Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So many questions.
It's this (if I do it): http://tour.diabetes.org/site/TR/TourdeCure/TDC460018030?pg=entry&fr_id=5623

So...
(1) Will I be able to train for it in time (I only ride about 300 miles per month on average atm)
(2) Should I get a brooks? (I've been thinking about getting one for a while)
(3) How can I tell if I have a good enough 'fit' on my bike?
(4) How do I get donations/sponsors/whatever it's called?
(5) Who the **** watches fox news?
(6) What kind of training stuff should I do before the ride?
(7) What kind of diet stuff should I do before and during the ride?

I've looked at some websites w/ training calenders and stuff but I wanted some actual experience from people that've done it. What works for you guys? How important is it to stick to those calender things? Like if I commute and the milage doesn't match up exactly day for day with the calender thing but the weekly milage is about the same, is that ok??:blush2: :eek: :confused: :idea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,238 Posts
Training should include some rides of at least 60 miles. If you can get where you're comfortable on a metric, you should be OK on a full century.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
203 Posts
You should have time

Unless you are planning on trying to do a fast century or the course is overly hilly you should have time to train. Mainly just ride at a good pace and increase your distances every week. Find a saddle that is comfortable for longer distances. Experiment with foods and beverages to see what works best for you. Charity rides will have some food available.

If fit is a concern you can go to a professional fitter. After going on some longer rides your body will tell you if you have major fit issues.

If you can do 80 miles then you can do 100. The last 20 are by far the hardest but the adrenaline of the finish line should get you through.

I just went to their website. They boast of a 1600ft climb. I live in the flatlands of Illinois so I have no idea how hard that would be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The climb shouldn't be too bad (although after 80 miles, who knows)... it looks like it's over quite a few miles and there's plenty of stuff steeper around here... How much time do they usually give for these?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,347 Posts
MWPDX said:
So many questions.
It's this (if I do it): http://tour.diabetes.org/site/TR/TourdeCure/TDC460018030?pg=entry&fr_id=5623

So...
(1) Will I be able to train for it in time (I only ride about 300 miles per month on average atm)
(2) Should I get a brooks? (I've been thinking about getting one for a while)
(3) How can I tell if I have a good enough 'fit' on my bike?
(4) How do I get donations/sponsors/whatever it's called?
(5) Who the **** watches fox news?
(6) What kind of training stuff should I do before the ride?
(7) What kind of diet stuff should I do before and during the ride?

I've looked at some websites w/ training calenders and stuff but I wanted some actual experience from people that've done it. What works for you guys? How important is it to stick to those calender things? Like if I commute and the milage doesn't match up exactly day for day with the calender thing but the weekly milage is about the same, is that ok??:blush2: :eek: :confused: :idea:
For this kind of training, the long ride you do each week is the most important. But if the schedule you use calls for a 65 mile ride and you do a 61 mile ride, it's not a problem. Just don't make it a 30 mile ride (unless that's all you have time for, then any ride is better than no ride). Most training plans have you adding to your weekly long ride until you get to about 75% of the goal distance. The rule of thumb is to add no more than 10% a week. During the week, do shorter rides a little faster than your long ride pace. Do intervals or sprints if you like, but they are not mandatory.

You don't need a Brooks for a century (I maintain that you don't need one for any ride, but then I am comfortable on modern saddles). You do want your bike to be comfortable for hours in the saddle. If it isn't now, then consider getting fit or addressing whatever is bothering you.

For the event, figure out what you need to eat during your long training rides. Don't experiment too much on the event, stick to foods that you know will work for you.

If you can find a metric or 50 mile century at the right time between now and the event, do that as a practice event.

The best book I have found for century riding and training is:
http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-Long-Distance-Cycling-Confidence/dp/1579541992
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OH!!! and should I get an actual jersey and some a' them fancy package-flaunting shorts??? As opposed to jeans (or cargo shorts) and a tee shirt?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
203 Posts
MWPDX said:
OH!!! and should I get an actual jersey and some a' them fancy package-flaunting shorts??? As opposed to jeans (or cargo shorts) and a tee shirt?
If you want to be able to feel your package at the end of the ride I would recommend it. If your package is too small to flaunt then mountain biking shorts may be more to your liking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
MWPDX said:
OH!!! and should I get an actual jersey and some a' them fancy package-flaunting shorts??? As opposed to jeans (or cargo shorts) and a tee shirt?
Definitely. At bare minimum, get something with padding for long rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,778 Posts
MWPDX said:
OH!!! and should I get an actual jersey and some a' them fancy package-flaunting shorts??? As opposed to jeans (or cargo shorts) and a tee shirt?
If you're a diabetic look into the Red Rider program. If you raise the money for the ride you get a Jersey, and it looks pretty good. It's a Primal Wear jersey.
I'm riding here in Illinois and signed up for the jersey and I think the only qualifications are that you're a diabetic and raise $150 or more.
Look to friends and family for donations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,778 Posts
The 63 mile ride should follow the same route as the 100 miler for the 1st half, so if 100 starts to look unobtainable you can bail out and do 63.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I've had a little experience training beginners

At the risk of making people angry, you should recognize that many people on this forum are hard core, experienced riders who don't remember being a newcomer.

