cryin: More than once, I've had the chain working fine on a moderate climb, then start to jump when the grade got steeper. Damn gear gave out when I needed it most!

Your problem could be something else. Are the cogs the chain jumps on ones you use more than the others? Which ones are they? (How many teeth?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
im not really the gear masher type though...
but im almost sure its a worn cassette :/ only after 1400 miles... so sad...
but ill find out for sure when i take her in to get sram force installed :D
 
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