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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm reentering the bicycling world after a long absence. Due to an old back injury, I don't run anymore. I'm looking to get a new road bike for training and riding to work. I want to also do group rides and charity events. I may also consider duathlon (swim/run) in the future. Bike doesn't have to be a race bike, but I want performance and at least 105 group. I have two options that I really like. 2008 Fuji Roubaix Pro (MSRP is $1470, my price $1199) or 2008 Fuji Team Carbon (MSRP $2100, my price $1599). My debate is I wanted to stay under $2k for everything (helmet, shoes, pedals, shorts, etc). Roubaix Pro has aluminum frame with Carbon fork and seatstays. However, I wonder if CF will be better for my back (lumar surgery) in the long run. Roads where I live are not the greatest and I'll definitely run a wider tire (maybe 28mm). Will I REALLY benefit from the extra $400 of the Team? The only other difference in the 2 bikes is that the Team comes with Shimano R-500 wheelset and the Roubaix an Alex wheelset. All knowledgeable advice is greatly appreciated.
 

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... have you had opportunity to sling a leg over either or both frames?

Ultimately, it'll be your own sensibilities and needs that determine which is best... but I recently test rode both models mentioned (trying to help a bud buy a new bike) and leaned towards the Team Carbon for various reasons including ride quality (course, this is subjective).

Now, I can't get the old Tony Toni Tone song out of my head!!!
 

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Those Shimano wheels are not as bad as some reviews indicate. The 550's were spec'd on my Serotta Fierte and like you I wanted to remain under a certain dollar amount so I rode them 3K before replacing them.

I replaced them with Velocity Aeroheads that have the O/C feature. The difference in ride was dramatic. On rides that I had avoided sections that caused considerable road chatter I was now riding over without even noticing the rough pavement. I do not exaggerate.

The Roubaix Pro with the stock wheels credited and replaced with a better wheelset might be your best budget option. Colorade Cyclist offers DT 1.1 built on Ultegra hubs with DT spokes for $131-front and $158-rear. They would ride much nicer than either set that you mentioned and would be more durable.

Wider tires would smooth the ride also.

I strongly believe that wheel upgrades are the single best component upgrade, especially since you will have 105-level components which are good enough for anybody!

Carbon seat post may help also. I have not had the pleasure yet myself but may consider that for the future.
 

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naranjito
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The carbon frame will not be any better or worse for your back than the alu frame. A carbon seatpost won't help either. Carbon in itself does not provide any "comfort" benefits. What will make your more comfortable on the bike will be your position, so if the geometry of the two frames is different, then that might decide which one will be better for you. Once you have a frame that allows you a comfortable position, then the only other things that will aid your comfort will be fatter tyres (make sure the wheels and frame can take the size of tyre you want), padded or double wrapped tape, and saddle. Gloves, bibs and shoes can also help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That was my suspicion all along. Seems like people are jumping on the carbon bandwagon because the pros are using it. I don't desire the stuff they're riding ($5k+). I sold a motorcycle last year for $6k. I want good frame, good components, and a good wheel set. As long as it fits me, I think I'll be OK.
 

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I'll help you out!

Little Walter said:
Rode both. Team is in stock in my size. Roubaix Pro is one size too small and would have to be ordered. Team felt better. Trying to justify the extra $$.

This is how you justify the extra $$: This one time cost will save you bundles in the long run. The bike will feel better and therefore make you want to ride it more. This will save you on gas and car insurance - and maybe even a monthly payment if you ditch the car altogether! Also, the health benefits of riding more will save you money in hospital expenses and medicines. Finally, you risk wanting to "upgrade" to a nicer bike if you buy cheap now. Buying what you want right out of the gate will steer you away from buying another bike next year.

Don't cheat yourself. You want the Team so buy the Team!
 

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You know people place brand, aesthetics, material, color, cost, value and equipment in different priorital order. Of course you want the bike to feel, fit and ride well, that's a given, but if you are serious about doing the sport and see yourself liking one bike over another don't fret over a few hundred dollars, you are supposedly in it for the long run, get the one you think that you will ride and are willing to buy another wheelset for. Both of those bikes as well as alot of others would do fine, material in my opinion is moot. I have carbon road bikes as well as steel and the last few times I've been out on the bike, I've taken a steelie.

To answer your question, I agree with Tri Slow Poke, between the two I'd spend the extra $$ and get the Fuji. I think you'd be glad you did plus it's available now and it fits and is still within your budget.

Take care, keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Taking the plunge on the Fuji Team. :) I wanted the Shimano wheels. The psychological affect of thinking carbon might dampen the road some didn't hurt either. Plus, I want to train for the MS 150. My out the door price for everything (bike, helmet, shoes, pedals, shorts, jersey (free with store logo), gloves, computer, patch kit with CO2 and seat bag, upgraded saddle, and upgrade to 28mm puncture resistant tires was $2200 out the door. The bike at MSRP would have run me $2205 with tax. I was originally concerned about the fit (felt a little too stretched out). A shorter stem with a little more rise helped tremendously. After a few weeks in the saddle, I'll try to remember to submit a ride report if anyone wants. :cool:
 
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