Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,609 Posts
Except for that stem. That's the ugliest thing that I've ever seen.
It's Cannondale's answer to the Roubaix. Or vice-versa. These are good bikes for guys/gals that can't be in an aggressive race position for hours on end.

What bothers me is the continued marketing of the disc brakes. I don't think it's catching on. I think there are 2 riders of the 190+ rider field at the Tour on disc brakes, that is telling. I was at my LBS and I asked the sales rep (this is a Cannondale and Specialized dealer, so you know they have plenty of disc brake-equipped road bikes) how their disc sales are faring, and she said very little interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Synapse Cannondale Bicycles

The "Midnight" 105 version and "Acid Green" Ultegra versions look pretty nice.

It's very comparable to the Trek Domane SL Disc 105 and the Roubaix Elite:

Synapse Carbon Disc 105 Cannondale Bicycles

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/...-sl-5-disc/p/1447000-2018/?colorCode=grey_red

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/men/bikes/road/performance/roubaix-elite/115487

It would be interesting to see if Cannondale was able to achieve a similar level of comfort without the Isospeed or Future shock and to compare the acceleration and climbing chops on the three bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They also offer one rim brake bike. Trek provides you with a rim or disc brake choice at almost every level. Specialized is all in on discs as well for their endurance bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,609 Posts
Specialized is all in on discs as well for their endurance bikes.
Just not wise, in my opinion. Once you buy a disc-rigged bike, you're committed to disc wheels only for upgrades and you can't use those wheels on your other road bikes (or even CX bikes) assuming they're rim brake-equipped. It's fun to swap wheels among the bikes in your fleet or upgrade, etc. I can see why discs are a good choice if you live in a mountainous area with lots of descents, but otherwise ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,580 Posts
I own two bikes with discs, and two bikes with rim brakes.

I was fairly non-committal on discs until I actually spent some time on them. Now that I have two seasons on discs, I won't be buying another rim brake bike. And any future wheel purchases will be disc wheels with convertible hubs. 160mm front rotor and 140mm rear as well.
 

·
Forever a Student
Joined
·
4,963 Posts


I like the hidden fender mounts.



The straight seat stays look weird on this bike.

The geometry is very similar.

The rim brake one on offer is the previous generation, only disc on this new generation.




Not for me, will continue to enjoy the curvy stayed rim brake one.

My frame is 935g, so 950g or whatever is pretty good with the fender mounts and disc brake layups and paint and such. Probably quite stiff too, I think the last one is said to be stiffer than the evo. Power pyramid and all of that jazz.

A lot of people will probably like it, solid bike.

Oh, the bars and stem? Uh... Well... They're not one piece at least. I hear they're comfortable in the hands (the tops). Again though not for me. Standard cockpit here please.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
I like this and will have to give it a demo. I'm leaning towards the new emonda SLR, and yes with discs because I do live in a mountainous region and once had a tire overheat and blow off...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Has anyone had an opportunity to see one of these in person or test ride one yet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Unless somebody has ridden one at a press release, then I would think not. They are not even due to start shipping to dealers until about a month from now.
You might be surprised by how resourceful some of the folks on here can be. Some of them work at and/or own bike shops and others have contacts within the industry that often result in early test rides, early delivery, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
It's Cannondale's answer to the Roubaix. Or vice-versa. These are good bikes for guys/gals that can't be in an aggressive race position for hours on end.

What bothers me is the continued marketing of the disc brakes. I don't think it's catching on. I think there are 2 riders of the 190+ rider field at the Tour on disc brakes, that is telling. I was at my LBS and I asked the sales rep (this is a Cannondale and Specialized dealer, so you know they have plenty of disc brake-equipped road bikes) how their disc sales are faring, and she said very little interest.
Even the most so called 'relaxed' endurance bikes are anything but comfortable if you're going to be doing 4+, 5+ hours on a bike. Having said that a more aggressive position whereby the rider is more dedicated on all fours is a more comfortable position in principle than a sit up and beg position of relaxed bikes. Seems like a total gimmick to me. And if you're going to be doing those kind of hours on a bike then the very concept of endurance becomes pointless. Furthermore you couldn't just put in 4, 5+ hours on a bike from the get go without any sort of physical condition tapering. Regardless if its an endurance or full-on bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Even the most so called 'relaxed' endurance bikes are anything but comfortable if you're going to be doing 4+, 5+ hours on a bike. Having said that a more aggressive position whereby the rider is more dedicated on all fours is a more comfortable position in principle than a sit up and beg position of relaxed bikes. Seems like a total gimmick to me. And if you're going to be doing those kind of hours on a bike then the very concept of endurance becomes pointless. Furthermore you couldn't just put in 4, 5+ hours on a bike from the get go without any sort of physical condition tapering. Regardless if its an endurance or full-on bike.
I agree 100% that you have to build up to long distance/endurance riding, but some people clearly benefit from having a taller headtube, shorter top tube, lower bottom bracket, longer chainstays, and more compliance, etc. Even if those improvements are subtle (5-15mm or so), it can make a pretty big difference for the person that struggles with neck or back pain, needs/prefers a more stable bike on descents, gets beat up by too much feedback from the road due to prior injuries or age, is less flexible, needs to take as much pressure as possible off of the soft tissue in the genital area, etc. These bikes are some of the most popular from a sales perspective for a reason and it's not all hype in my opinion. They are not for everybody, but they simply work better for some folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
I agree 100% that you have to build up to long distance/endurance riding, but some people clearly benefit from having a taller headtube, shorter top tube, lower bottom bracket, longer chainstays, and more compliance, etc. Even if those improvements are subtle (5-15mm or so), it can make a pretty big difference for the person that struggles with neck or back pain, needs/prefers a more stable bike on descents, gets beat up by too much feedback from the road due to prior injuries or age, is less flexible, needs to take as much pressure as possible off of the soft tissue in the genital area, etc. These bikes are some of the most popular from a sales perspective for a reason and it's not all hype in my opinion. They are not for everybody, but they simply work better for some folks.
I totally agree. The idea posted above that claims the endurance bikes have no real substance is complete nonsense.

There are very real and material differences in the geometry (for ride quality of the bike as well as comfort for the rider ). The basic position of contact point for the rider relieve stress on the neck, hands, and neck to make it more likely to survive longer with less fatigue when compared to a "race" bike.

Couple that comfort aspect with the general trend of making the bike more compliant (via things like Isospeed, Futureshock, etc.) over less than perfect roads and you get a bike that is tangibly more comfortable to rider longer in the saddle.

Yes, you have to work up to longer hours in the saddle. That is not completely removed even with a proper endurance bike, but it sure makes it easier than a more aggressive design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I just talked to local shop and they reportedly have some 2018's in. :eek: I plan to stop by on the way home from work to take a peek. I will try to update on what I see and think tonight.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top