Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
http://www.horriblyhilly.com/home.html

Registration opened today!!

It will fill up fast.
http://www.active.com/event_detail.cfm?event_id=127055

The Horribly Hilly Hundreds Challenge Ride delivers on its promise, weaving in and out of valleys untouched by the glacial activity that left most of the upper Midwest flat. Two challenging options await the cycling enthusiast; 100 kilometers and 200 kilometers, each with total elevation gains that make your heart race and your legs cry "uncle." Set in Southwest Wisconsin, the route starts in the charming village of Blue Mounds, in an area of strong Norwegian heritage (Biking like a Viking!). It makes its way west towards Barneveld, deceptively easy at first, until it climbs 600 ft on Mounds Park Rd, coming oh so close to the finish line — a line that you won't see for some time later. The ride winds back through the village of Blue Mounds and heads north to continue the fun. The course is hilly — horribly hilly — and manages to find every famous climb in the area: Barlow Road; Pinnacle Road; and finally, the last 3.5 miles and 900 ft up tortuous Mounds Park Road, into the park and all the way to the top of the Mound (just to mention three of the more than 40 significant climbs).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
See you there!

Me and Speedy signed up last night.

We're looking to finish with some small modicum of style... that's all. It's a buttkicking course. Getting in to top form by June17... that's the challenge.

Leading up to this, there is a time trial...
May 27- Bl'Huez Blue Mounds Time Trial

The big deal is training to be in great shape by June 17.

We're gonna be riding parts of the course to get ready... anyone up for group rides in spring?

'meat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Road it last year died on several hills.

I road it last year with a few friends. The false peaks killed me. I would power upto what I thought was the top of the hill to find out that I was only half way to the top and out of gas.

It is a great ride. I just purchased a new Giant TCR C1, this year I am not walking up any hills.


This ride will fill up fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Registration Full

As of yesterday, the registration has filled up. I can't hardly believe 1000 people signed up in a few days. Last year, it took 8 weeks to fill.... :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Last year people waited and got burned.

brewster said:
As of yesterday, the registration has filled up. I can't hardly believe 1000 people signed up in a few days. Last year, it took 8 weeks to fill.... :(
Last year only me and 3 of my cycling buddies signed up in time. The others said they would wait till the date was closer and decide. Last year a decision to wait and see was a decision not to go. People learned their lesson and signed up early. Remember last year the limit was 750. I have not check with everyone yet but so far this year 9 of my cycling buddies signed up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
A Truly Great Ride

The HHH is a great event and an insanely great ride, with nice people, great roads, pretty country, and a TDF-worthy finish. It busted me last year, and the weather was *nice*. Can't wait til June, just thinking about it is a great way to refocus on diet and weight.

For a small sample of the joy of it, check out http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=12852.

My prediction for the ride...
...

pain
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hhh

I really wish they would can the 100K option if they are going to limit the entries to 1000 riders. I rode last year and did not get the message for 2006 until it was too late.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Next year?

The description of the ride sounds enticing...

I'd like to try the 100k next year but am concerned that it would be unwise to use a road bike with a standard double chainring (53/39T) and a typical 10 speed cassette (12-25t). I really don't think I could make it up those hills with this combo. :eek:

Naturally, since I live in IL and very rarely see any hills at all, I figured I'd never need anything else around here...

What do you guys think of using a mountain bike with knobby tires for this instead? Yeah, it's definitely less efficient but at least the gearing is appropriate for riding up the hills, if not down.

What do others typically use for this ride?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Last year was the first time I did this ride and I too am from NW Indiana NE Illinois area and have the same gearing. I walked up most hills. Most of the hills have what I call false tops. I would think I was approaching the top and try to power over it. I would get to the point that I thought was the top and be only half way up.

It can be done with your current gearing, but did see a person, wearing tennis shoes and ridding really cheap mountain bike and he got up every hill. You will be spinning out of gears on the descents. If you do take your MB get slick tires for it.

If you want to see how you are going to do, go up to the area and ride up Mound Park Rd. You ride up part of the Road twice and it is a killer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
MTB OK, knobbies- NO, NO NO!

RoughRider said:
... I'd like to try the 100k next year but am concerned that it would be unwise to use a road bike with a standard double chainring (53/39T) and a typical 10 speed cassette (12-25t). I really don't think I could make it up those hills with this combo. :eek: ...What do you guys think of using a mountain bike with knobby tires for this instead? Yeah, it's definitely less efficient but at least the gearing is appropriate for riding up the hills, if not down.

