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I was reading about ways to (help) pay for college and saw something about teaching in a "high need" school for a few years. It said if you teach for five years, they'll pay for all or part of your tuition/loans/etc. I still haven't looked into it in that much detail though.

Has anybody here done something like this? I don't ultimately want to be a teacher, at least not at the moment. I'm planning on either being a veterinarian or doing some sort of wildlife biology w/ the national forest people or something similar.
 

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"El Bwana"
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Someone else asked this very question about two years ago. I'll try and find the thread. Here are the threads.

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=146834&highlight=teaching

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=105953&highlight=teaching

Here's my response: Sister-in-law did it in NYC at a low-income, low performing school in the Bronx. She was an NYU grad in sociology, she also had a MA in Sociology and very idealistic. The State of New York paid for her to get her teaching credentials.

She taught K, 1, and 2. She *loved* the kids but ended up hating the bureaucracy, the teachers union, the principal, and a minority of parents who didn't want their kids being taught by "******". She lasted three years and fulfilled her obligations.

She still teaches, but in a disadvantaged school in Dade County.
 

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Former roommate did this in Brooklyn. There was often an empty wine glass in the sink by the time I got home from work. She said it was a "good day" if she wasn't bitten, kicked, or otherwise assaulted (think they were junior high school age.)

But she survived and is now teaching someplace upstate NY.
 

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your text here
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teaching can be a tough gig. and it can be very rewarding. as mentioned, its more the bureacracy of the deal. thats what did me in.
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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Paging Zeytin and A-in-E...They're in it right now.

My Mom taught for at least 25 years. She loved teaching first grade, where she could get the kids interested before they'd been ruined by some clock-puncher who didn't really care. But she taught that age, middle school, middle school special ed, you name it.

It was easier back in the 70s, when at least if a parent didn't care enough to actively help in their kid's education, they also didn't care enough to complain when he got bad grades. As of the late 80s and 90s, she was plagued with parents who expected their kids to automatically get good grades, even though they themselves never paid any attention to the kids or their studies (or even if their kids actually WENT to school) until report card time. And they were really angry when the bad grades came, threatening Mom's job, threatening the school, making accusations of racism, you name it.

The culture of entitlement and/or victimhood kind of ruined teaching for my Mom.
 

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You need to try substitute teaching first. If you survive that, you may find yourself unwilling to go on. Then you will know if teaching is for you. Don't go and teach for a tuition re-reimbursement or any other monetary benefit.There is no amount of money that could make teaching worth while. In my case, I just like teaching.
 

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Captain Obvious
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AIE said:
On behalf of all parents who love their children, please don't half-ass it.
^^^this

also, the several awesome teacher i've had in my life are some of the most memorable people to ever be part of it.
 

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AIE said:
On behalf of all parents who love their children, please don't half-ass it.
+2. If you don't want to end up being a teacher, don't bother. In my opinion, one of the biggest problems in education is people who go into it half-heartedly, thinking it's an easy gig and you get summers off, then realize the amount of actual work involved and bail. The problem is that they quit long before they stop going to work, so you end up with kids who aren't being taught and a classroom with a babysitter in it instead of a teacher. Your colleagues and your students will realize pretty quickly your heart's not in it, so you won't get the support you need to succeed from your coworkers (and you will need support from them your first couple of years) and your students will walk all over you. After a year or two if you and your students are lucky you'll quit and go to whatever field you want to be in.

That being said, I know people who have gone into teaching and absolutely love it, because it's their calling. The teachers I work with are some of the hardest working people I know, and have bent over backwards to try to not only help their own students but their colleagues' as well. You'd be lucky to end up in school like that. I was. I'm in my third year, just switched from kindergarten to 5th grade, and while it's a lot of work and some days I ask myself if I was crazy to think I want to do this with my life, when I see the light go on in my kids' eyes as they get something it makes all the crap worth it.

As far as the "getting your loans paid for" part, Teach for America is one program that will get you certified and some good training, but you're going to be teaching in some brutal environments and lately the competition to get those slots is pretty stiff. The feds will forgive some of your loans (up to $5K IIRC) if you teach for 5 years in a low income school or in a high-need subject area like math, but it's only $5K, not the whole ball of wax. There are grant programs out there also that vary district to district, I know some people that got their certification classes paid for by the district if they went into bilingual, you just have to speak a language they want.
 

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Hooben said:
You need to try substitute teaching first. If you survive that, you may find yourself unwilling to go on. Then you will know if teaching is for you. Don't go and teach for a tuition re-reimbursement or any other monetary benefit.There is no amount of money that could make teaching worth while. In my case, I just like teaching.
Yep. I did that. Also taught at a private high school for a year. Wasn't for me. I'd still consider going back to it when I'm older, but the classroom definitely wasn't where I wanted to be spending my time when I was in my 20s.
 

