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Hucken The Fard Up !
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Definetly I don’t need another bike.

I have and the Bianchi 928SL and the Colnago EP as #1.a and #1.b bikes, and the C40 as the #2 for bad weather. Only a madman would be in the search of another bike.

What brought me to Colnago was Rasmussen’s Extreme-C, I simply loved that bike and its simplicity, black PR00 paint scheme, full DA 7800, DA 7800 carbon low profile wheel set, with Vittoria tubulars and a one piece handlebars/stem.



In fact my Bianchi 928SL was modeled after that bike, it has near all the elements, but the Extreme-C frame.

In my Internet wanderings I felt into an ad on an Italian Website offering a Colnago Extreme C in my size (56 traditional), 7800 build, DA wheels, Cinelli Ram bars. It was love at first sight. I contacted the seller and he gave me precise measurements, we are same height so the bike was setup exactly to the same measurements that I set all my bikes to. Too tempting. The bike was for sale in Ferrara Italy though and the seller wanted to sell it locally, pick-up only.



As I said before, only a madman would be in the search of another bike. And as I don’t have a wife like fabsroman I had nothing to stop me to go there and buy it. So I had to look for excuses and reasons why not to buy it.

I am a hobby builder and seller so I had a Bianchi 928L I built last winter, is a big bike, size 61 that has been for sale since the beginning of the spring and there was no real interest on it. The season is ending so it was very improbable I would sell it. So that was the perfect excuse, I then decided, “If I sell that Bianchi then I will buy the Extreme-C otherwise I will have to pass on it”.

A week went by, and by surprise two guys contacted me about the Bianchi, came to try it and finally one of them decided to buy it when I told him I had another guy interested on it.
So there were no excuses left.

I HAD TO go to Italy and buy it !

I planned then a long weekend in Rimini, one of the best Italian summer resorts, I coordinated with the seller to meet in Bologna that is on the way to Rimini and only 25Km from Ferrara, I decided to go by train and then use the bike there for a beach + cycling little holiday. I Picked the bike in Bologna and then followed to Rimini by train. I swaped the saddle by a Selle Italia SLC and well the bike has a compact, but with a 12-23 cassette so it gave a gearing range close to an standard.



Rimini is a great place; I had great times at the beach and at the vibrant nightlife that it offers. I brought my cycling clothes and could ride there from Rimini to San Marino, but it is mostly a flat area with lots of wind.

Here some pictures of the old town in Rimini

The Augustus door


The Tiberius bridge built on the 1st Century



pavé on the bridge


The Rimini old town is fully Paved. two kinds of pave though,
the old roman one.

the modern one


the theater place


the medieval castle



mmmm, Italian lunch


The beaches


Almost all cycling paths are paved. even those along the long marina



I was so welcomed by Italy, I even had an Italy shaped cloud on the blue sky :D


bikes are everywhere in Italy


on sunday I started my slow trip back to Zürich, as I had a bike I couldn't take the fast trains, only regional ones.... so it took quite a while


on the swiss train...


to be continued......
 

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Hucken The Fard Up !
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How it rides ?

I couldn't really test ride the bike in Italy as it should be riden.

Rimini is quite flat, and also I had my bags that were kind of heavy,

This is a bike that has to be riden on hills, but well when I could ride it on the flats without the bags, it felt agile and fast.

As soon as I arrived, I worked on it, cleaned it and oiled it, replaced the handlebar tape etc.



I decided to go on a ride on my usual circuit, but before removing the compact, I wanted to experiment with the compact to see if it was really better or not for me.

I set the 7850-C24-CL wheels on it instead of the 7800 wheels wich are aluminum and then a bit heavier. I could see the setup and the weight was very close to the Bianchi 928SL. However the 7850 have a 12-27 cassette instead of the 12-23 which was on it on the 7800 wheels.

the climb
I went on my usual circuit, the bike climbs very well, rides great, feels good, it's agile balanced and fast.

However I was kinda disapointed, I wasn't feeling an epiphany in comparison to my Bianchi. I expected a much better performance/feel.

I was a bit faster though, maybe that was due to the Compact?

During the ride I felt i was over-geared, I didn't need to go more down to 21 cog, I had the chain crossed often, however I decided to experiment "high cadence" and switched to the 24 and 27 to experiment.

