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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I thought no one would be interested in yet another ride report from Vienna, so I decided to mix in the first review of my new bike. Here it is:


It's a Mootour with YBB seatstay and an IF steel fork. Here's another look:


The bike was built for my split personality: randonneur on the one hand, climber/racer on the other. Chris Dimmick at Turin Bikes in Evanston did a terrific job fitting me--he and Jon Cariveau suggested a 61cm top tube with 5 degree of slope so that my torso be squarely over the frame. The idea was then for them to send the frame over here, and to transplant everything from my Lemond to the Moots, and finally sell the Lemond frame here in Austria. No one buys frames here in Austria, though. Plus my pal Oliver cut me a great deal on a mix of Campy Record (bottom bracket and cranks) and Chorus. Then the idea was for them to build me 32 spoke DT-Swiss wheels with Campy hubs, and fit the Rivendell Roly/Poly 27' tires on them. Of course that didn't come about, at least not for this weekend. Another hitch is that the IF fork is of the most unbelievably hideous color. I had asked for British Racing Green to match the Brooks Champion saddle, but got a kind ofpsychedelic peppermint green/blue. It's so utterly bizarre as a color that I'm actully beginning to think it might be cool.
To test the bike I decided to ride long enough so that I could tell from the pain what needed adjustment. For me that's about 80 miles, and for that kind of mileage it's good to head into Wine Country (Weinviertel) on the left side of the Danube.
First thing I did was to try the ascent to Our Mother of Grace (also known as little Lourdes) in Bisamberg. Why she hides out that high no one knows; in addition the last bit is big cobbles:


On my previous attempts I a) never made it up, and b) felt the bike lift in the front as I was pulling on the handlebars. No such thing here. Made it up with three full bottles and power to spare. Felt VERY good. But the bottom bracket was creaking. Would that be the infamous Record carbon desaster?

I soldiered on. This is what it looks like in Wine Country:


There were some serious climbs:


And some serious descents. The bike performed phenomenally. Climbing, let's face it, is a matter of strength. But descending (at least those long straight descents like here) is all bike, and you could feel how well balanced and precise it was. Steering was great, and I love the road contact through the fork.

Now we're about 45 minutes into the ride which is when on good days I get a backache and need to stop and stretch. It's a muscular pain, like a cramp, and I always knew it was from the fit. No pain. No pain (back pain, that is) the entire 6 hours of the ride.

Then I hit a major snag. In every little village I passed, I ran into scenes like these:


I screamed "out of the way, I'm testing my Moots", but no one moved. They're celebrating Jesus' first day in school or something, what with the kids and everything.
(To be continued...)
 

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You are wrong about that.

Beethoven said:
Well, I thought no one would be interested in yet another ride report from Vienna
As far as I am concerned you could post pix and ride reports of/around Vienna every day and that wouldn't be too much.
 

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Bacon!
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More pics is good!

With country like that to photograph you can drown me in the pics and I'd still be happy. I love those roads but the little kids create quite an obstacle.
 

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That's where I rode that day I rented a bike! Bisamberg! I rode up the hill and stopped at one of those little vineyards and drank some white wine. I was on a cruiser bike. I rode up the river, then turned inland and rode a dirt path along a smaller river for a while.

That bike is a dream bike for me. Moots, with the YBB (have one on my MTB), and the S&S couplers. You win!

Here's something to try: you can lock out the YBB with an allen wrench. Just tighten the collar and it holds everything still. It's a nice way to see what the softtail does. You can see it does make a big difference in ride. I think on a road bike you might want to lock it out occasionally. I am super curious exactly how a road bike would be with the YBB.

For the color on the IF fork: if you were more local I would send it back. They take pride in their paint, and they screwed yours up when you asked for a specific color match. You paid real money for that paint. However, seeing as you are so far away, I would just let them know so they don't do the same thing in the future for another customer. They might offer a discount on a future repaint. If you get some paint scratches down the road you could do the repaint.

Overall, awesome posts/pics/bike. Danke!
 

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The bike was built for my split personality: randonneur on the one hand, climber/racer on the other.

I'm trying to trim down my smart assed comments to one or two. I'll get back to you.

More importantly, how'd the date go? ;)

-BERNARDO

P.S. nice bike!
 

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I don't know about "Jesus' first day at school"...looks more like what is called a "confirmation" in Denmark (though they are Lutheran and Austria Catholic I believe?).