What do others typically use for this ride?
I just rode to the finish line last Saturday after a 40 mile moderately hilly route from Madison, and I went pretty deep to get to the top with compact gearing- 34x27T. I was out of the saddle and working hard, hard hard for many many minutes. I'm training hard for the 200k, and I don't take finishing for granted. It's a rough course.

For the 100k, a MTB would be ok- especially if you are not dragging full front and rear suspension around with you. Look at NASHBAR, you can get 26" road tires that will do you a world of good... Panaracer Hi-roads, Panaracer S Licks or Schwalbe Marathons (heavier but nearly bomb proof touring tires.) You can get a set of any of these for less than the entry fee, if you shop around and use coupons.

I bet the average non-cycling god will be using a road or touring triple. I am getting strong, but I can see that Compact gearing won't leave me a bail-out option short of walking. I will most likely be riding a freaky frankenbike that I've been offered for the event- nice road frame and light 700c wheels with Diore XT mountain bike gearing. 5 People finished last year under 7 hours, 48 people finished under 8 hours, 140 under 9 hours... that is for 200km, and those guys are MONSTERS! I'll be happy if I finish, but have a secret goal of under 11 hours. Not so secret, I guess- anyone that finishes beats everyone who doesn't finish, though.

OK! So here is my route:

Semiole Hwy to Whalen to Verona
Sneak south out of Verona on Locust.
69 takes to north to Riverside, which climbs nicely to the west.
Turn right and burn all your altitude gain in one long sweeping descent, take Hwy G west.
G is kinda flat, you want to get on Messerschmidt, which has some fun rollers. There is a little stretch on 92, then you go up Malone, which has a decent pitch to it!

Then you climb in to Mt. Horeb on JG, which is a couple miles of pretty good climbing. You end up at the Quicky Mart, which has better than average food selections- bananas and bagels, for instance. OK! Take JG through Stewart Park, it's a twisty drop. JG turns from fun to a long grinding loop up to HWY ID.

Take ID west to Blue Mounds, and it's obvious where you are going. The first pitch is steep, the second pitch is steep and just keeps going. Nice facilities at the top.

Well, the way back to Madison EDIT!!! I FOUND A COOL ROUTE HOME! (vs the Midtown road suckfest):

Take HWY 78 north out of Mount Horeb, turn east on Hwy S and enjoy the magic carpet ride on the wide paved shoulder... fast downhill cruising!
Turn right on HWY P, because the fun on S is tapped out. (you can take S all the way back to town if you are fried-- only one gentle hill, it turns in to Mineral Point Road, so expect lots of trafic but your own wide paved shoulder. Survival bailout plan.)

OK, from P take the Klevenville-Riley Road to the famous Riley Tavern, short steep climb to the right... it's HWY J.

Take J all the way to P, then turn RIGHT, yes- you have to go west- the wrong way, for 1/4 mile. Then hook up with J going south. OOF! J has a major climb, then a major descent. (my spedometer said Max:42.5 mph after the hill)

You hook up with HWY G, which puts you backtracking on your outbound loop. G is ok. Turn right (n) on SpringRose... well, you had fun going down- it's not a bad climb, several stages nicely spaced out.

You get to see what you climbed on Riverside, and it's a nice view! Sheesh! Did we really climb that? Fast descent, wow.

And from there, it's pretty obvious how you get back. Don't forget to say "hi" to the Llamas. You know the ones.

If anybody wants to ride out weekends, give a shout here.
If anybody wants to meet at the park just below the state park for some hill climbing and touring a good part of the route, give a shout.

'meat

http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/travel/bike-foot/docs/bikedane1.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Thanks!

'meat,

Thanks for your advice and for providing your detailed route!

I have driven through portions of this beautiful area a couple of times and have really enjoyed it. I'd like to take my hardtail MTB (once I put some slick tires on) and try a portion of the route this spring to get the taste of riding there.

Currently I am training for a fairly flat 200k ride (Swedish Days) and don't see many hills around the Chicago area, so I won't even contemplate doing the 200k HHH next year. I'd like to try the 100k portion, though.

Best of luck to you and to all who are planning on tackling this year's ride!

I hope to join you next year...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Wright Stuff Century is still open...

The Wright Stuff Century is still open
http://www.bombaybicycle.org/wrightstuff.htm

Bombay (my club) puts on a really nice, well organized ride. It covers a lot of the same beautiful countryside and backroads, but avoids the murderous sadomasochistic climbs (some of which I look forward to being put over several times in June.) Wright Stuff is a good way to see a lot of the HHH course... so it's a challenging ride, without being a sufferfest. Also, it's at the end of the summer, so getting in shape is not such a pressing issue. Good food, lots of support, and you get to scout some cool geography.