It is probably that I am not used to that high cadence and that I would have to "learn" to do it, but it simply doens't feel natural to me, I prefer to go on 85rpm when I am feeling the resistance of the pedals that also is good for going off the saddle, than this fast but soft pedaling feel.

the descent

The descent was indeed the point where I got more disapointed, the bike descends quite nervously, not like on the Bianchi where you have a solid feel, like you are "descending on rails"

Maybe is because this is a climbers superlight bike and it doesn't have the mass to descend better ? Not really, it weights almost the same as the Bianchi ( and even a little more because the Bianchi has tubulars )

Maybe because there was a lot of wind ? strong wind that was bringing over big clouds ? I'll have to test it in descent without those winds....

the epiphany

well, I went back home kinda disapointed and decided to go and do the same circuit on the Bianchi, so I could compare them.

then it hit me.

The Bianchi, felt biger and slugish and unbalanced when off-the-saddle.

this was quite impressive. The Bianchi allways felt righ for me, its weight, its balance, its fit.... everything.

But now that I was comparing the Extreme-C which felt just right but "nothing special" before, now I could see how "off" was my Bianchi in comparison.

It was specially when climbing off-the-saddle that the Extreme C felt much, but much better.

The Bianchi still descended better, winds included.

I was puzzled when I got back home.

I measured both bikes, the setups are the same, the top tube, head tube, saddle to bars, saddle to crankset, saddle to front hub measurements are the same :confused:

Well there are some differences,

The Extreme C is traditional geometry, has lugs and thinner tubes and has a "recessed" down top tube, so this yields an smaller front triangle. The Bianchi is monocoque, has oversized shaped tubes and has sloping geometry.

My guess is that the Extreme C, has a geometry fine tuned for climbing and a quite different weight distribution and geometrical center ?

I went back home and set up the standar on it, so I could go up the hills again on my usual gearing.



unfortunately the wind brought quite a lot of clouds and it just started raining.... it has been raining all day long today so I will go tomorrow to test ride it.

This time I will set up also the tubular wheels and go for a real test :idea:
 

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What a great story!!! I'm impressed.

I was wincing when I saw the rear reflector and the bike lock (thank God the cable was wrapped in plastic!)

I could see myself running to Europe for a woman, but for a bike??!!

Bravo for your tenacity!
 

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You've got a little way to go to catch up to me in the bikes category. Let's see:

Bianchi FG Lite
Colnago Arte
Colnago Oval Krono
Colnago Cristallo
Colnago C50
1985 Mino Denti with 1985 Super Record
Cannondale CAAD5 sitting at my in-laws with Centaur/Mirage
Colnago Arte (extra frame sitting in a box painted like my Cristallo)
Colnago Master X Light (arriving pretty soon)

The first 5 are built with Campy Record 10. I also have Zipp 202s, 303s, 404s, and 808s in the garage with a plethora of other wheels and rims hanging and sitting all over the place. My wife gave me the green light last month to buy a pair of Campy Shamal tubulars for the C50, but I passed. I'm going to build a set of wheels for it that will be 200 grams lighter.

With all that, I still want an Extreme C in WXIN. Damn good write up, damn good decision to buy the bike, and damn you. LOL I'm jealous that you had a Colnago to ride while in Italy. That is the one thing I continue to kick myself about after going to Italy in 2001, spending 3 weeks there, with one of the weeks spent around the Milan/Venice region and an entire day in the Alps in a car. I bought a Giro cycling kit while I was there, but never even thought about looking into buying a bike while I was there even though I had been looking at Colnagos on Wrench Science at the time and thinking I would never be able to afford one. If I had looked for one at a local shop, I probably would have bought it.

While I was reading the initial write up, I was saying "Please Lord, don't let it be a 54 or if it is, please let him have already bought it" because EITA would be my second choice in paint schemes other than WXIN and I have been looking for an Extreme C on e-bay just so I can see what a divorce feels like. LOL

If Colnago keeps putting out crap paint schemes, IMO, I might go with a newer frame with WXIN on it from Maestro.

By the way, my wife isn't the problem, it is the kids' college funds. I could buy 2 Colnagos a year, plus components, for what we put away for their college. If they don't go to college, we will be well off.
 

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fick said:
What a great story!!! I'm impressed.

I was wincing when I saw the rear reflector and the bike lock (thank God the cable was wrapped in plastic!)

I could see myself running to Europe for a woman, but for a bike??!!

