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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am a commuter that usually posts over on C&T. I used to ride bikes a lot when I was younger up to age 22. Now 34 and been riding to work 16 miles RT since 8/05. And I am a cigarette smoker, a little less than a pack a day for 10 years. I don't smoke when I ride. Lost weight through riding and now considering quitting smoking, but not real sure why. Made an appointment for this Friday with the doctor to get a full physical and share my"secret habit", since I have never told him. I have never tried to quit before.

I ride alone on a fixed gear in the winter and tend to push pretty hard to and from work. I don't find it tough to ride in the winter, but all my family and co-workers think it's a big deal. My thought is if I can ride in this junk maybe I could quit smoking. I find that on the bike and about an hour after I don't feel the need. But, in the car driving thats another story ;)
I am a huge fan of the ULTRA sour candy and gum. My plan is to buy every kind walmart sells and try to substitute the candy for the smokes. Part of the problem is I can't find any good motivation to quit. I feel healthy and I don't get any heat from anyone about it.
Any ex-smokers have any advice? Any helpful success stories? Any roadblocks?

Thanks
MN Dan
Feel free to PM me if you don't want to post.
 

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"Thinking" about it but "not sure why"? WTF?

Full disclosure: I've never smoked, never been tempted, never understood why people do it. My mom was a smoker (died of cancer, by the way, after a long decline that nearly destroyed my father and the rest of the family), and even when I was 5 or 6 years old I thought it was a stupid thing to do.
Having said that, though: If you're just "thinking" about it, forget it. You're not serious about quitting, and you won't stick with it, so save yourself grief and guilt and just let it go.
But I don't understand how anybody who smokes can be unsure of why he'd want to quit. You can read, right? You can see smokers around you stinking and wheezing and coughing up blood? And you're "not sure" why might stop doing that?
 

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gastarbeiter
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i got into cycling when i quit smoking (just out of college). i did it cold turkey, after a few days of tapering down on how much i was smoking. the riding helped me from putting on weight (in fact i lost weight).

work took it's toll on the cycling, and i started smoking again, after being smoke free for almost 6 years.

started cycling (after a long layoff) 3 years ago. as stupid as it sounds, i still smoked, but managed to do fine in the races i was doing. granted, they're flat circuit races, so not that challenging, but still fast.

anyway, i finally decided to quit again (this time for good). haven't had a smoke for the last 8 days (i was a 2 1/2 pack a day smoker). once again i tapered down for a week, and now have the occasional nicorette nasty @ss gum.

been riding more the last few weeks to keep the endorphins going, and to try to avoid the weight gain.

i'm already looking forward to the racing season, no more excuses this year ;)

so my advice - don't try and quit. quit.
 

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Shirtcocker
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Cory said:
But I don't understand how anybody who smokes can be unsure of why he'd want to quit. You can read, right? You can see smokers around you stinking and wheezing and coughing up blood? And you're "not sure" why might stop doing that?
cory...it's an addiction. You wouldn't understand.
 

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You gotta really want to to do it

I'm embarrassed to say that I'm an ex-smoker. All I can tell you is that you've really got to want to give up because it will be hard. The addiction is as much an emotional/mental one as it is physical. I recommend forgetting about all the 'aids' and bite the bullet for a week. You will feel like hell from time to time but it will become easier.
You're wasting your time if you’re not serious about it though. Think about it, be serious about it, set a deadline, and be strong. It could well be one of the most important decisions of your life…and I’m not over-dramatising the issue.
 

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Shirtcocker
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snapdragen said:
I quit about 13 years ago, using the patch. I have friends that smoke, and I do nag every so often. But the truth is, if you do not want to quit, you will not be successful.
10 year former smoker here--haven't smoked (save for a few drunken indescretions) for over 10 years now. The only thing that worked for me was cold turkey for about a year. I now have little to no cravings anymore, but the key is keeping totally clean for about a year. Smoke one cig a few months after quitting and you'll be down to the nearest 7/11 for a new pack the next day.
 

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Misfit Toy
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I quit about 13 years ago, using the patch. I have friends that smoke, and I do nag every so often. But the truth is, if you do not want to quit, you will not be successful.
 