1. As most have said, if you can do 70 or so, you can do a century.

2. Experiment with food early in training and stick with what works for you. To be safe do not eat anything different from your training food on your first century .

3. Get the stinkin bibs, saddle, gloves, shoes and pedals right during training and do not change anything for the ride. The little irritation you barely notice doing 25 miles in the cargo shorts will cut your ass on a century. They call it cycling clothing for a reason.

4. Resist the urge to go faster than your training pace at the beginning of the event.

5. Ask everyone you patronize (grocery manager, barber, stripper, preacher, bike shop owner), every person you know, and all your relatives to give you money. You'll make it.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
i did the century at Riverhead, NY last year. I trained outdoors one month beforehand and it was the first time riding a bike in a long time. The one month of training went like this, 25, 33, 50 and 75 miles before the century. I trained hard through spin classes two months beforehand. I even completed a 90 min spin class the day before which was the biggest mistake ever. thinking back i dont think my spin instructor had my best interests in mind. he was more concern about having numbers then my concern about resting the day before.

As for the ride itself. the first 50 miles were completed at a face pace. the last 50 miles were the worst 50 miles in the world. i was so dead that i had to shift to low gear and still had trouble peddling.

btw, dont forget to find hills to climb btw now and july so you can build up climbing endurance for that 1500 ft hill.

oh, i did a flat century the week after and no spin class the friday before and i had a blast.

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,524 Posts
Centuryx3 said:
2. Experiment with food early in training and stick with what works for you. To be safe do not eat anything different from your training food on your first century .

4. Resist the urge to go faster than your training pace at the beginning of the event.
#4 is very important. You might be tempted to ride faster during the first couple hours, particularly with the excitement of the ride and faster riders around. The extra effort you make early in the ride will cost you later in the ride. Ride your pace. Be deliberate. You will appreciate your foresight during the last 10-15 miles of the ride.

#2 Corollary A: Get used to taking in (eating or drinking) enough calories during a ride, and do it. You might have enough available energy in your body to ride up to about 3-4 hours or 50 miles, more or less. On rides shorter than that you can get away with not eating enough to replace the calories you burn because you already have enough in your body to get you through the ride, or almost all of it. After about 50 miles or 3-4 hours or so, you will have burned almost all your readily available calories, and starting to eat at that point can be too late. You need to be taking in calories during the first half of the ride to fuel you for the second half of the ride. There could well be times that you should be eating (even a little) even if you don't feel hungry.

#2 Corollary B: Get used to drinking enough liquids during a ride, and do it. Liquid requirements are weather dependent, but you will need to drink along the way of a 100 mile ride. Figure out how much you need, and drink that much along the way. There could well be times that you're drinking (even a little) even if you don't feel thirsty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
PdxMark said:
#4 is very important. You might be tempted to ride faster during the first couple hours, particularly with the excitement of the ride and faster riders around. The extra effort you make early in the ride will cost you later in the ride. Ride your pace. Be deliberate. You will appreciate your foresight during the last 10-15 miles of the ride.

#2 Corollary A: Get used to taking in (eating or drinking) enough calories during a ride, and do it. You might have enough available energy in your body to ride up to about 3-4 hours or 50 miles, more or less. On rides shorter than that you can get away with not eating enough to replace the calories you burn because you already have enough in your body to get you through the ride, or almost all of it. After about 50 miles or 3-4 hours or so, you will have burned almost all your readily available calories, and starting to eat at that point can be too late. You need to be taking in calories during the first half of the ride to fuel you for the second half of the ride. There could well be times that you should be eating (even a little) even if you don't feel hungry.

#2 Corollary B: Get used to drinking enough liquids during a ride, and do it. Liquid requirements are weather dependent, but you will need to drink along the way of a 100 mile ride. Figure out how much you need, and drink that much along the way. There could well be times that you're drinking (even a little) even if you don't feel thirsty.
Any good rules of thumb (rule of thumbs?) about how much to eat/drink and how often?? Or just see what works when doing the training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
You can figure this out yourself

MWPDX said:
Any good rules of thumb (rule of thumbs?) about how much to eat/drink and how often?? Or just see what works when doing the training.
Find a sensible food you like (again during training)-- PBJ Sandwiches, home made trail mix, cheese and crackers, meatloaf sandwiches, whatever. Eat in modest portions at regular intervals regardless of whether you feel hungry. I alternate trail mix or a quarter of a PBJ on toast every half hour and hit the hammer gel every 20 minutes. Other riders laugh at my large food supplies. But they are not me.

