Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been thinking about picking up some stainless eggbeater pedals...I like the fact that they are light, 4 sided entry, and reasonable in price.

My only concern is that I'm not sure I'd be able to walk on them (not much walking about a little), and I'm not sure if they'd work well with my Shimano carbon road shoes.

I know they make road shoes but the reviews on those pedals/cleats aren't the best...

Any experience/advice?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
You mean road pedals, right? Well they also make road designed cleats, with little pontoons to help with walking in them, I know the ti version includes these with the pedals. I am not too sure about the stainless versions. I have not used them on the road but love them for cross. Good luck and enjoy.
 

· eminence grease
Joined
·
18,559 Posts
I switched both of my MTBs over to them, I was that impressed. Simple design, easy to get in and out of. I currently have a pair on my SS road bike as a test to see if they can be used comfortably for longer rides.

I also have a pair of their road pedals that I'm not trying to mount on MTB shoes for a touring bike, we'll see how that works out once I get done staring at the pieces and start carving the soles of the shoes. As far as walking in them - with road shoes they're similar to Looks - clop, clop, clop, on hard plastic.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
i'd stay away from the "road" pedals by crank bros...

i run eggbeaters on my three road bikes and i've put them on my girlfriend's two bikes also. (i also have a set of looks that i use on longer rides where i wont have to stop much or get off the bike much.)
she's a newbie, and she'd had a bit of a problem with spd-style cleats and pedals. she fell several times, as she had trouble getting out of those pedals. she would panic because of the difficulty, and down she'd go.
since she's been using the eggbeaters - about 9 months of riding, including the seattle to portland ride and the 72 mile version of lance armstrong ride here in portland - she hasnt had a problem. they are a breeze to get in and out of and they feel very solid when you're clipped in.
i bought and used a pair of their candy pedals - they have a small platform, in addition to the retention mechanism - but dumped them and went back to the simple eggbeaters. the addition of the small platform - crank bros.' road pedals and their candys have them - seems to defeat the best aspect of the eggbeaters. you really only have two entry points when they add the platform. with the bare eggbeaters you have real, live four-sided entry and that makes a huge difference.
the platforms seem designed to attract riders who might feel less than secure with the minimalist design. i imagine that some riders just feel better seeing something other than this oddly shaped set of small twisted metal bars on their cranks. based on my experience, the small platforms do nothing positive and actually hurt the function of the pedal.
get a pair of mtb shoeswith carbon soles. i've had a great set of shimano shoes that work very well. i know, i know, style points and all, but i'd give up a few style points for better function.
stick with the bare eggbeaters.
 

· Old enough to know better
Joined
·
720 Posts
I think the one thing basicly everyone has failed to mention here is that your road shoes may not be compatable with the egg cleats. The cleat uses a " 2 hole" style, two bolt holes beside eachother and ALOT of the shimano shoes i ve seen only use the standard 3 bolt pattern. The eggs bolts are pretty darn close together making for an over all very small cleat, if you get the "road cleat" it has rubber on both sides so you walk on the rubber and not the actual metal cleat. Much easier to walk in them Time, Ultegra or Dura Ace and even Speedplays as the entire cleat is like 1.5 inches. Take your shoes to your LBS and see if the cleat will work or not, if it dosnt buy new shoes :)

Deastin
 

· Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
good point...

what deastin has said is absolutely correct.
however, it its worth it, there are adapters out there that will allow you to use the two bolt cleat with a shoe that would normally only allow the traditional road cleat to be used.
about a decade ago i bought a pair of diadora's that included this type of adapter. its kind of funky, as it really does protrude about 1mm off the sole of the shoe - and then you attach the cleat to this adapter - but i was able to put an spd cleat on those road shoes. it worked, though i dont wear the shoes often because it doesnt work that well. i still keep them around to wear underneath my neoprene booties on really bad, wet winter days.
not sure where you could find one, or whether you'd even want to, but they are out there.
i'd opt for getting a nice pair of carbon-soled mtb shoes with very low-profile, minimalist lugs. shimano makes a really nice shoe that fits that description and i have a pair of sidis that also are very similar, though the sole is not carbon.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Hot spots on Crank Bros. Eggbeater Pedals?

