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A guy from Norway
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After our car broke down, we decided to give car free living a chance. For me, not even owning a drivers licence, that wouldn't mean much of a change. But for my G.F. who's used to take the car just for picking up groceries from 200m down the street that would mean a big change.

Earlier we haven't exactly shared the same passion for bicycling, and I'm not saying we do now, but it's getting closer. She has , not ridden a bike for fifteen years, now agreed to purchase a bicycle that I have gladly agreed to build.

The build will be a small trekking bike with fenders and rear rack. It'll be a 33 single front and a 11-34 cass. That will give her a speed interval of 5.9 mph - 18.2mph @ 75 rpm.

G.F. Bike Build Part I​
 

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The build will be a small trekking bike with fenders and rear rack. It'll be a 33 single front and a 11-34 cass. That will give her a speed interval of 5.9 mph - 18.2mph @ 75 rpm.


very good choice to go with a hybrid / commuter style bike
 

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This is usually a good thing, but you need to discuss a few things right now. Are you expected to ride with her a lot? All the time? Every Saturday? Does she expect to tag along on your training rides? Your group rides? Your solo rides where you finally get time to yourself? Is she going to call you to come pick her up whenever she gets a flat?

I don't mean to sound negative, but consider the reality. I'm sure you imagine both of you riding together through Tuscany or somewhere, but this may require sacrifice from you. This can end up being a very frustrating experience for you unless you both come up with ground rules.
 

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Soul Mining
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Car free living is quite easy in big cities and metropolitan areas. I also found it easier in Europe, with all the transportation links usually within walking distance. I have no idea what it's like in Norway, but I assume it shouldn't be difficult.

I didn't own a car when I lived in England, and even though I would have liked the chance to bomb out the countryside and do whatever I desired, it was quite easy to live without a vehicle. The grocery store was a ten minute walk away; work was within walking distance; major bus routes were a few feet from my door; taxis, though not cheap, were numerous; the railway system (as well as buses/coaches) took me nearly anywhere I wanted to go.

There are downsides, of course. It's difficult to travel beyond the places where public transport will take you. So trips to places out of town can be limited.
 
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