Neat pics. I am moving to Denmark this summer to live on the west coast of Jutland for a couple years. Your pics whet my appetite for European cycling. Not that there is anything "wrong" with Vancouver,Canada where I live now, just that it is time for a change!
 

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A Canadian in Sweden
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Welcome to the Moots club! The beauty of living in Europe is the mix of cultures on one continent. Enjoy the riding.
Cheers, Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Frankenmoots, pt. II

Well, with the kids out of the way, I headed towards the Weinstrasse, a 60+ mile loop through the vineyards, with little villages, wineries, and pubs. Here's one of my favorites:


It's called Zum Auge Gottes = The Eye of God. It seems to be mostly empty, though. Headed for Wolkersdorf, with more pageantry (yes, it's what's called 1st Communion). This is a typical village square, with the church on the left, and a Pestsäule (a column to ward off the plague) on the right:


I'm showing the Frankenmoots its first castle:

Back in wine country, I encounter this:

Turns out the area produces a lot of oil as well.
After more of this:


I'm getting tired, I'm now about 60 miles into my ride. No pain, just a bit exhausted, and as always despairing over my aspirations as a randonneur (shut up, Bernardo!). If I get exhausted after 60 miles, wishing nothing more than a hot bath, how am I going to do Paris-Brest-Paris?? Anyhow, I suddenly discover that the guys at the shop hadn't locked out the YBB!

Aha! Perhaps that's why the BB was creaking on the climb? Also, stuff is oozing out of the joint. I tighten it up and ride on. Totally different bike! Really stiff, much quicker response. Did I mention really stiff? For the first time since I had my Brooks, it begins to be, well, hard and slightly painful. I can't tell whether this was from exhaustion, but it certainly began after I locked out the YBB. Plus, it was one of those days where you always have a headwind--even though I rode a loop. Very tough miles at the end. Vienna is still about 15 miles away:


I made it home in one piece (the date went QUITE well, thank you Bernie), and felt good. The most important aspect is that the longer reach obviously eliminates the cramping in my back. Also, my knees are exactly in line with the pedals, and I feel that I'm using the right muscle (as I could tell from the burning). I no longer have numb spots on my feet and legs, as I used to get.
I always regarded the YBB as an option should I happen on trails that are unpaved (of which there many here and in Italy). I'm a little worried that the bike might be too stiff with the YBB locked out; on the other hand I realize that I was riding on a borrowed wheel and 23' tire inflated to 110 psi. Once I have my own wheels, I'm planning on running Rivendell 27 Roly-Polys at 90psi, which should make a big difference. I hope.
I switched from Shimano to Campy, and I do like the look. The shifting is pretty harsh, though, and the location of the levers is not exactly ergonomic. How do you shift up when you're in the drops?
All in all, I'm happy with the bike. It needs a bit of tweaking, but I'm afraid I've come to the point where 'it's not the bike' anymore. Sometimes I think I should have gone for one of those vintage steelies that you see here so often, but I would always have wanted a Moots, and I'm not exactly getting any younger. So I'll have to live with the melancholia of having got what I wanted. Pity me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey Philippe!

You're my hero! Because of you and your reports from the S&S Concord I got the Moots in the first place! I travel quite a bit as well, and plan on bringing the bike whenever possibel. You'll need to advise me when it comes to getting a case for it. Did you buy yours in Europe? Should I go backpack or hardcase?
I'm in Vienna until the end of June, then I thought I should hit some of the fabled Alpine passes: Sella, Silvretta, Brenner, Grossglockner--haven't planned out that part yet. As of August 15 I'll be in France, near Villeneuve-sur-Lot. It would be a pleasure to ride with you (although I'm decidedly below your level).
 

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I heart team Zissou!
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I went with the soft-sided backpack case and couldn't be happier. My colleagues on work trips always laugh when they see show up at the airport with a suit bag and my backpack. They can't get enough of the "James-bond" bike! Also, I think that when the outside pockets are loaded up w/ the rest of my clothes (riding gear, t-shirts, socks, etc...) the backpack bag is actually a more protective option for the bike since it "gives" while still padding the insides.

I probably won't get over to Vienna before the fall so I guess I'll just have to bookmark your reports for reference when I do go.

Have fun cycling in the Alpes -- I'll be over on the french side in July.

A+

Philippe
 

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Beethoven said:
Anyhow, I suddenly discover that the guys at the shop hadn't locked out the YBB!