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MN Dan said:
Hi, I am a commuter that usually posts over on C&T. I used to ride bikes a lot when I was younger up to age 22. Now 34 and been riding to work 16 miles RT since 8/05. And I am a cigarette smoker, a little less than a pack a day for 10 years. I don't smoke when I ride. Lost weight through riding and now considering quitting smoking, but not real sure why. Made an appointment for this Friday with the doctor to get a full physical and share my"secret habit", since I have never told him. I have never tried to quit before.

I ride alone on a fixed gear in the winter and tend to push pretty hard to and from work. I don't find it tough to ride in the winter, but all my family and co-workers think it's a big deal. My thought is if I can ride in this junk maybe I could quit smoking. I find that on the bike and about an hour after I don't feel the need. But, in the car driving thats another story ;)
I am a huge fan of the ULTRA sour candy and gum. My plan is to buy every kind walmart sells and try to substitute the candy for the smokes. Part of the problem is I can't find any good motivation to quit. I feel healthy and I don't get any heat from anyone about it.
Any ex-smokers have any advice? Any helpful success stories? Any roadblocks?

Thanks
MN Dan
Feel free to PM me if you don't want to post.
Dan,

I have no direct experience with Cigarettes, but I have my "jones" that I have a hard time whipping and struggle with.

Fortunately for your "jones" there's lots of free help here in our Great White North. I would start with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota's free program (don't have to be a member). Call them up and begin exactly as you have here, that you think you should quit but don't feel a compelling reason (no heart attack, no health problems, no poisoning of sleeping children in the next room, etc) and see if they have a program aimed at you. BCBSM got millions in the settlement to service people exactly like you and can't spend it any other way, so I'd see what they have to offer. I wouldn't be suprised if they have a program aimed at your "place" in the quit smoking paradigm.

Scot
 

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MN Dan said:
Hi, I am a commuter that usually posts over on C&T. I used to ride bikes a lot when I was younger up to age 22. Now 34 and been riding to work 16 miles RT since 8/05. And I am a cigarette smoker, a little less than a pack a day for 10 years. I don't smoke when I ride. Lost weight through riding and now considering quitting smoking, but not real sure why. Made an appointment for this Friday with the doctor to get a full physical and share my"secret habit", since I have never told him. I have never tried to quit before.

I ride alone on a fixed gear in the winter and tend to push pretty hard to and from work. I don't find it tough to ride in the winter, but all my family and co-workers think it's a big deal. My thought is if I can ride in this junk maybe I could quit smoking. I find that on the bike and about an hour after I don't feel the need. But, in the car driving thats another story ;)
I am a huge fan of the ULTRA sour candy and gum. My plan is to buy every kind walmart sells and try to substitute the candy for the smokes. Part of the problem is I can't find any good motivation to quit. I feel healthy and I don't get any heat from anyone about it.
Any ex-smokers have any advice? Any helpful success stories? Any roadblocks?

Thanks
MN Dan
Feel free to PM me if you don't want to post.
Hi Dan
I doubt if I've smoked more than ten packs in my life - tried them as a teenager, decided I couldn't stand the things and soon after, I got into cycle racing, which doesn't sit well with smoking.

BUT I did finally get my wife of 18 years to quit. On the third attempt...

Why quit?

Any other animals on the planet inhale the smoke coming off burning piles of weeds? And we're supposed to be the dominant species on the Third Rock?

To be blunt, just like my wife was for years before and after we met, you're addicted. She is very intelligent, has risen to the top of her game, has more willpower and determination than about anyone I've met, and knew that smoking wasn't good for her - but it still took me a lot of gentle negotiation and three attempts to finally get her off the things for good.

Do you still really want to give money to Big Tobacco, poison your body, and possibly kill yourself? If there's any "yes" in there, you don't want to quit all that hard. And yes, I know it's a hard decision, having seen my wife wrestle with getting tobacco to let go the hold it had over here.

If you wish to remove the above from your life, it's not going to be easy. A supportive family member or real close friend is going to be invaluable. It's better if you have a period of as little outside stress as possible to work on it - one of my wife's attempts was ended by losing her Mom, which would do it to most people, but a job change or house move could be as bad for your quitting efforts.