Bravo for your tenacity!
Fick,

I wouldn't need much of an excuse to "run" to Italy. I had such an awesome time while I was there in 2001 that I would love to go back. However, the next time I go I am buying a bike there and riding through the Alps with it, or at least taking one of my bikes with me. IMO Italy is an awesome place to vacation. I could spend a year there and still not see everything I want to see.
 

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fabsroman said:
By the way, my wife isn't the problem, it is the kids' college funds. I could buy 2 Colnagos a year, plus components, for what we put away for their college. If they don't go to college, we will be well off.
True that!
 

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Hucken The Fard Up !
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@fick

there is no need to justify to run to Italy, Italy is a beautiful country with plenty of things to see, to do, to eat and to meet.

The only regret I have of my trip is that I brought too many things and the bag was too heavy, I could have stayed one day less at the beach and come back on the trains, stoping on several places on the Venetto or Lombardia to ride the bike.

But the bag was quite heavy and even though I could have done it with the bag, I was more worried about the bike ( I was like a clyde on the bike :D )

Next time, I'll come very light with only minimal stuff and go ride more, or maybe I would bring a touring bike instead and go fully loaded.
 

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Hucken The Fard Up !
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I went to do my usual circuit twice.

First on the standard and the clincher DA wheels yesterday and then on the tubular wheels today. In that way I could have a real feel and can evaluate how this bike performs.

The bike is simply great, it was born to climb. It is the reincarnation of an Ibex, seriously.

The bike climbs great, well balanced and agile, when on the saddle and off the saddle.

It descends also very well without those strong winds, more nervous than the others, but good.

On the flats it is agile and fast.

I am very pleased.

However a little detail. The handlebars are flared, they are a 42 at the drops but only 40 at the hoods.

Maybe this also gives a more agile feeling when off the saddle in comparison to a non flared 42 handlebars ? what do you think ?

I am close to proclame this bike as my #1.a, then I don't know what I would do with the others.... maybe sell the Bianchi the EP and the C40 and get a C50 ?..... we'll see.

some pics...


 

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Salsa_Lover said:
I went to do my usual circuit twice.

First on the standard and the clincher DA wheels yesterday and then on the tubular wheels today. In that way I could have a real feel and can evaluate how this bike performs.

The bike is simply great, it was born to climb. It is the reincarnation of an Ibex, seriously.

The bike climbs great, well balanced and agile, when on the saddle and off the saddle.

It descends also very well without those strong winds, more nervous than the others, but good.

On the flats it is agile and fast.

I am very pleased.

However a little detail. The handlebars are flared, they are a 42 at the drops but only 40 at the hoods.

Maybe this also gives a more agile feeling when off the saddle in comparison to a non flared 42 handlebars ? what do you think ?

I am close to proclame this bike as my #1.a, then I don't know what I would do with the others.... maybe sell the Bianchi the EP and the C40 and get a C50 ?..... we'll see.

some pics...


My Bianchi FG Lite has been collecting dust lately. For the most part, I find myself reaching for the C50 and then the Cristallo for training rides. In 2008 when I first got the FG Lite I used it for a couple crits and then went back to the Arte to see if there was a difference. Yep, the Arte just felt a lot smoother in every way possible. The rear end on the Arte didn't flop around all over the place like the FG Lite during a sprint.

I guess I am going to have to take the FG Lite out one day before it gets cold so it doesn't feel completely unloved. I cannot bring myself to sell it. Now, the Cannondale CAAD 5 is a different story. I absolutely hate that frame and might look for another "cheap" Colnago to build with the components from that bike.
 

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Great story Salsa_Lover. I bought my Extreme C about 5 years ago now and I love every minute I spend on it. I absolutely agree with you about its qualities on a descent and having come from a C40 I was frustrated by this for quite some time. I have, however persevered and now 'understand' the bike on descents and I'm sure you will find this too the more you ride it.

I holiday in Riccione, just along the road from Rimini, every May, staying at Hotel Belvedere, which is focused on cyclists in spring and autumn and provides superb service. Great area, lovely country.
 

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oldtrackie said:
Great story Salsa_Lover. I bought my Extreme C about 5 years ago now and I love every minute I spend on it. I absolutely agree with you about its qualities on a descent and having come from a C40 I was frustrated by this for quite some time. I have, however persevered and now 'understand' the bike on descents and I'm sure you will find this too the more you ride it.