Also, drink on a time schedule before you are thirsty. I hit the water with the Hammer Gel every 20 minutes. This works for me. My best cycling buddy uses less than a bottle of water in 2 hours at 90 degrees and 90% humidity in South Florida summers. But that is an extreme exception just to illustrate that you have to find your own comfort level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,347 Posts
MWPDX said:
Any good rules of thumb (rule of thumbs?) about how much to eat/drink and how often??
Roughly, a bottle of water an hour. You'll need less if it's cold and wet, more if it is hot and dry.

For food, in distance races I aim for about 300 Cal/hr. Most people can handle 250 Cal/hr without getting sick. But you're on a century, not a race. So you can stop to eat, and if you eat a bit much, you can back off your pace for a while to digest.

Don't spend too much time at stops though, you will get cold and stiff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
managing Diabetes on a century

Hey all - since this is a Century to support Diabetes I have a quesiton for other Type I diabetics who ride -

A lot of the talk is about what to eat and how much to eat as it relates to cycling, but us diabetics also have to factor in the blood sugar levels and sometime have to slam sugar just to keep the numbers up - whether or not we "need" the calories.

My question for other diabetics is how do you manage the glucose levels?
Stop and test frequency
Most effective foods & drinks
Anything I else I need to know and consider

I've just started on the road bike and thinking about it I think I've been limiting the length of my rides to avoid having to deal with managing the diabetes out on the road. I'd like to stretch out and tackle something like a Century ride and would really like to hear from others about what they've experienced or tricks they've picked up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I am a Type 2

bothfeet said:
Hey all - since this is a Century to support Diabetes I have a quesiton for other Type I diabetics who ride -

A lot of the talk is about what to eat and how much to eat as it relates to cycling, but us diabetics also have to factor in the blood sugar levels and sometime have to slam sugar just to keep the numbers up - whether or not we "need" the calories.

My question for other diabetics is how do you manage the glucose levels?
Stop and test frequency
Most effective foods & drinks
Anything I else I need to know and consider

I've just started on the road bike and thinking about it I think I've been limiting the length of my rides to avoid having to deal with managing the diabetes out on the road. I'd like to stretch out and tackle something like a Century ride and would really like to hear from others about what they've experienced or tricks they've picked up.
And I am not a doctor. Hammer Gel is the least spiky product I have tried with respect to maintaining glucose levels. I also experience dramatics drops in blood glucose levels from intense exercise.

So I eat all the junk I want to on the bike.

YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Centuryx3 said:
At the risk of making people angry, you should recognize that many people on this forum are hard core, experienced riders who don't remember being a newcomer. ...........
Sure we do. That's the reason we enjoy saying "I told you so" when our excellent advice is ignored. :D

Your advice is sound.

After 20 years, I still have a problem being tempted to try new things during an event. But haven't yielded to temptation in awhile! You eventually learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,778 Posts
bothfeet said:
Hey all - since this is a Century to support Diabetes I have a quesiton for other Type I diabetics who ride -

A lot of the talk is about what to eat and how much to eat as it relates to cycling, but us diabetics also have to factor in the blood sugar levels and sometime have to slam sugar just to keep the numbers up - whether or not we "need" the calories.

My question for other diabetics is how do you manage the glucose levels?
Stop and test frequency
Most effective foods & drinks
Anything I else I need to know and consider

I've just started on the road bike and thinking about it I think I've been limiting the length of my rides to avoid having to deal with managing the diabetes out on the road. I'd like to stretch out and tackle something like a Century ride and would really like to hear from others about what they've experienced or tricks they've picked up.
I'm a insulin dependent type 2 and will test my blood at every stop on an organised ride. I'll also stop and check any time something feels like it's sneaking up on me. All these checks are done even though I'm wearing a CGM.

I've always got Cliff bars and energy gels in my pockets. I use Carb Boom gels and when the sugar starts dropping fast the gels dump about 25 grams of carbs into the ole system pretty quick. And I find the Cliff Bars to be easily digested. And on an organised ride there's always fruit, raisins, maybe PBJ or some such to eat at the rest stops. Also water for your water bottles.

The CGM is incorporated into my insulin pump and if you don't use a pump I Really Recommend you look into one. I can dial my basil way down during the ride and micro manage any bolus, if one may be needed. I'm talking tenths of a unit.
The Continuous Glucose Monitor May not always be in sinc with what a blood test will say but it points at trends so you can see whats coming.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top