In the end, her third attempt was aided by prescription 'patches' and an almost vicious attack of determination - even by her standards.

Funnily enough, and I'll personally come around to your house at night and write nasty things on your best bike frame in indelible marker if you mention this where she might read it - she found that nicotine withdrawal patches applied to the conventional upper arm location gave her bad headaches. A girlfriend of hers told her to stick them on her butt instead - and it worked!

One of the first benefits was that once she'd quit, she started to realise what she'd smelled like - basically an old, stale ashtray. But that might be more a girly thing... One thing that helped her, even what is now five years back, is that office smokers were fast becoming social pariahs at work. The 'smoking lounge' is now somewhere out back - many offices in DC won't stand for smokers hanging around the front door or loading bays.

Mostly, good luck to you. Having seen this, albeit at second (if close) hand, you could be in for a raggy time and, in the end, if you want to quit, you will - but only you can actually put a lit cigarette into your mouth once you decide you've had enough.

Regards

Dereck
 

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Resident Dutchbag
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Recent study suggests that spur of the moment attempts are in the long run more succesful than planned ones. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4650536.stm You know the moments when you hate smoking, when you are sick etc. If you want to quit, those are the best moments to do so, but you must really *want* to stop. Good luck. :) I smoked half my life and kicked the habit two years ago without any aid, it was hard for a few days, but not as hard as I had imagined.
 

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If you want to make sure that you never start again, quit "cold turkey". The DT's and pain involved will insure that you will be afraid of ever having to go through that again. In the two weeks it took to get over it, I must have killed 7 people.(or at least planned to kill 7 people)
 

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I found when I quit I found a food I just absolutely hated (in my case it was atomic fireballs) and bought a bunch. Everytime I wanted to smoke, I popped one. I quit real quick. Also include an intensive workout that will make you feel the effects of smoking. Also stay away from scenes that have a lot of smoking.

Good luck
 

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imbasilical moreon
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yes, spur of the moment works!

rogger said:
Recent study suggests that spur of the moment attempts are in the long run more succesful than planned ones. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4650536.stm You know the moments when you hate smoking, when you are sick etc. If you want to quit, those are the best moments to do so, but you must really *want* to stop. Good luck. :) I smoked half my life and kicked the habit two years ago without any aid, it was hard for a few days, but not as hard as I had imagined.
That's how it went for me !!!

Woke up one am with a really sore throat and said "fack this sh!t"...... and to commit myself I threw all my smokes overboard (I was 700 nm out in the N Atlantic)..........

I had only been smoking for 4 yrs ( smoking & keggers @ college), not long like some others. At first there was soem 'jonesin", but after a week it faded out. Thing is all along I knew it wasn't any good for me and I did not want to end uplike this:
 

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Moderatus Puisne
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Just quit.

You know what the reasons are, you just don't want to face the music.

Suck it up -- or, rather, don't.

If you're posting here that means you want to be told why to quit, not why it's okay to continue.
 

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Game on, b*tches!
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Amen, sister. If you're "thinking about it", do you really want to quit? You have to want to quit. I can't share with you how I did it, since I've never smoked. I do have a brother who smoked for at least 20 yrs and quit using one of those herbal programs. My dad quit cold turkey. Bottom line; they were both ready to stop. If you're not fully determined to quit; don't even try (although, for the life of me, I can't understand why you wouldn't, but I'm not you).
 

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Motivation?

If you're ever in Northern Virginia and would like to visit my dad's grave with me, just let me know. He wasn't a young man when he passed away, but the end was too early and too harsh. You could meet the beautiful grandchild he didn't want to say goodbye to and you could meet the beautiful grandkids he never knew. Family and friends who miss him. That sort of thing.

I think it can be pretty darn tough to quit and I don't know what counts as motivation for you. The upsides of smoking seem to me to be few and slight, but then, I'm not a smoker. The downsides are various, and include the expense, degrees of cardiovascular and pulmonary impairment (variable across patients and smoking habits, but all guaranteed to some extent), and the risk--probabalistic and longer-term--of serious illness or death.
 

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Former smoker here. 20 years. Folks talk about cold turkey, nicotine patches, drinking lots of water, learning relaxation techinques, ways to change habitual cues - and all of that stuff is important, and changes the experience of stopping smoking dramatically.