Aha! Perhaps that's why the BB was creaking on the climb? Also, stuff is oozing out of the joint. I tighten it up and ride on. Totally different bike! Really stiff, much quicker response. Did I mention really stiff? For the first time since I had my Brooks, it begins to be, well, hard and slightly painful. I can't tell whether this was from exhaustion, but it certainly began after I locked out the YBB.
The oozing is lube, and is normal. just wipe it off with a rag. also, after a muddy ride, wipe it off and apply a drop or 2 (not more) of tri-flow.

the YBB creaks if the collar is neither tight enough for lock-out, nor loose enough for full travel. some say that adjusting the collar is like 'damping' the suspension, but then it will creak...

i believe the comfort you felt was the YBB at work, not the brooks or the tires or anything. if you loosen the collar, wipe off the shock, and go for a ride, you can see if you used the travel, there is often a little lube ring at the end of the travel.

i will ride sella this summer. well, i will ride in the area, and hope to ride sella. i will be in val di fiemme for a few weeks, at least.
i have driven grossglockner and brenner, and they would be an awesome ride. another one that looked great for a bike (i did it on a motorbike) was passo san bernadino, in the aosta region of italy, on the french border. it's near monte bianco, in the valsavarenche. basically any pass with a tunnel beneath it has less traffic and is quite scenic!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hallo JH,
I used the same Brooks on my previous bike and always marveled at how comfortable it was. With the locked out YBB it suddenly felt very hard. I want to ride with the locked-out joint as much as possible, and think that using a wider tire and less pressure will alleviate things.
Hey, maybe we can hook up for one of those rides? Check this out:
http://www.alpenrennradtouren.de/divers/top.html
I also have a book (Die 100 schönsten Alpenpässe), which gives a lot of detail.
I just wonder how hard it is?
 

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Beethoven said:
Hallo JH,
I used the same Brooks on my previous bike and always marveled at how comfortable it was. With the locked out YBB it suddenly felt very hard. I want to ride with the locked-out joint as much as possible, and think that using a wider tire and less pressure will alleviate things.
Hey, maybe we can hook up for one of those rides? Check this out:
http://www.alpenrennradtouren.de/divers/top.html
I also have a book (Die 100 schönsten Alpenpässe), which gives a lot of detail.
I just wonder how hard it is?
thanks for that link! i think the discomfort was relative. if you had started out with the YBB locked out, it would have felt comfy from the start. The YBB will be more comfy for sure, but perhaps less efficient. note i said 'perhaps". that is what i am really curious about. i think on a short ride/race, locked out would be less comfy but faster/more efficient. but on a longer ride (PBP), the YBB might make you faster overall, by preventing some fatigue. this is an ongoing debate in MTB racing. but overall, you see racers on front suspension bike for shorter races, and go to a full suspension for longer/rougher courses.

my goal this summer is the sellarunde. I have skiied it many times, and would love to ride it. We go to that area (my mother-in-law's hometown) every winter, but this will be my first summer.

we go to predazzo, which is past canazei. if i see the S&S coupled moots, i will shout 'beethoven', surely embarassing both of us!
 

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Omg, Helmut It's You!!!

Haha! I didn't know you post here! It's Anne from Turin! what a lovely report, and what a lovely bike! I'll have to tell Chris D.

I say instead of calling it a Frankenmoots, it's a HelMoots! A nice guy on a nice bike.

oh, btw, 'stuff oozing out of the joint' is just a dab of Phil Wood. The YBB is a steel coil and elastomer system, no goo to leak.

Anne B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hey Ann,

Chris will get a special mention when I've completely dialed in the bike and post a review. But his fitting is clearly the basis for this success!
What's 'a dab of Phil Wood'??
Oh, and thanks for blowing my cover!
I was actually thinking of changing my avatar to HelMoot, but it reminds me too much that a girlfriend used to call me Hell Mood. Me, friendliness in person!
 

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You and Valerie Plame

now have blown cover in common. Sorry! :)

Phil Wood is a green grease - Joe probably put a little bit in the YBB joint to lube that area of movement.

Ok, no ex-girlfriend reminders...how about MuellerMoots? Muelloots? Oh no! I've blown your cover further!

Do enjoy yourself!

Beethoven said:
Hey Ann,

Chris will get a special mention when I've completely dialed in the bike and post a review. But his fitting is clearly the basis for this success!
What's 'a dab of Phil Wood'??
Oh, and thanks for blowing my cover!
I was actually thinking of changing my avatar to HelMoot, but it reminds me too much that a girlfriend used to call me Hell Mood. Me, friendliness in person!
 
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