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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm relatively (2 years) new to cycling but have gotten pretty into it. What is anyone's opinion or review of - any of these supplements: Optygen, Sportlegs, Epovar? Does any of this stuff really do anything? I'm doing about 800 miles a month but wasnt before, it was more like 400 then I heard the advice "ride twice what you are and you will keep up with faster people" - which, worked. I also am trying the Epovar by Fizogen - but, I really cant say if its that or the miles (Common sense says the miles.....) thats allowing me to keep up with people I otherwise couldn't. Any feedback, has anyone noticed any success with these supplements? Thanks
 

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I'm not much of a fan of supplements. Two obvious (to me) reasons are that 1) someone burning a bunch of extra calories should have no problem getting a balanced diet and 2) supplements are just overpriced food. That's without even going into the issues of quality control and unsubstantiated claims. The IOC tested 600 supplements and showed that 15% of them (90!) would cause positive dope tests for banned substances.

The Feb 24, 2003 issue of VeloNews has some interesting comments from Christiane Ayotte, head of Canada's leading anti doping lab. (Remember that the US supplements industry effectively lobbied congress several years ago and prevented the US FDA from regulating the industry except in cases of human safety. Supplements imported from many countries are even less regulated.) She said that supplements' "claimed actions, efficiency, or potency have not been thoroughly investigated by controlled clinical studies and remain for the most part anecdotal." "athletes are targeted by the sport nutritional industry by very aggressive and efficient marketing, but for the vast majority of the products . . , the scientific proofs supporting their claims are not there. But the athletes believe: It is more on the side of faith than facts. One only listens to what he wants and becomes deaf, blind to all logical arguments."

A recent German study analyzed 600 samples of nutritional supplements and found anabolic steroids in 20% at levels that could result in a positive dope test. None of these supplements were labeled as containing steroids. In the US, supplements are not tested or regulated, and need not be labeled as containing steroids. Add to this the fact that no good (controlled, double blind) studies have shown benefits of supplementation for athletes over a balanced diet. When an active person consumes a balanced diet, it is extremely easy to get the required nutritional components. This is because the high level of activity requires a large food intake, and so the nutrients come along automatically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Kerry Irons said:
I'm not much of a fan of supplements. Two obvious (to me) reasons are that 1) someone burning a bunch of extra calories should have no problem getting a balanced diet and 2) supplements are just overpriced food. That's without even going into the issues of quality control and unsubstantiated claims. The IOC tested 600 supplements and showed that 15% of them (90!) would cause positive dope tests for banned substances.

The Feb 24, 2003 issue of VeloNews has some interesting comments from Christiane Ayotte, head of Canada's leading anti doping lab. (Remember that the US supplements industry effectively lobbied congress several years ago and prevented the US FDA from regulating the industry except in cases of human safety. Supplements imported from many countries are even less regulated.) She said that supplements' "claimed actions, efficiency, or potency have not been thoroughly investigated by controlled clinical studies and remain for the most part anecdotal." "athletes are targeted by the sport nutritional industry by very aggressive and efficient marketing, but for the vast majority of the products . . , the scientific proofs supporting their claims are not there. But the athletes believe: It is more on the side of faith than facts. One only listens to what he wants and becomes deaf, blind to all logical arguments."

A recent German study analyzed 600 samples of nutritional supplements and found anabolic steroids in 20% at levels that could result in a positive dope test. None of these supplements were labeled as containing steroids. In the US, supplements are not tested or regulated, and need not be labeled as containing steroids. Add to this the fact that no good (controlled, double blind) studies have shown benefits of supplementation for athletes over a balanced diet. When an active person consumes a balanced diet, it is extremely easy to get the required nutritional components. This is because the high level of activity requires a large food intake, and so the nutrients come along automatically.
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Thanks for taking the time to provide all that information, i appreciate it. I think what I might do is take the one i'm taking (the fizogen epovar) to my doctor to have her look at it.
maybe even send it off to a lab..........dissect it, report whats in it, if its safe. It works though - i mean, after a couple weeks using it i notice i do not breathe as hard as i used to for the same effort, and i can just it seems, hammer without my legs starting to hurt for a lot longer time. Anyway, thanks again for the info.
 

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Epovar

IIRC, Epovar is just a Mg supplement. There is one very poor published study on this, which these clowns use to justify their outrageous claims. You may feel better just because you're getting in better shape. You could get the same amount of Mg (or whatever it was) by using any standard multi-vitamin. This stuff absolutely fits the mold of what is wrong with the unregulated claims in the supplement market.
 
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