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half-fast
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My mother was a kindergarten teacher for something like 20 years, and she also says that the bureaucracy, among other things, really made life tough.
 

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Honey Smack!
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My wife teaches 1st grade. Her first year she spent well over 60+ hours a week at work. Don't go into it thinking it's a "I'll leave at 3:40 every day and get summers off" kinda job. Doing that will do nothing but present one helluva disservice to the kiddos. Fortunately my wife is an amazing teacher who cares deeply about each of her kids and is doing something she loves, and for the most part is in a pretty mild mannered school.
 

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jaded bitter joy crusher
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stuck said:
+2. If you don't want to end up being a teacher, don't bother. In my opinion, one of the biggest problems in education is people who go into it half-heartedly, thinking it's an easy gig and you get summers off, then realize the amount of actual work involved and bail.
This.

Back when I taught high school, I'd often sleep at the school because by the time I got done grading and preparing the next day's lessons, there wasn't enough time before school started in the morning to make it worth going home to sleep.

And I'd often be in on Saturdays tutoring the kids who were motivated but having trouble in class.

I got the summers off, but between actual contact time, correcting homework, preparing lessons, supervising student extracurricular activities, I was regularly pulling 80+ hour weeks for the other nine months for $15,000 a year.
 

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Fredke said:
This.

Back when I taught high school, I'd often sleep at the school because by the time I got done grading and preparing the next day's lessons, there wasn't enough time before school started in the morning to make it worth going home to sleep.

And I'd often be in on Saturdays tutoring the kids who were motivated but having trouble in class.

I got the summers off, but between actual contact time, correcting homework, preparing lessons, supervising student extracurricular activities, I was regularly pulling 80+ hour weeks for the other nine months for $15,000 a year.
As someone who's been a trainer in a corporate environment, and who is now studying the instructional design field in grad school, this seems pretty inefficient. :(

I have a friend who is an ex-HS teacher, and the impression I got from her is that teachers spend too much time putting together and fleshing out their own individual/custom curriculums. If so, then really there should be just a few ppl in a state or school district putting together a more-or-less common curriculum that teachers can then focus on delivering.

Of course, if the teacher wants to tweak/customize that curriculum to better meet their needs, more power to them. But it would seem that a teacher's time should be all about student assessment, evaluation, and delivery, not reinventing the wheel.

Am I missing something here/over-assuming? :idea:
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SystemShock said:
As someone who's been a trainer in a corporate environment, and who is now studying the instructional design field in grad school, this seems pretty inefficient. :(

I have a friend who is an ex-HS teacher, and the impression I got from her is that teachers spend too much time putting together and fleshing out their own individual/custom curriculums. If so, then really there should be just a few ppl in a state or school district putting together a more-or-less common curriculum that teachers can then focus on delivering.

Of course, if the teacher wants to tweak/customize that curriculum to better meet their needs, more power to them. But it would seem that a teacher's time should be all about student assessment, evaluation, and delivery, not reinventing the wheel.

Am I missing something here/over-assuming? :idea:
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As a 20 year classroom teacher with ISD experience, I feel that you are missing something. Every class, every day is different. One must remember that the recipients of this "delivered" curricula are varied in background, experiences, abilities, motivation, and intelligence. My collegues and I teach identical curriculum, but our classrooms and styles are as varied as the students that we interact with.
Too many people seem to think that teaching is simply inputting knowledge into children's heads; the reality is far from that. Really great teachers are the people who can get the most reluctant learners to be not only engaged in the classroom, but to have those same reluctant learners go and learn independently outside of school.
Sure, a teacher's time should be about assessment, evaluation, etc. Really it is about managing kids and establishing a trusting relationship with them so that they will have the confidence to extend themselves in future.
 

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foggypeake said:
As a 20 year classroom teacher with ISD experience, I feel that you are missing something. Every class, every day is different. One must remember that the recipients of this "delivered" curricula are varied in background, experiences, abilities, motivation, and intelligence. My collegues and I teach identical curriculum, but our classrooms and styles are as varied as the students that we interact with.
Too many people seem to think that teaching is simply inputting knowledge into children's heads; the reality is far from that. Really great teachers are the people who can get the most reluctant learners to be not only engaged in the classroom, but to have those same reluctant learners go and learn independently outside of school.
Sure, a teacher's time should be about assessment, evaluation, etc. Really it is about managing kids and establishing a trusting relationship with them so that they will have the confidence to extend themselves in future.
I understand and agree with much of this, and lest you think me solely corporate, I was a teacher's aide for awhile back in the late '80s, both for 'regular' kids and in a program for troubled teens who'd been kicked out of regular school. But, I wasn't the teacher, of course.

Thus, focusing on the issues you raise, how then would you go about making the use of the teacher's time more efficient, ideally? Or is that a near-impossibility, IYO?
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