Has anyone who has used Crank Bros. eggbeaters on long rides had any problems with hot spots? I don't think it would be an issue with stiff carbon soles on my road bike shoes but I thought I would ask.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
depends on the shoe...

i use four different shoes with my eggbeaters.
i have a pair of shimano mtb shoes - i think they are m151s -with carbon soles and i've done 80 miles, two days in a row, centuries, with those shoes and eggbeaters with no problems.
i have a pair of sidi bullets (i think: they are mtb sidis with two straps) that i've used on 60 and 70 mile rides with no problems.
i have a pair of lake mtb shoes that i usually commute in, i ithink they are x180's or something like that. if i ride over 35 miles or so with those, then i will feel hot spots.
i bough a pair of pearl izumi mtb shoes, dont know the model - they are black, with silver and the small, adjusting ratchet - but they have a super-stiff sole and though i havent ridden past 40 miles on them, i dont anticipate any problems.
i bought a pair of diadora cosmos from performance because they were dirt cheap at performance last year, and i've retired those dogs after only about 4 rides. they are so soft, its like wearing bedroom slippers. i could feel the cleat through the sole after about 15 miles.
the moral of the story is that if you get a good pair of carbon soled shoes or another similarly-soled shoe, you shouldnt have any problems.
i will acknowledge, however, that i do have a set of shimano carbon-soled road shoes and look pedals that i only use for rides over 60 miles or so, where i am just getting on the bike and riding, usually out in the country. i bought them last year to do STP and i do have to acknowledge that there is nothing like a look pedal - or a look-type pedal for stability or power transfer. at least in my experience. the cleat is just such a godawful hassle, if you're riding in or near a city and getting on and off the bike or having to stop at lights. especially if you're on steep hills. its no fun to have to plant your foot down on a steep city street and feel your foot start to slide.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Trevor Ash said:
Two different shoes on eggbeaters, 2000+ miles on them, no hotspots ever.
Well that's good to hear. I'm considering switching back to regular, bare-bones eggbeaters on my road ride and was wondering about that same thing. I'm using the CB's Quattro SL's right now and basically got 'em because I use the bare-bones eggbeaters on my MTB. I liked the ease of use, simple engineering, 4-way entry and figured it'd be an easy transition and shorter (read, safer) learning curve. But... as stated earlier, the addition of a platform does reduce my click-in options from 4 to 2. Now I just need to find some benevolent soul to pony up and buy the Triple Ti, 185 gram per pair, $399.99 msrp. for me.;)

-Nealz
 

· Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
love my eggs...

i think they're great as i have them on all my bikes... also great in that all my shoes have the cleats, and will work on any bike, including my mtn, single speed mtn, and road bikes... so when i'm commuting, i use my old pair of shimano carbon soled mtn shoes, have sidis for road riding and a cheap pair of nike mtn shoes for tooling around...

never had any hot spots and no problems walking, actually easier to walk in these than any other cleat i've tried... and for commuting, using my mtn shoes works really great, no problems there...

only downside i've ever heard really is the width of the pedal and cornering if youre a crit racer... but i'm not and have never had any issues cornering...
 

· Banned
Joined
·
608 Posts
I use eggbeaters on my MTB. After thousands of miles on them the only bad thing I have noticed is that the retention bars will eventually wear two grooves in the soles of your shoes. This will make the cleat a little sloppy, and in the end I think I'll have to either throw away the shoes or get another type of pedal. I really like the pedals but I do not typically think of $250 Sidi shoes as a consummable that needs to be replaced every couple of years; Sidis usually last forever.
 

· Steaming piles of opinion
Joined
·
10,520 Posts
Think Quattros

The road pedals, that is. First, despite other's comments, you give up nothing with them, save a bit of weight. You still have the real benefit of 4-sided entry - if you miss front, you can slide your foot back to engage, and vice versa. No other pedal system is this easy to engage.

The 'platforms' don't really do much, IMO. But the road pedals do have a better bearing system than the regular eggbeaters.

Quattro cleats with the plastic surround are great off-bike. Far better than the "pontoon" cleats. Note that you can use the Quattro cleats with regular eggbeaters, if that's your pref.

Quattro cleats are now available in both spd and look drillings, so you can have one that fits whichever shoe without adaptors. Recommendation: If you have spd drillings, use them. The look cleats are a tiny bit heavier and fussier.

Don't sweat hotspots. Has nothing at all to do with pedals and cleats. That is first a function of shoe fit. Folks often have too narrow cycling shoes, which cramp the metatarsals. Or, they get shoes that are too long in an attempt to find width, putting the curve of the sole in the wrong place and causing the toes to overwork, causing cramping. Second cause is cleats fitted too far forward, resulting in constant overwork of the toes, causing the cramping that is called 'hotspots'. Third cause is too flexible soles, though any name-brand road shoe is plenty stiff enough. Miss on any of those, and any pedal will cause hotspots. Get those things right, and none will.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Sidi dominators never had a hot spot not even in 24 hour mtb race solo, lake phat cat mtb shoes, no hotspots after 12 hr mtb rides. I agree i upgraded to sidi's after i wore two marks from the bars in the sole of my lakes. It is starting to happen to the sidi's, but with new cleats the shoes and pedals feel like new. get the standard 4 sided entry CB as they are the lightest and quattro's will IMO not really help the percieved hot spot problem.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top