But that's not really the issue. Smoking is only a symptom.

The problem is one of understanding. People smoke because they 'crave' it. They crave it because they believe (or percieve, if you prefer that construction) that smoking 'helps' in some way, that it makes life calmer, happier, more comfortable, less stressful, or some such thing. That perception is an error, and that error is this thing that gets called addiction. But it's only a belief, and it absolutely can be changed.

There is not one instant of life that is made better in any way by having it spent with a lungful of poison. Non-smokers understand that intrinsically, and so don't crave, and thus don't smoke. Smokers hear that and go "but, but...", because they believe that smoking does 'help', however the individual understands that. So they crave, so they struggle, so they smoke. It's the only difference between the two groups.

When you get rid of the "but, but's", you'll get rid of the butts. You can change the habits, and the beliefs eventually follow. Do both at the same time, and life is much easier.

Meanwhile, go hang out over at www.quitnet.com. Great support, lots of learning and advice to be had.
 

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Spicy Dumpling
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EOC_Offalot said:
I found when I quit I found a food I just absolutely hated (in my case it was atomic fireballs) and bought a bunch. Everytime I wanted to smoke, I popped one. I quit real quick. Also include an intensive workout that will make you feel the effects of smoking. Also stay away from scenes that have a lot of smoking.

Good luck
Weird coincidence, when my wife and I quiteight years ago (2+ packs a day). We had fireballs as something to put in our mouth instead of a cigarette. We loved them though. The best bet, WANT to quit and do it. We used patches for the first two weeks and nothing after that. It was a spur of the moment stop to smoking that we had talked about for months. We went out on July 4th and thought that would be an easy anniversary to remember, quit the next day. Be prepared for tough times, I dreamed about cigarettes for two years or more, and occasionally dream about it 8 years later.

DO IT, you won't regret it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
WTF? I'll tell you WTF.

Cory said:
Full disclosure: I've never smoked, never been tempted, never understood why people do it. My mom was a smoker (died of cancer, by the way, after a long decline that nearly destroyed my father and the rest of the family), and even when I was 5 or 6 years old I thought it was a stupid thing to do.
Having said that, though: If you're just "thinking" about it, forget it. You're not serious about quitting, and you won't stick with it, so save yourself grief and guilt and just let it go.
But I don't understand how anybody who smokes can be unsure of why he'd want to quit. You can read, right? You can see smokers around you stinking and wheezing and coughing up blood? And you're "not sure" why might stop doing that?
Because I enjoy it. I am addicted, no problem, I have a few addictions. I am not wheezing or coughing. Getting sick? I haven't called in sick to work since 4/10/01. I am 5' 8" and weigh 161 pounds. My resting pulse is 71 BPM and at my last checkup my blood pressure was 92 over 72. I am not a racer or a vegan and have no desire to be. I limit my self to french fries once every 7 days and haven't had a single hamburger since watching the movie Super Size Me in 10/05. I drink two cups of coffee per day, snack on fruit all day long, and no desserts. No drugs ever.So, I enjoy my vice because I sacrifice in other areas and I don't feel the effects. Am I unhealthy? I don't think so.
Am I scared of dying, not really. Anyone could die at any time, right? We all take risks being on the bike, but that doesn't stop us. Geez, the ride home last night in snow and slush was NUTS!

I understand that you don't get it and that's fine. My point in posting was to try and find out what other Smokers, that are riders, have done. And what motivated them. I realize my smoking is a problem. But how, I am not sure. Saving a whole ninety dollars a month doesn't do much for me. My credit cards were paid off in 03 and my wife and I are putting about 70% extra on the mortgage principal each month.

To everyone else, thanks for the stories and the helpful hints. The picture is a nice touch, that might be what I need to focus on for motivation unless I find something else. I am kinda hoping the doctor will be able to show me something. Keep on posting.
I appreciate the help and information.
MN Dan
 

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Resident Dutchbag
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Another fine pictorial.

MN Dan said:
...The picture is a nice touch, that might be what I need to focus on for motivation unless I find something else....
MN Dan
A tad gruesome, but there you go. ;)

 
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