Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Eager Learner
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to pick up a nice little 2-man tent, just for me. Perhaps a solo tent, even a bivy-type if pressed hard enough. I would like enough room to sit up in if possible.

I've seen some tents like this one from Eureka (Zeus) that is a 'single-wall' tent. wth happened to a good ol fly? I guess it's a weight-savings thing for bkpacking, but what about condensation? I like it if it works, but I hate to have the dew of the world hanging inside my tent.
http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___24216

The others I'm looking at include:

Eureka Spitfire and Spitfire 2:
http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___28317


Good ol' Eureka Timberline
http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___40324

...and their Solitaire
http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___23888

I'm not hung up on Eureka, it's just where I started looking...and we have a family-size Eureka tent already.

The Solitaire is inexpensive and light, but you can't really do anything but sit up in it.
The Spitfires are tall enough it seems to sit up in.
The Timberline is proven (some people say zippers suck), but the domes give more space near walls.
The Zeus? Single-wall?

Thoughts/experiences?
 

·
No hero that's understood
Joined
·
6,100 Posts
If I'm going to pitch a tent, I always make sure that I have a fly.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,071 Posts
Get the biggest, lightest tent you can.

I got a dana designs Nuk Tuk many years ago after getting tired of being bugged in and hunched over for a week straight. It's a 4 person pyramid tent with a single pole. It's simple to set up, it's got a ton of room and it's much lighter than the 4-season tent it replaced (though it, too is 4 season).

And, now that I've gotten older and gotten myself a family, it's big enough for me, my wife and our daughter.

It's big enough for me to pull a bike inside to work on it. If you live where there are great hoards of blood-thirsty insects, this is a plus.

Single wall tents are great for lightweight-ness, no so much for ventilation.

My Nuk Tuk is all mesh with a waterproof fly, and there are times when even with the fly completely off that it's still too warm at night. Can't imagine what it would be like on a hot humid windless summer night if you couldn't take the fly off.
 

·
Custom User Title
Joined
·
760 Posts
My single suggestion is the Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2. It's worth the coin. It's light, fully mesh, with a separate fly, which makes it super breathable, and just awesome during a low-humidity, dry night.

To fight condensation, full mesh and a separate fly is about as good as it's going to get. I'm in FL, and humidity and condensation will ruin an otherwise nice night.
 

·
Custom User Title
Joined
·
760 Posts
The other recommendation is a hammock. I have a Warbonnet Blackbird with a traditional Snow Peak tarp hung asym, and it's very nice. I like it better than the Seedhouse.
 

·
still shedding season
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
Small, super-lightweight tents are great until you're stuck in one for longer than just overnight. Bad weather day with not enough room to sit up unless I get out wouldn't be my idea of a good time. Bivy? Not for me.

I'm a kayaker and weight isn't a huge deal, so I have a two-person Sierra Designs just for me. Plenty 'o room but more than any backpacker would want to carry; depends on your use though. One solo I might check out would be the MSR Hubba. Been around for a long time, big vestibule, good reviews and pretty tall for a solo. It's also free standing which is nice, since you can unstake it, pick the whole thing up and shake the sand out of it before packing it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I've been happy w/ the quality and size of my Big Agnes Sarvis SL1, but if were to replace it, I'd get something like their Copper Spur UL1. No pole sleeves make pitching it easier, and the side door and large vestibule address my only complaints with the Sarvis.
- Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Don't get a single wall tent unless you're mountaineering and paying the money for something along the lines of a Bibler tent.

This is my favorite tent- http://bigskyproducts.com/Big-Sky-Evolution-2P-shelter.aspx

Decent space for a two person backpacking tent, double-walled, rainfly goes all the way to the ground, plenty of ventilation, two doors/vestibules, window, and it weighs a hair over 3 lbs with stakes/guy lines.

The aforementioned Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 is also a nice tent, and I would have probably picked one up if I didn't share my tent at times.
 

·
Good news everyone!
Joined
·
5,452 Posts
I have spent more nights in a Timberline as a youth than many people have camped total in their entire lives. They were good tents 10 years ago, but I can't speak for their quality today. I've had good luck with Eureka. I have a North Face Rock 22 now and it is crap quality by comparison.

Edit: I have also checked out that Big Agnes Seedhouse tent myself and really liked it. I saw it set up at a gear store and it looked really functional and well laid out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,745 Posts
Stay away from single wall unless it's very dry air (aka not humid) where you camp.

Assuming you're not doing any winter stuff I like the MSR Hubba.

As for size it depends where you go. Obviously more size is nice but if you're out bushwacking there's big value in having a tent small enough to set up pretty much anywhere. So it's a matter of give and take there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,745 Posts
Jim311 said:
Edit: I have also checked out that Big Agnes Seedhouse tent myself and really liked it. I saw it set up at a gear store and it looked really functional and well laid out.
I didn't like it at all. Kind a pain to get in and out of compared to a side vestibule and the head room sucked but the biggest problem is it requires something like 12 spikes to be set up properly. Not a big deal many places but where I usually camped there were just too many rocks to ever get a good set up.
 

·
Shirtcocker
Joined
·
60,639 Posts
mohair_chair said:
Go as big as you can stand to carry. The extra room is always nice.
True, but if you're gonna haul it on a bike or backpack you should go light. I have a single man tent from EMS--it has enough room to sleep in and a small vestibule area to stow gear. That's about it, but it's fine if all you need is a tent to sleep in and keep the bugs out. Kinda hard to get dressed inside, but there are always compromises to small and lightweight tents. Another plus is that it sets up and breaks down really quick.
 

·
floating around
Joined
·
371 Posts
I've got one of these for a solo tent http://www.sierradesigns.com/p-125-lightning-xt-2.aspx. I picked up a previous years model at rei outlet. Its great for me and my gear. I have room to sit up, sort through stuff, and could cook in the vestibule if its pouring rain. I haven't had any condensation issues with it (camped in a lot of humid areas). Also the double doors & vestibules means that if you have a friend, your stuff can go in the vestibules and 2 people could sleep in it. Though its a bit "cozy" for more than 1-2 nights with 2 people.
 

·
haole from the mainland
Joined
·
5,962 Posts
I have a Marmot Nutshell that I bought a 'footprint' for. I can set up the tent normally or I can go super light and just bring the footprint and raintarp, skipping the tent all together. I did that for a late summer backpacking trip in the Sierrras, although you wouldn't want to do it somewhere with mosquitos or if there was a good chance of rain.

If I were to get a new tent, I'd get one that has the footprint available. Hank Stamper mentioned MSR's Hubba already, and it and the Hubba Hubba both have the footprint option and have been rated highly by Backpacker magazine.
 

·
Shirtcocker
Joined
·
60,639 Posts
jorgy said:
I have a Marmot Nutshell that I bought a 'footprint' for. I can set up the tent normally or I can go super light and just bring the footprint and raintarp, skipping the tent all together. I did that for a late summer backpacking trip in the Sierrras, although you wouldn't want to do it somewhere with mosquitos or if there was a good chance of rain.

If I were to get a new tent, I'd get one that has the footprint available. Hank Stamper mentioned MSR's Hubba already, and it and the Hubba Hubba both have the footprint option and have been rated highly by Backpacker magazine.
I just carry a hunk of PVC tarp to put under mine. Works fine.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top