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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my bike, a 2008 Sirrus Sport:

http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?arc=2008&spid=32218

I am interested to try swept back handlebars like the Wald #8095 here:

http://www.bikepartsplace.com/brands/wald/3/

Do I need a different stem ? It looks to me like the Specialized stem and clamp are too wide for the Wald bar.
Also, is the part that the stem slides into called a steerer tube ? That part looks much wider than the narrow looking stem which is pictured on the page with the Wald handlebar.

What I am trying to do is replace the Specialized flat handlebars with something more upright and swept back. Looking for a more comfortable ride. I would appreciate any help about parts needed, or opinions as to whether this idea is worth pursuing.
 

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The bars are a smaller diameter than your clamp. there are shims available to make up this difference, but a new stem would be advisable.

You do realize that your bike is going to be pretty ugly with those bars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are there other models of swept back bars which might look better on my bike ?

I realize the Sirrus Sport was designed by Specialized to have flat handlebars, but I think I would be more comfortable riding with the bars a little higher and swept back grips.

funktekk said:
The bars are a smaller diameter than your clamp. there are shims available to make up this difference, but a new stem would be advisable.

You do realize that your bike is going to be pretty ugly with those bars.
 

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The part where the top of the forks meets the stem is called the steerer tube. Yours is 1 1/8" threadless.
The part where the stem clamps the bars is the handlebar size. Yours is 31.8, also known as "oversize"

You'll need a stem that matches both, of course. There are shims available as well. The usual shim sizes are 31.8 to 26.0, and 25.4 to 26.0. There might be a 25.5 to 31.8, if you look around a bit.

Rivendell carries several models of bar you might like, along with shims.
http://www.rivbike.com/products/list/handlebars_stems_and_tape?a=1&page=all#product=none
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So with a shim any of the 25.4 swept back bars will work on my 31.8 oversized stem ?

But, I need to keep the stem oversized because of the oversized steerer tube etc...?

If I understand correctly the only option for my bike is to keep the stem oversized, and use a shim. Only an oversized stem will work on my bike ?, A traditional size stem like the Wald stem pictured here http://www.bikepartsplace.com/brands/wald/3/ won't work on my bike ?
 

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Might be a job for a bike shop...

As everybody else has pointed out, there are variables here that seem to approach the level of your current knowledge (no insult intended--we've all been there). We'd all like to see bike shops stay in business for those occasions when we need one, so this might be a good time to drop by and let them figure out what you need. You're going to have to buy parts anyway, and by the time you pay shipping, the cost may approach what you'll pay at a shop.
As for the appearance of the swept-back bars...well, yes, by traditional standards it will look a little ugly. But I have an old neck injury that's beginning to cause some problems as I get older, and I just put Rivendell's Albatross bars on my Atlantis. You can see those at the site creaky recommended, www.rivbike.com.
You might also consider keeping your existing bars, but changing stems to get them higher. Drop bars originated to provide a comfortable cruising position on the top flat part near the stem, with the option of going down on the drops to get aero. Over the decades it's become fashionable to set them so the tops are about where the drops ought to be.
 

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There is something to be said for moving the hands back instead of up to achieve an upright riding position for shorter distances—it eliminates all that "ape-hanger" stress from the neck and shoulders. Makes for a very relaxed riding position, as millions of Dutch riders would tell you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cory,

Here in San Francisco the shops I have visited are all about selling a customer a bike.
The salespeople are willing to let a customer test ride anything, but they're not much on fitting or making alteration/modification suggestions.
Most likely I will have a shop do the work, but I know in advance I will have to specify exactly what parts I want, and probably buy the parts on my own as well. Fortunately, a forum like this one has experienced cyclists who may be able to give me good advice.
As far raising the existing flat bars, I've adjusted the saddle to get the most comfortable ride I can, however I think I would prefer a swept back bar (grips facing sideways) versus the flat bar (hands facing downwards).



CoryF said:
As everybody else has pointed out, there are variables here that seem to approach the level of your current knowledge (no insult intended--we've all been there). We'd all like to see bike shops stay in business for those occasions when we need one, so this might be a good time to drop by and let them figure out what you need. You're going to have to buy parts anyway, and by the time you pay shipping, the cost may approach what you'll pay at a shop.
As for the appearance of the swept-back bars...well, yes, by traditional standards it will look a little ugly. But I have an old neck injury that's beginning to cause some problems as I get older, and I just put Rivendell's Albatross bars on my Atlantis. You can see those at the site creaky recommended, www.rivbike.com.
You might also consider keeping your existing bars, but changing stems to get them higher. Drop bars originated to provide a comfortable cruising position on the top flat part near the stem, with the option of going down on the drops to get aero. Over the decades it's become fashionable to set them so the tops are about where the drops ought to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would like to find a photo of a bike with swept back bars and the thumb shifter style controls which my bike uses.. All the photos I've seen of swept back bars are old converted ten speeds with frame mounted lever shifters, or the old 3-peed style finger shifter.

