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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
the Lynskey is done ** Added review**

Finished up the build today. I built it up with Campy Potenza , FSA post, stem and bars, and DT Swiss old-school 32-spoke wheels. Hoping to get a short ride in tomorrow with the winds of Hermine. Before anyone chastises me, yes ,I know I forget to close the brake lever before the picture. I will post a review once I have some miles

Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel Bicycle fork


I had a chance to get out and ride since Hermine decided to stay to the east and here’s my initial impression. First some data on the Build

Lynskey R240 frame (XL) and Pro #2 fork
Campy Potenza group with medium cage derailleur and 11/32t rear cassette
FSA seatpost (carbon), Bars and stem
DT Swiss R1.1 rims (similar to the 440) with 14/15 spokes, laced 32 each wheel
Vittoria Rubino tires 25c

So the bike ended up weighing 19lbs 10oz with this build. That is quite a bit more than I expected. My wheels are fairly beefy (2000 grams) so you could easily lose some weight there if you are a lighter rider.

My initial reaction was: I was not blown away. The ride wasn’t all that different from one of my steel bikes. I wasn’t disappointed; it’s just that nothing magical happened. I did not feel the desire to scrap my steel bikes and ride nothing but Ti forever.

Lynskey markets this as an all-day riding bike for the non-racer. I expected it might be a bit flexy. That was definitely not the case. Even under my 190lbs the bike felt quite rigid. I was not able to cause any flex in the bottom bracket area with an out of saddle sprint. There is some noticeable muting of bumps in the rear. I am not sure if that is due to the thinner seatstays, the carbon post, or both, but it did provide some added comfort on rough roads. Handling wise I would call it stable and steady. Words like “twitchy” or “nimble” don’t really apply. I did find it confidence inspiring in the corners and felt comfortable with it right away. Some might even call the handling slow but I think this is what Lynskey was going for.

Build quality – the welds were clean and neat. No issues there. This has nothing to do with the build but I really don’t like the tapered steerer. Maybe it adds some stiffness but it just looks chunky to me.

I am looking forward to doing a much linger ride with some hills to seeing how it handles that.
I will post a separate review of the Potenza group in Components
 

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Interested to hear your impressions of the frame and Potenza group.

I never did figure out what the BB shell was on that frame. PF30 or BSA? If PF30 what did you end up doing?

What was the fork again?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interested to hear your impressions of the frame and Potenza group.

I never did figure out what the BB shell was on that frame. PF30 or BSA? If PF30 what did you end up doing?

What was the fork again?
It uses an old school BSA BB. I used the Lynskey #2 fork
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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I like it....just lose the GSC10 sensor pack and get Garmin's magnetless sensors :)
 

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a newbie contacted me through my vintage road bike components advert on craigs this past weekend asking for a quill stem and cinelli bars for his new Lynskey. he said he wanted it to "look more vintage." B^)

instead of describing the differences in stems, i should've just recommended honey fizik tape and a brooks.
 

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Nice Ride. I have an R240 disc on order as a back up ride to my Lynskey Helix Pro Disc. The Pro is a bit Racey and just the ticket on some days, but I think the 240 will be perfect on the other days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nice Ride. I have an R240 disc on order as a back up ride to my Lynskey Helix Pro Disc. The Pro is a bit Racey and just the ticket on some days, but I think the 240 will be perfect on the other days.
I rode a Century this past weekend on the Lynskey. It gave a comfortable ride even with some rough pavement. I am definitely warming up to it
 

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OP does all that photo setup and then he leaves it in the small ring :p

Seriously, looks like a very nice, reliable bike.

I'm not sure what you were expecting out of Ti. To me the main benefit of Ti over steel is corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance allows an unpainted finish which is far more durable than paint. Other than that (and maybe a few ounces of weight), Ti and steel are very comparable.

Also, 19 pounds for a bike that big and with those wheels sounds great to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OP does all that photo setup and then he leaves it in the small ring :p

Seriously, looks like a very nice, reliable bike.

I'm not sure what you were expecting out of Ti. To me the main benefit of Ti over steel is corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance allows an unpainted finish which is far more durable than paint. Other than that (and maybe a few ounces of weight), Ti and steel are very comparable.

Also, 19 pounds for a bike that big and with those wheels sounds great to me.
I did not know photos in teh small ring were a no-no. Noted for next time

I am not sure what I was expecting either. This was not a thought out process on my part. I never had a Ti bike, saw one on ebay, put in the minimum bid, and now I have a new bike. Although rust has not really been a major issue on my steel bikes, I do like the idea of not having to worry about scratches and paint chips
 

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nice bike!

I too just built a Lynksey 3 or 4 months ago. I like it a lot. But it came out to be about 22 lbs in the XL size w ultegra and fulcrum RQ wheels. So about the same as my 25 yr old campy/steel racing bike. The Lynskey is stiffer and more responsive than the old steel bike, and a lot stiffer when climbing out of the saddle than my former 2007 S works Tarmac. I do not feel it is noticeably more comfortable in terms of road vibrations than my other bikes though - such minute differences felt imho.

The curved seat stays seem like they should provide more compliance. maybe they do or not, I can't tell. I do notice the much more lax angles than my former Tarmac, in a good way.

but mine shifts gears sometimes out of the saddle in 3rd/4th cog??? Roadlink involved though

I really like how Lynskey put the gear cable stops right at the head tube, with cool looking alu adjusters there which can easily be reached while riding.
 

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Nice bike. I have never ridden on Titanium and as far as I know your the first person that I have heard even say something about it. Well I have never ridden on aluminum, carbon or bamboo. Just steel bikes. Currently Columbus Spirit OS.

I think the Ti finish would be great as my bike is only 3 years old and it has a number of chips from rocks and stuff. At 10 years it will be fairly chipped up. My last bike was a Steel Allez and it had a cable guide on the top tube right in line with a river of sweat. It was rusted heavily after 30 years of riding. It probably had 30 more years however when I donated it. Anyway congratulations of the nice bike. Enjoy it.
 
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