I holiday in Riccione, just along the road from Rimini, every May, staying at Hotel Belvedere, which is focused on cyclists in spring and autumn and provides superb service. Great area, lovely country.
I have this one 500+ foot climb up a little mountain by me that I do all the time. When I got my Cristallo, I was floored by its ability to descend. Same goes for the Arte which is set up exactly like the Cristallo and has the exact same geometry. Now, the C50 is driving me crazy on this descent. It has a lot of quick turns in it and I am struggling to get the C50 on the right line, especially in a quick left, right turn midway down the descent. It just felt like complete poo at the beginning of the descent today, but it was starting to feel a little better right toward the bottom. I think it is just a matter of time on the bike to figure out the difference before it will be descending just as well as the Cristallo and Arte. I am sure the Salsa will get the descending under control as he puts more time in the saddle on the Extreme C.
 

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Salsa_Lover said:
I went to do my usual circuit twice.

First on the standard and the clincher DA wheels yesterday and then on the tubular wheels today. In that way I could have a real feel and can evaluate how this bike performs.

The bike is simply great, it was born to climb. It is the reincarnation of an Ibex, seriously.

The bike climbs great, well balanced and agile, when on the saddle and off the saddle.

It descends also very well without those strong winds, more nervous than the others, but good.

On the flats it is agile and fast.

I am very pleased.

However a little detail. The handlebars are flared, they are a 42 at the drops but only 40 at the hoods.

Maybe this also gives a more agile feeling when off the saddle in comparison to a non flared 42 handlebars ? what do you think ?

I am close to proclame this bike as my #1.a, then I don't know what I would do with the others.... maybe sell the Bianchi the EP and the C40 and get a C50 ?..... we'll see.

some pics...


Salsa,

You sure that is a 56 traditional because it looks really close in headtube length to my 50 sloping Cristallo, which is exactly the same as a 54 traditional?
 

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Great thread Salsa! But I gotta say, I must not know what I'm doing because I swear my Ext C is the best descending (IMO, Colnagos are the best descenders due to the ever so slightly slower/stabler handling ) bike I've ever ridden. I love my Fondriests but they don't descend as well. Neither did my Klein, Kestrel, or the others I've borrowed or test ridden.
 

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Hucken The Fard Up !
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
fabsroman said:
Salsa,

You sure that is a 56 traditional because it looks really close in headtube length to my 50 sloping Cristallo, which is exactly the same as a 54 traditional?
Yes it is a 56, fits me right I am 5'11"

The top tube is 55cm c-c the seat tube is 53.5 c-c, look carefully and you'll see the top tube is "recessed" that is, is lower than what I usually see. That yields smaller triangles but keeping the size as a 56.

I guess it is probably a custom made frame ? I will contact the previous owner to ask for. I haven't seen something like this on other size 56 pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ride-Fly said:
Great thread Salsa! But I gotta say, I must not know what I'm doing because I swear my Ext C is the best descending (IMO, Colnagos are the best descenders due to the ever so slightly slower/stabler handling ) bike I've ever ridden. I love my Fondriests but they don't descend as well. Neither did my Klein, Kestrel, or the others I've borrowed or test ridden.
probably, but my benchmark is the Bianchi 928SL so I am putting the bar a bit high for this bike :p

The bike is great, I am now riding it everyday. I would like to swap the handlebars to see if it is that what makes it feel dfferent, but I think it is more the traditional geometry that put the mass center on a better position for me. the sloping geometry surely puts it more in front and up.
 

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Salsa_Lover said:
Yes it is a 56, fits me right I am 5'11"

The top tube is 55cm c-c the seat tube is 53.5 c-c, look carefully and you'll see the top tube is "recessed" that is, is lower than what I usually see. That yields smaller triangles but keeping the size as a 56.

I guess it is probably a custom made frame ? I will contact the previous owner to ask for. I haven't seen something like this on other size 56 pictures.
Yeah, the 2008 catalog doesn't show that extension of the headtube above the top tube. Don't know what to make of it. However, a 55 c-c measurement for the top tube is correct for a 56 c-t frame. I just usually measure the headtube with micrometers to make sure the frame size is correct. Seems to be the easiest and most precise way to take a measurement and compare it to the geometry chart.

Glad to hear you are riding it a lot. I'm actually getting some decent saddle time on my C50 now.
 
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