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Yo no fui.
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With the heart if the classics season coming up, I can't help but feel a bit disappointed that there really isn't a true climbers' classic. Even though Amstel and Liege have their hills, we're always left to speculate with the so-called "pure climbers." All the racers who can really climb gamble their whole careers on the Tour or maybe the Giro, where lesser climbers are often left to win a stage on a long break because the arguably better climbers are fighting the GC war. This seems especially tragic with the recent and worsening devaluation of the polka-dotted jersey.

Even though all the true climbers would no doubt prefer to save their energies for the grand tours, I can't help but with we had the true climbers line up for a one-day classic.
 

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Pablo said:
With the heart if the classics season coming up, I can't help but feel a bit disappointed that there really isn't a true climbers' classic.
Classique des Alpes. Not included in the Pro Tour. Dead now. Thank that power mad would-be dictator Heinz Verbruggen.
 

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Pablo said:
With the heart if the classics season coming up, I can't help but feel a bit disappointed that there really isn't a true climbers' classic. Even though Amstel and Liege have their hills, we're always left to speculate with the so-called "pure climbers." All the racers who can really climb gamble their whole careers on the Tour or maybe the Giro, where lesser climbers are often left to win a stage on a long break because the arguably better climbers are fighting the GC war. This seems especially tragic with the recent and worsening devaluation of the polka-dotted jersey.

Even though all the true climbers would no doubt prefer to save their energies for the grand tours, I can't help but with we had the true climbers line up for a one-day classic.
There used to be one, La Classique des Alpes. Held in June, it died out in 2003. But the true climbers are the ones who hold out for a stage in the Giro and Tour. The best climbers are not the winners overall, as Pantani's trouncing of Armstrong in 2000 taking 50" in one climb illustrates. Pantani, like most pure climbers didn't have the luxury of a team protecting him all the way to the foot of the last one or teo climbs.
 

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You are right. Clásica San Sebastián is close, but still does not suit the pure climbers.
But .. Flèche Wallonne... Cunego could win.
hmmmm.

Pablo said:
With the heart if the classics season coming up, I can't help but feel a bit disappointed that there really isn't a true climbers' classic. Even though Amstel and Liege have their hills, we're always left to speculate with the so-called "pure climbers." All the racers who can really climb gamble their whole careers on the Tour or maybe the Giro, where lesser climbers are often left to win a stage on a long break because the arguably better climbers are fighting the GC war. This seems especially tragic with the recent and worsening devaluation of the polka-dotted jersey.

Even though all the true climbers would no doubt prefer to save their energies for the grand tours, I can't help but with we had the true climbers line up for a one-day classic.
 

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Pablo said:
Even though all the true climbers would no doubt prefer to save their energies for the grand tours, I can't help but with we had the true climbers line up for a one-day classic.
While there are no mountain top finishing classics, there are any number of classics that favor a climber over the more typical rouleur type of classics rider; LBL, Fleche-Wallone, and Tour of Lombardy.

I think you don't find too many climbers focusing on one-day races because they are tactically and luck-wise poor bets relative to the sure thing of stage racing.

That being said some climbers do take part in one-day races and even win them. Cunego won Lombardy and Virenque even won the "spriner's classic" Paris-Tours despite the decidely non-climbing profile.
 

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Lombardia my call as well

don't they climb the Gavia? Amstel and FW both climb to the finish, FW's Muur de Huy pushes 15% or more in most places. as much of a Mtn Top finish as you need IMHO
Claasiques De Alpes was a good one indeed
 

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atpjunkie said:
don't they climb the Gavia? Amstel and FW both climb to the finish, FW's Muur de Huy pushes 15% or more in most places. as much of a Mtn Top finish as you need IMHO
Claasiques De Alpes was a good one indeed
I forgot that they moved the Amstel finish to the Caulberg. I think the route of Lombardy is somewhat variable. Also San Sebastian contains the Jazekbial (sp?) cat. 1 climb near the finish and usually is where the winning group goes clear.
 

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classiquesklassieker
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Pablo said:
With the heart if the classics season coming up, I can't help but feel a bit disappointed that there really isn't a true climbers' classic. Even though Amstel and Liege have their hills, we're always left to speculate with the so-called "pure climbers." All the racers who can really climb gamble their whole careers on the Tour or maybe the Giro, where lesser climbers are often left to win a stage on a long break because the arguably better climbers are fighting the GC war. This seems especially tragic with the recent and worsening devaluation of the polka-dotted jersey.

Even though all the true climbers would no doubt prefer to save their energies for the grand tours, I can't help but with we had the true climbers line up for a one-day classic.
I actually thought about this before, and here are my thoughts.

Suppose that one were to "start" a new one-day race which ends at the top of a very high mountain, say col du Galibier. There are a few issues here:
- Who will be daring enough to start a breakaway?
- Since it's a one-day race, it doesn't matter the finishing times, just the finishing order.
- How do you get a few thousand fans to want to line up around all the cols?

The best classics are that way because the parcours invite breakways, and some exciting racing. In the first high-mountain stages of the grand tours, most of the favorites goggle the stage wins up because they are watching one another and because they all think that they have a shot at winning the overall. It's only later into the stage race that the non-GC guys are allowed to get away and take a shot at winning. Try applying the same concerns to one-day races and I think that it makes for boring racing.

The high-mountain stages of the grand tours are exciting partially because there are many guys with different goals, which may or may not conflict with each other. It's great watching Indurain gun it and towing Bruyneel along, because the former wants time, and the latter wants a stage win. If one uses the other as a spring-board for some great racing, even better.

Plus, in a one-day race, the non-climbers will just quit half-way. What's the point of finishing a one-day race well behind in the finishing order?

Moreover, one reason that the classics are the way they are is that the location is convenient for vacationing. Going up col de la Croix Fer just to see one potentially boring race is not that much fun :).
 

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For the next giro di Lombardia (historical 100° edition) it's still probable the inclusion of the mytical:
MURO DI SORMANO see here
With this 'supersteep' climb (2Km at 15% ) situated at 40Km to the finish line the race would be really favorable for the pure climbers...
 

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Liege-Bastogne-Liege is by far the hilliest classic - over 3500m of climbing and most of it in the second half of the race, it either goes up or down, but very little flat. The TV coverage doesn't quite to justice to what is one of the best courses to ride and probably why many riders consider it to be the best race.
 
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