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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist. Is he big and tall, tall and lanky, short and stout, or somewhere inbetween. I"m 5'5 137lbs and I was wondering does that leave me at some kind of disadvantage body wise to a rider with longer legs and more mass. Or am at more advantage, because I'm light and smaller?
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist. Is he big and tall, tall and lanky, short and stout, or somewhere inbetween. I"m 5'5 137lbs and I was wondering does that leave me at some kind of disadvantage body wise to a rider with longer legs and more mass. Or am at more advantage, because I'm light and smaller?
youre definitely at an advantage when it comes to climbing. i wouldn't be too scared of you in a sprint though. really, it has more to do with power wattage and good lungs. you could be a couch potato fred, or you could be king of the mountains. 2 people at the same height and weight will have very different strengths and weaknesses. george can climb with a lot of the smaller guys, and some considerably smaller than george are better sprinters than he is.
 

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Growing Older, Not Up
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Rum_Runner1 said:
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist. Is he big and tall, tall and lanky, short and stout, or somewhere inbetween. I"m 5'5 137lbs and I was wondering does that leave me at some kind of disadvantage body wise to a rider with longer legs and more mass. Or am at more advantage, because I'm light and smaller?
I'm far from an expert and several smarter people should be along to give you smarter answers. I'm guessing they'll want to know what type of riding you do.

Armstrong and Ullrich are both around 6 foot and 160-170 (tour weights). But they are relative giants in the sport. Other physical factors that set them apart, based on what I've read, are longer than normal femurs and high lung capacity. According to Bob Roll, this creates a package that allows them to climb as well as the pro riders your size and have the power to win a TT.

These are comparisons to the best in the world. I would say focus on your goals and getting yourself to the ideal condition to accomplish those goals.
 

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That's why cycling is so great

Different courses swing the advantage to different types of riders. Even different parts of the course can swing the advantage to a tactical rider's advantage. Nobody can be perfect so everybody gets a shot.

But a perfect rider would have high aerobic power and a good sprint, low weight, long legs, tactically smart, gutsy and would never give up. Think about Valverde in particular but there are many others.
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist.
The ideal cyclist should be about 5'10", weigh between 185 and 170 pounds, depending upon the season, and needs to be in his(or her) mid/late 40's. And he (or she) must love riding a bike.
 

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4bykn said:
The ideal cyclist should be about 5'10", weigh between 185 and 170 pounds, depending upon the season, and needs to be in his(or her) mid/late 40's. And he (or she) must love riding a bike.


I love your way of thinking!!!!
 

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4bykn said:
The ideal cyclist should be about 5'10", weigh between 185 and 170 pounds, depending upon the season, and needs to be in his(or her) mid/late 40's. And he (or she) must love riding a bike.
:) definitely the best answer here.
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist. QUOTE]

Two words:

Eddy Merckx!

Seriously, given some reasonable set of the required physical hand-outs and the required mental skills to make attacks count, know when to back off and all the other decisions that result in getting to kiss the podium girls (or guys, one supposes), the one factor that can drag you ahead when needed is a killer instinct drive to win that knows no limits.

That cyclist will love riding a bike, true, but more importantly, will have to be first. No arguments allowed...

Without that - and we've all come across the physical Doberman with the Poodle's aggressiveness - you will seldom cross the line first.

D
 

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gastarbeiter
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no such thing. just look at the smallest and largest rider at the TdF.

there's usually 30+cm difference, and 40+k's between the two.

that said, i'm happy i was too small for football in HS, otherwise i'd be walking around with steroid induced floaters like most of the [email protected] who played HS Football :)



Rum_Runner1 said:
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist. Is he big and tall, tall and lanky, short and stout, or somewhere inbetween. I"m 5'5 137lbs and I was wondering does that leave me at some kind of disadvantage body wise to a rider with longer legs and more mass. Or am at more advantage, because I'm light and smaller?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think what all you guys said makes sense to me, except the ideal cyclist being 40. That doesn't seem to me like the ideal age to be a winner. Seems like someone 18 like me would be at a better advantage since I usually mop the floor with you over paid over motivated cyclists that go out and buy a super sweet bike, but can't beat me on either my 1981 Fuji Royal (lugged steel nicest ride I've ever had), or my newer Fuji.
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
I think what all you guys said makes sense to me, except the ideal cyclist being 40. That doesn't seem to me like the ideal age to be a winner. Seems like someone 18 like me would be at a better advantage since I usually mop the floor with you over paid over motivated cyclists that go out and buy a super sweet bike, but can't beat me on either my 1981 Fuji Royal (lugged steel nicest ride I've ever had), or my newer Fuji.
Well, sure, if you're talking racing. You never said that in the original post. Just remember, unless you're something special there's likely a 50 year-old guy that can mop the road with you! It ain't me, but he's out there somewhere. There's an old guy in the town where my sis lives who'd be happy to show what an old guy can do. Name of Overend or something like that. ;) ;)

You may be able to beat me (us) in a race, but you aren't going to have more fun than I do.
 