I'll bet HHH is still looking for volunteers....

'meat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Tempting...

dogmeat said:
The Wright Stuff Century is still open
http://www.bombaybicycle.org/wrightstuff.htm

Bombay (my club) puts on a really nice, well organized ride. It covers a lot of the same beautiful countryside and backroads, but avoids the murderous sadomasochistic climbs (some of which I look forward to being put over several times in June.) Wright Stuff is a good way to see a lot of the HHH course... so it's a challenging ride, without being a sufferfest. Also, it's at the end of the summer, so getting in shape is not such a pressing issue. Good food, lots of support, and you get to scout some cool geography.

I'll bet HHH is still looking for volunteers....

'meat
You have piqued my interest once more! I am particularly interested in the century.

OK, I get that the route is easier than the HHH. Do many riders manage with typical (non-compact) double chainring road bike setup?

Can you share more details about this ride for the benefit of us flatlanders to the south?

What does the most challenging climb look like on this route? Has anyone measured the total elevation gain?

Since hills are plentiful in parts of this area, I would expect a fair amount of these. I enjoy rolling hills - they break up the monotony of a ride nicely and allow one to get in a nice rhythm. But there are hills and then there are climbs...

I ask this because I already got burned in January by tackling the Karst region of Puerto Rico on a whim and a road bike with a triple! The climbs aren't extremely long but some are astoundingly steep and will put some real burn in a muscle. :(

To get an idea of the geography, this is where the radiotelescope of the Arecibo Observatory is located. The bowl in which it sits is natural - not carved by humans. To put a scale on it, the reflector measures 305 meters across and is of parabolic shape.

I've added these pictures just by way of explaining where I'm coming from. I certainly don't expect to see these hills in Wisconsin (or in most places), but as far as hills and climbing are concerned, I have learned the hard way :eek: that preparation is the key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
dogmeat said:
The Wright Stuff Century is still open
http://www.bombaybicycle.org/wrightstuff.htm

Bombay (my club) puts on a really nice, well organized ride. It covers a lot of the same beautiful countryside and backroads, but avoids the murderous sadomasochistic climbs (some of which I look forward to being put over several times in June.) Wright Stuff is a good way to see a lot of the HHH course... so it's a challenging ride, without being a sufferfest. Also, it's at the end of the summer, so getting in shape is not such a pressing issue. Good food, lots of support, and you get to scout some cool geography.

I'll bet HHH is still looking for volunteers....

'meat
I've done the Wright Stuff several times and it's a great ride that's plenty hilly for the average rider. I've done it on a road bike and a recumbent racing trike. Who says bents can't climb? (It was easier on the road bike).

OK now the good news. I missed the HHH sign up, but now the cycling gods in Wisconsin have heard the call.

Check this out: http://www.dairylanddare.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Wow! Nothing like that...

Wright Stuff is not exactly a rolling party, but it's darned close. Great support, and tons of food. The hills do roll, though- being at the tail end myself.

All that techno stuff about route elevations... I don't have it. There are some good hills, but the sadomasochistic hills are avoided. As you said, it's about the legs- lots of people use doubles, but it won't be an easy sit and spin for ALL the hills.

I think anybody would like it- lot's of small towns, odd little farms, the Frank Lloyd buidings.. real nice.

'meat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
A taste of the HHH

The Blue Mounds State Park climb in the HHH is the hardest climb I've found so far in the midwest. The segment here at http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=113628 was taken from the route (the start runs covers the first 9 miles, and the end goes up Blue Mounds Park road right up to the hilltop finish.

I found it a brutal good time even on a triple last year, and in 2005 the temps were 10-15 degrees cooler (I'm told) than they werre in 2004. After 65 miles (or more) of hilly riding, you end with a mile and a half of hard climbing and 15-20% grade (I believe, from Google maps) near the end.

The HHH is my favorite ride - a nice September challenge held sadistically in June. Great people, great roads and gorgeous countryside. Can't wait...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
That is pretty much the exact route for the Alp Bl'Huez Time Trial event to be held on May 27th. http://bmtt.dyndns.org

It's a ~20K TT starting in Blue Mounds, running on ID to Barneveld, down K and all the way up Mounds Park road to the finish line at the top. Should be a real blast - if you like 40 minutes of pain.
 

·
Zeppelin/Ultegra Rider
Joined
·
930 Posts
sphinxcat said:
Should be a real blast - if you like 40 minutes of pain.
For some of us it may be somewhat more than 40 minutes of pain!
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top