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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is by far my favorite section of the forum, and I've been spending some time trying to take some photos with my Canon SD200 (Digital Elph) camera. My results have been pretty disappointing.

Can anyone offer suggestions for those of us fairly new to photography that aren't using SLRs on how to take decent photos while in motion? I can ride fairly steady with one hand, but my shots are mostly blurry.

Scott
 

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passive/aggressive
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I use an SD230 for photos and I love it. It can fit in your mouth when you need both hands quickly. I use the vivid color setting and make sure the ISO is set at the Highest speed possible (for my camera it is 400). I have practiced with it many times to get the pictures and I have found that the timed exposure can be a boon allowing you to set the camera then get it in position.

Finally I have set mine to have the smallest focus setting as possible and eliminated digital zoom. That said I must mention that this is a really old camera using compact flash memory and initially coming with 16mb card.

All I have to show is mountain biking pictures but here is an example:

 

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In need of sock puppet
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Really looking forward to seeing what answers you get on this one.

When I'm shooting on bike, I'll only shoot while coasting, and typically while rolling fairly slow. I concentrate on holding the camera steady and usually will shoot three or four shots of the same scene to increase my odds that one of them will come out.

A couple of things I do to make it easier to take on bike shots.
- Use a bento box to hold the camera on the top tube
- The camera has the strap attached, and I don't even think of taking the camera out of the bento until my hand is through the strap.
- The shots seem to be more stable when shooting ahead or behind, rather than to the side.
- Being tall, I really like riding ahead of a group, then holding the camera above my head pointed back at the group and then snap a few pics.
- I also like shots taken down low, through the bike, of the front wheel while rolling, or of the front of a group from a ground-level view.
 

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had it in the ear before
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these shots were takin w/ a Canon sd1000 on "auto" setting whilst riding. My only advice is to depress the button to let if focus and try to steady it and take alot b/c 2/3 of them wont turn out.



 

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Oh I forgot. I use the bracket function to take 3 pictures like a motor drive giving you a better shot at catching the objective. Looks like 3 squares cascading away. Set it aim and hold the release button.
 

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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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I keep my P & S in my right-rear jersey pocket. I hate stopping so I rarely stop to take a shot. I for sure won't stop on any kind of a climb.

To prevent blurring, always shoot at the widest focal length and try, like Coop said, to shoot ahead of behind, but not off the side.
 

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This is a simple camera shake problem. But even despite your best attempts to hold the camera steady, you won't always succeed. So take several shots as has already been suggested multiple times. If you still have problems, then experiment with different ways of holding the camera and different ways of pressing the button (e.g., press it slowly and smoothly rather than abruptly).
 

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I've never had a problem shooting while riding so I am likely not much help.

I just use the auto function and click away. Probably toss 75% of the images I shoot so shoot lots and you will likely get enough good ones to make up a ride report.
 

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waterproof*
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I've mused aimlessly on the idea of a helmet or other type of mount; it seems I miss a lot of good shots b/c they are gone before I can get the camera out, power up, aim, shoot.

With a big enough memory card, and a remote trigger hanging down like a hydration valve... hmmm....
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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daxiang28 said:
I just fire off a bunch. One's bound to be the shot you want.
SD450:

Bingo. I use my SD600 Elph on full-auto and click away. A full battery and a big SD card a good things to have.
 

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Riding towards Delmarva.
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It helps if you include yourself in part of the photo, as this will be "sharper" than your background which will increase depth and create a nice focal point.

I carry an Elph in a Bento box that I've reinforced with cardboard.

I personally like to have my camera after 150 mile rides, while waiting for the train. Definitely.
 

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Bacon!
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When I use my Camelback I have a camera case attached to the chest strap for carrying. I probably shoot upwards of 200 pics on a 75 mile or longer ride. One thing that has helped is owning a camera with vibration reduction, but I got thousands of useable pics from my old Sony DSCW7 with no problems at all. The key is learning to shoot while riding and not getting killed in the process. Takes some practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
John Nelson said:
This is a simple camera shake problem. But even despite your best attempts to hold the camera steady, you won't always succeed. So take several shots as has already been suggested multiple times. If you still have problems, then experiment with different ways of holding the camera and different ways of pressing the button (e.g., press it slowly and smoothly rather than abruptly).
Okay, this is good to hear. I do occasionally get a good shot out of several and perhaps I've just been under the mistaken impression that more experienced photographers are able to set up their camera for the perfect shot without discarding several attempts.

One question about camera shake - image stabilization is popping up on many cameras, even some of the newer Canon SD series. Does this feature really work as well as it sounds? I might consider picking one up if it's really worthwhile, and giving my SD200 to my parents as their first digital camera.

Scott
 

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Bacon!
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It seems to make a difference. I get shots I didn't think were possible due to vibration and low light conditions. On my Nikon I get very few blurred shots unless I really, really, shake it around.
 

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Big is relative
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When I do rolling shots, I don't worry about the aim or subject, I just point and take a bunch of pictures. Digital is great, just delete the stuff that you don't want. The unintended shots have sometimes been the best.

When I was commuting in Hawaii, on days when I intended to do rolling shots, it wasn't unusual to have 40-50 shots during a 45 minute commute. I would get a dozen or so "keepers" out of that group.

The bento box suggestion is a good one, that is how I carried my camera in Hawaii. I put a folded piece of cloth in the bottom of the box to pad the camera from the top tube. The camera was usually in a ziplock bag. My newest camera is a pentax 7.1 that is waterproof. I can carry it in my jersey as long as I remember to point the lens away from my back. Pointed towards my back will cause condensation on the surface of the lens.
 

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zpl said:
One question about camera shake - image stabilization is popping up on many cameras, even some of the newer Canon SD series. Does this feature really work as well as it sounds? I might consider picking one up if it's really worthwhile, and giving my SD200 to my parents as their first digital camera.

Scott
I don't know whether or not image stabilization helps or not, but I do know that it is not a miracle cure, Cameras with this feature can still take blurry shots due to camera shake. My guess is that the image stabilization can only do so much, but I'm not sure how much that is.
 

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In need of sock puppet
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blakcloud said:
Can someone take a photo of their bento box attached to their bike so I can see what it looks like.

Thanks
Here's a shot of a RS2 I'm test riding for a review, with a Bento on the the top tube, right behind the stem/steerer junction. It uses four velcro straps, two around the top tube, two around the steerer, under the stem, with a closure flap on top that also uses velcro to stay closed.
 

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Bacon!
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The bike is prettier than the Bento Box.

My wife swears by her Bento Box which is usually filled with tissues.
 
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