Touch0Gray said:
nitto makes several swept back style bars, A good friend calls them "paper boy" bars

edit: http://www.velo-orange.com/niprha.html

and they are alloy not cast iron! and will probably fit the stem

You will most likely need new cables if you get swept back bars
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I notice road bike cyclists often riding with their hands on the corners of the tops, so that their wrists/hands are oriented similar to the dutch 3 speed swept back grips.
The road bars are forward, but it's still the concept of palms perpendicular to the ground rather than palms. I have not been riding long, but my guess is that I am not going to be comfortable with flat bar and palms facing downward.

wim said:
There is something to be said for moving the hands back instead of up to achieve an upright riding position for shorter distances—it eliminates all that "ape-hanger" stress from the neck and shoulders. Makes for a very relaxed riding position, as millions of Dutch riders would tell you.
 

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dutch......phhhhhhht

Velo orange say FRENCH....LOL

These are trigger shifters (shimano) but would work with any thumb type, (grip shift, not so much)

Nitto Promenade 48 cm on an adjustable stem with trigger shifters, on a cross bike....

before you guys flame me...I set my cross up for my wife for the exact same reasons the OP wants these bars
 

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DG, is that what you are looking for?.....I got these bars at Bens Cycle, they have 3 or 4 different promenade bars
 

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+1 for Ben's Cycle in Milwaukee.
They are the best at customer service and carry a wide range of Track/FG/SS stuff I can't find anywhere else. Especially Cogs and Chainrings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Touch,

Thank you for posting the photos.What is the straight swept length of those bars ? You were able to install the grip and clamp the shifter hardware all on the straight part, before the bar starts to bend, and I would like to how much space you had for that.

I was not really considering the Promenade model, because the degree of sweep back is more severe than some of the other bars. Your bar there is swept back to about 90*,, so the grips are parallel with the top tube ? I was thinking of getting a bar that is a little wider than the Promenade, and swept back to a less sever degree, maybe around 60* to 70*.
But, the amount of straight that is available for mounting grips and shifter hardware is relevant, and I am open to ideas.. Many of these bars are described as being able to accept MTB style shifters, but they don't specify the length of the straight portion. I guess on some bars the shifter could be mounted to a bar-bend-corner, but there I wonder if it would be too awkward to reach the shifter.
Touch0Gray said:
Velo orange say FRENCH....LOL

These are trigger shifters (shimano) but would work with any thumb type, (grip shift, not so much)

Nitto Promenade 48 cm on an adjustable stem with trigger shifters, on a cross bike....

before you guys flame me...I set my cross up for my wife for the exact same reasons the OP wants these bars
 

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DG123 said:
I have not been riding long, but my guess is that I am not going to be comfortable with flat bar and palms facing downward.
Your guess is correct. Low flat bars held palms down excell in situations where you need to make extremely fast steering motions, have lots of leverage for ploughing through difficult ground and for having a large amount of weight on the front tire. For relaxed cruising on asphalt, you're better off with swept-backs, which allow you to ride with virtually no weight on your hands. Many Dutch cyclists ride with the tip of one index finger resting lightly on the left or right grip. The upper body is held upright by the back muscles, not the arms and hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I am hoping the geometry of my bike is o.k. for swept back bars of 60* to 70*.
As far as I know none of the big manufacturer are producing bikes with this much bar sweep back. Instead the comfort bikes seem to be designed for saddle well below the bars and riser bars with a sweep of 15* to 20*, fat tires etc... That's not what I want.
I like my bike, http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?arc=2008&sid=08Sirrus.
I like its weight and responsiveness and handling. I know that some of these features will be compromised by switching the bars to a swept back style, but I am willing to sacrifice on the performance side to gain some on the body comfort side.
The dutch bikes and old 3-speeds which popularized these bars had a different geometry from my Sirrus, but I am hoping the swept back bar style will work o,k, regardless.


wim said:
Your guess is correct. Low flat bars held palms down excell in situations where you need to make extremely fast steering motions, have lots of leverage for ploughing through difficult ground and for having a large amount of weight on the front tire. For relaxed cruising on asphalt, you're better off with swept-backs, which allow you to ride with virtually no weight on your hands. Many Dutch cyclists ride with the tip of one index finger resting lightly on the left or right grip. The upper body is held upright by the back muscles, not the arms and hands.
 

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DG123 said:
The dutch bikes and old 3-speeds which popularized these bars had a different frame geometry from my Sirrus, but I am hoping the swept back bar style will work o,k, regardless.
Your quest is about establishing the right points in space for your butt, your hands and your feet. The frame geometry of your bike is close enough to any other bike that component choice will enable you to get exactly to where you want to go in terms of comfort. At most, there will be a handling difference—Dutch cruisers want to go straight and beg to be ridden with one hand holding a sandwich and the other a cell phone. :)
 

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if you can wait until tomorrow i will shoot the bars from the top and measure them. I don't have them on the bike now. I had no problems mounting the brakes and shifters, I did have to trim the grips though, but I think that was because of the separate brake and shifter your's are integrated, correct? Call Ben's too, they are great to deal with, I wish they were a little closer, I'd be in there all the time. (they were right down the road from my daughter when she was in Milwaukee).

I have ridden with those bars and they are really comfortable, however, I like to climb standing a lot and they are awkward for me...I am sure i could get used to it though, I put a low rise flat bar back on them with bar ends for ME for the winter.

still say they are french not dutch
 
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