Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You don't have to convince me that it's cool/necessary/in my best interest to have multiple road bikes. I'm sold on that approach and could appreciate having another (I only own one, my very first road bike, a Bianchi Sempre with 105 and Ultegra parts and upgraded wheels).

My question is this: How do I consider the criteria for the second bike? Should it be significantly different/better than the first? In other words, I don't think I want "road bike redundancy." I've test ridden a few other brands, but honestly, they don't feel much different, if at all different, than what I've already got. I'm talking strictly road bike here (I'm set with mountain bikes, as I was a mountain biker for years before getting into road biking). I was thinking a more aerodynamic frame (loving the Cervelo bikes I checked out recently), but would love more input on what to consider. What say you, wise forum constituency?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Well, what do you need? Nothing? Then don't buy a bike.

If you feel you need an aero frame, go for it. If you just think a stupid internet joke rule is something you need to adhere to, then buy me a bike instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Gotta agree with Mook...without a purpose, why spend the $$?

I currently have a nice comfort/hybrid bike for putting around family rides and a race road bike for going fast for no reason at all. For the moment, the race bike (Spec Tarmac) will be my "everything outside of the family ride" bike. Eventually, I'll save up enough $$ to get a Roubaix for longer rides but that's off in the future...say 2+ years.

I may decide along the way that my Tarmac is good enough for both fast/hard and endurance riding...if that's the case then I'm done and there will be no "n+1" for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Well, what do you need? Nothing? Then don't buy a bike.

If you feel you need an aero frame, go for it. If you just think a stupid internet joke rule is something you need to adhere to, then buy me a bike instead.
^^^^^ this

I have a road bike and a commuter bike. That's all I've had since my kids quit riding on the back of the tandems (and we sold the tandems) more than 15 years ago. I have never felt the need or desire for a second bike as the road bike does what I need for riding on roads. If I did CX I would get a CX bike. If I wanted to buy speed in TTs I would get a TT bike. Etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Try to escape the consumerist mentality, and appreciate (and ride) what you have.

So many people like to collect so much crap, and then hardly use it.

Put that bike money into a retirement or education fund, and ride the existing one.
 

·
Carbon Fiber = Explode!
Joined
·
3,438 Posts
Well, what do you need? Nothing? Then don't buy a bike.
For shame, this is the worst advice I have ever seen given on this forum about bicycles no less!

For buying new bikes, any bike that you desire no matter if inferior/superior in price to your current steed qualify for the n+1 rule.

Never tell people to not buy more bicycles. That's like a sin.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JasonB176

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
For shame, this is the worst advice I have ever seen given on this forum about bicycles no less!

For buying new bikes, any bike that you desire no matter if inferior/superior in price to your current steed qualify for the n+1 rule.
Well that's just it. The guy seems to have no desire or need. He just wants us to tell him where to throw his pile of extra cash. And to the best of my knowledge, that extra cash would be of much more benefit to me than him.

It's not like he's pining over a vintage Pinarello, or is looking to step up his game to make the jump into the next racing category. Dude just has a bunch of money and no direction :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Well that's just it. The guy seems to have no desire or need. He just wants us to tell him where to throw his pile of extra cash. And to the best of my knowledge, that extra cash would be of much more benefit to me than him.

It's not like he's pining over a vintage Pinarello, or is looking to step up his game to make the jump into the next racing category. Dude just has a bunch of money and no direction :)
Ha! I just saw 'need new bike' and skipped the rest.

You may have a point.

Yesterday, after I picked up my new bike, I went to another store in search of a part the other shop didn't have, and...I may have found my next new bike!!! A Surly Ogre, no less! Perfect. I can turn it into a well-handling tractor with trekking bars. Only 1500 dollars...OP, send that bike fund this way! :)

Seriously, ride something that doesn't remind you of you current steed. A cyclocross? A serious road hog like the Pina? (Try it, you'll understand. Thing is a beast disguised under a pretty Italian name). Maybe an Ogre? Or a little Troll? That's assuming your mb's aren't rigid steel fr ame designs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
For myself, my aluminum bike is great but n+1 would validate the need and want for a carbon steed. Maybe a different brand or comfort bike to fill a much. Maybe even a carbon version o my race. Bike would be great. But if I did not have any desire I would buy nothing. I really want a Colnago but that is just me. I think most people on here like the n+1 because they do want more bikes. They all have a feel all their own and different look and a certain amount of look at me appeal to us
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
If you live in a seasonal climate a CX bike is great. I use mine to rack up the winter miles.
I dont think there is a reason to just get another bike....if you find one that has a lighter stiffer frame, better components, more aggressive position, elec shifting or all the above and you ride a lot it can be great. If you have a basic bike and just get another basic bike you will have gained a backup but nothing else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,381 Posts
As one who has strictly abided by the N+1 rule, I can only say, that if you're already satisfied with your recreational road bike, then you're definitely going to need either a commuter bike, or a nice touring bike. Also, every cyclist who lives within a large urban center, absolutely needs a beater bike for those occasional downtown trips to the library, movies, or restaurant. So therefore, checkout the Raleigh Sojourn, the Marin Four Corners, the Jamis Coda, the Cannondale Bad Boy 9, the Cannondale Quick 4, and the Surly Ogre.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
A Surly Cross Check feels like a combination road bike and around town bike to me that can be taken off road. Not really a Cyclocross, more a Tri-cross. I tested one a couple of times and liked it, but ended up with a CAADX. This is why the Ogre appeals to me, though, because of bike redundancy.

If your current bike is carbon, look at steel. I love steel, grew up on a Schwinn Le Tour, and don't quite understand why I don't own a nice steel roadie. (Oh yeah, test rode a Pinarello and it was all over).

:D

Jamis makes a steel road bike called the Quest that is nicely spec'd for a good price. And their flatbar version, the Coda, was a great suggestion, too. The nice thing about the Coda is it's available with disc brakes.

And then there is the Surly Long Haul Trucker touring bike, also available in a disc version.

Salsa makes a lot of similar bikes to the Surly line, cost more, and I believe they are a little lighter weight, and handle better. So that depends on your budget, I guess.
 

·
Hucken The Fard Up !
Joined
·
3,983 Posts
A man owes to himself to own a Colnago ( or several ).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
While I wouldn't buy more bikes just to have more bikes, I have three now, a nice Seven road bike, a Leader mountain bike and a Schwinn Stingray for cruising to the local coffee shop 4 blocks from home. I'd like to get a single speed bike for commutes and crappy winter rides so I don't have to be so paranoid about riding the Seven on salt covered roads in winter, and I may try cross racing this fall so that adds another to the stable. Any more than that and I'll be in S-1 territory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
I've enjoyed riding the nuanced differences of the various frame materials - aluminum, steel and titanium. I enjoy all three plus the old aluminum serves as my beater bike for rain rides and all through the salty winter.

If nothing else, getting a second bike would allow you to have one that you don't mind using in less than ideal conditions.
 

·
Where's that GPS?
Joined
·
3,117 Posts
n+1

I travel a fair amount - not always easy (or cheap) to transport a bike to my most frequent locations.

My Solution?: Have a bike in each harbor. I have a bike at home, another in Europe and am thinking about getting one I can leave up in Maine - which I visit a couple of times a year at least. Cheaper in the long run to buy one and leave it than to rent one - last time I rented one in Maine it cost $700 - and that was for a Trek! :D
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top