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botto said:
...you plebes talk the talk, but in the end you have no clue how to pace yourself.
I'd hate to say it..that's true.
I've always admired the patience of the older guys in my club..
 

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gastarbeiter
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i'm not 40, or over. Nor am i over paid. But you are an @ss.

One thing an 18 year does not have, that someone 29 and older has, is patience and stamina. you plebes talk the talk, but in the end you have no clue how to pace yourself.

Rum_Runner1 said:
I think what all you guys said makes sense to me, except the ideal cyclist being 40. That doesn't seem to me like the ideal age to be a winner. Seems like someone 18 like me would be at a better advantage since I usually mop the floor with you over paid over motivated cyclists that go out and buy a super sweet bike, but can't beat me on either my 1981 Fuji Royal (lugged steel nicest ride I've ever had), or my newer Fuji.
 

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Growing Older, Not Up
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Rum_Runner1 said:
I think what all you guys said makes sense to me, except the ideal cyclist being 40. That doesn't seem to me like the ideal age to be a winner. Seems like someone 18 like me would be at a better advantage since I usually mop the floor with you over paid over motivated cyclists that go out and buy a super sweet bike, but can't beat me on either my 1981 Fuji Royal (lugged steel nicest ride I've ever had), or my newer Fuji.
Give it ten years, along the way you'll get married, have kids, and get a mortgage. Then you'll rethink overpaid. Of course, you may be the shmuck living in his parents basement til he's 35. :D
If you're really that good, you'd already be part of a junior pro team without the need to ask the question. If you have been, just admit you're trolling.

OTOH, just be thankful you found cycling prior to becoming an adult.
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
I think what all you guys said makes sense to me, except the ideal cyclist being 40. That doesn't seem to me like the ideal age to be a winner. Seems like someone 18 like me would be at a better advantage since I usually mop the floor with you over paid over motivated cyclists that go out and buy a super sweet bike, but can't beat me on either my 1981 Fuji Royal (lugged steel nicest ride I've ever had), or my newer Fuji.

kids...

son, respect your elders and shut your mouf
 

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cmatcan said:
youre definitely at an advantage when it comes to climbing. i wouldn't be too scared of you in a sprint though. really, it has more to do with power wattage and good lungs. you could be a couch potato fred, or you could be king of the mountains. 2 people at the same height and weight will have very different strengths and weaknesses. george can climb with a lot of the smaller guys, and some considerably smaller than george are better sprinters than he is.
You'd be a fool to not be scared of him in a sprint. Many good sprinters and classic riders are short, compact, and powerful. Paolo Bettini, David Etxeberria, Kirk Willet, etc... 137lb at 5' 5" is too heavy to be considered a classic climber type. If you look at the good climbers at that height, they'll range from 110-130 lb. Of course, sprinting and climbing is heavily determined by muscle fiber type and aerobic capacity, but weight does play a part.
 

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to sort of play off the "it varies" theory....

i don't think there's any such thing as an "ideal cyclist." i mean, a guy that is 5'2" and 110lbs is ideal for climbing, but probably won't be able to TT his way out of a paper bag. by the same token, a guy that is 6'0" and 170lbs would probably have plenty of power to do well in TTs, and might be considered "ideal" for that discipline, but would suffer like a dog on the climbs. i would dare to say that, unless the cyclist in question wants to be a specialist in a given discipline, the "ideal" cyclist would be some compromise between the two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hahaha, you guys make me laugh. I said that partly to get a rise, and on the other end to be an ass. Ok I meant that there are the older guys that spend more on rims than my bike and end up with a 7000 bike and .01 body. Yes there are the fast old guys that is totally a fact. I have been beaten once by one. He wickedly kicked my ass. We were on a climb and I was haha I got this dude. I smoked him then like 5 min later he passed me cause I lost some pace because of the climb. It taught me a lesson that I need to be more patient. My main point though is when you break it down to just the body a younger man has a better chance. Now I'm not a good sprinter, but that comes down to just raw power and the older guys I've ridden against don't have it.
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
What is the ideal body type of a cyclist. Is he big and tall, tall and lanky, short and stout, or somewhere inbetween. I"m 5'5 137lbs and I was wondering does that leave me at some kind of disadvantage body wise to a rider with longer legs and more mass. Or am at more advantage, because I'm light and smaller?
crap, guess i wont be in the tour again at 6', 200 lbs. AS if that were the only thing stopping me. I'm tired of racing the clydesdale division in mountain biking too, THis spring my goal is to get back down to a "thin" 180 by may.
 
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