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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

I'm thinking about getting a Habenaro frame. I was wondering if anyone had any experices. I searched the forum, and in general, had good results. Just wondering if that was still the case? Has anyone had recent experience with them? What sort of lead time do they have going?
 

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I'm glad you posted this thread. I have been looking at them too. The frames seem pretty nice and the welds look clean.

I emailed the company and was told that you could get a 1 1/8 headtube but that it would take a few weeks to deliver.

The only other caveat is that the warranty is only 5 years.

If I am going to go ti, which I think I am, there is simply less to be done with the material (as opposed to carbon fiber), thus, a low end frame should be similar to a high end frame.
 

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I went and bit the bullet. Now that I have over a hundred miles on it, I can give some impressions.

For background, this is to replace my 2002 Lemond Maillot Jaune. The frame cracked near the rear derailleur-side dropout, with cracks in the rear rim as well. I was depressed about it for a few days, all the while my wife saying "upgrade opportunity." After the mourning period, I finally listened to her.

I had been considering Habanero for while, after discovering it while googling for peppers. The reviews looked good. So, I exchanged a few e-mails with the owner of the company. Mark is extremely nice, and went out of his way to be more than fair with every aspect of the transaction (even when, in my opinion, he didn't have to). They have many of the companies I deal with beat on customer service (bicycle or otherwise).

So, I ordered a road frame with Ultegra components (10 speed).

A week ago today, the box arrived. It took me the better part of two hours to get the thing ready to ride (wheels in position, handlebars and seat post bolted in, computer attached, etc.). This is mostly due to my own disorganization, a 18-month-old daughter, and a 22-month-old cat (they have a serious sibling rivalry thing happening). Oh, there is my own excitement. I managed to pull a valve stem out of a tube trying to inflate the thing. Oops.

It rides like a dream. I have never had a bike that was so stiff yet comfortable. I can climb better than I ever did on the Lemond (even before the chainstay started to go). It is very smooth and responsive.

I expected it to be heavier or break even than my Lemond. Though the frame was lighter, the Lemond had Dura-Ace (older) components and Race X Lite wheels (the Habby has 32 spoke Mavic Open Pros). However (and I have not put it on a scale), it feels lighter (many who have picked it up agree).

I admit to being a bit of a retro-grouch. This bike has many features (conventional design, pump peg, etc.) that appease that need, while keeping modern touches I appreciate.

All in all, a great bike, and a great deal. I'll post after I have a few hundred more miles (and hopefully a century) on it, to see if this is just new bike excitement, or a great rig.
 

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Waiting for your update.

Thinking about Ti and can't justify a Moots or Merlin (or others). What's the scoop after a lot of long rides?
 

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Habanero frames are great values!

I bought a Habanero frame. Ordering it was easy...stock 54cm frame that arrived in 3 days from ordering. It arrived safely and I was pleased with the welds and brushed finish. The prep on the bike was nice or they just do very clean threading. Bottom bracket spun in easily, as did the shifter boss bolts and bb guide, and the Shimano Ultegra threaded headset went in with ease (used my Park hs press...one of my favorite Park tools).

I built the Hab up with the same stuff I have used on all the bikes I have
built the past few years: Shimano Ultegra 9 speed STI, 3T threaded stem,
Thomson seatpost, Mavic Open Pro wheels, BG saddle, etc. I used a Nashbar
bargain carbon fiber Easton EC30 fork.

The Habanero did ride and fit nice and I am pleased with it. I like the feel of the carbon fork as the bumps in the route I took (a familiar one for me) didn't seem as rough. Where I felt the most difference from the lugged steel bikes I had been riding was on the climbs, but that may be just the difference in weight between the two bikes.

I am a budget buyer and appreciate that there is still a place where someone can buy a nice new titanium frame with 1" headtube and 27.2 seattube and keep within a limited bike budget. It took me two years to break down and pay retail for this frame!

The Habanero reminds me a lot of the 2000 model Serotta Classique Ti frame I used to own in their look, ride and composition (3Al/2.5V seamless titanium alloy). I have also owned a couple of Litespeeds (Ultimate and Classic) and I think the Habanero is more comfortable than the Ultimate was. I would not hesitate to recommend or buy another Habanero.
 

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i've got lotsa miles on that profile 1"

fork, (i have the "bsc" model) it is truly great, you will love that...

chbarr said:
I went and bit the bullet. Now that I have over a hundred miles on it, I can give some impressions.


All in all, a great bike, and a great deal. I'll post after I have a few hundred more miles (and hopefully a century) on it, to see if this is just new bike excitement, or a great rig.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
SantaCruz said:
Thinking about Ti and can't justify a Moots or Merlin (or others). What's the scoop after a lot of long rides?
Still haven't gotten what I regard as a truly long ride (60+ miles). This is due in part to work, rain, and random other stuff. I can put some updated impressions, as I've gotten several breakfast rides, as well as several good climbs in.

I still think it is a great bike--and I think I've riden it enough that the "new" has worn off of it. I think it takes the best attributes of my steel Lemond (comfortable, responsive) and amplified it. I've set a few personal records on a few courses. My average heart rate dropped for these rides as well. I suppose part of that has to do with not having a broken chainstay...

Climbing works well. I think I have a slight preference for the Lemond geometry, which, in my opinion, is better suited to seated climbing. However, I think that may also be a tweak to the saddle here or there. Even before the crash, however, I think the Habby is stiffer, and has great power transmission for climbs.

I still need more miles to say it is the Best Bike Ever, but I definitely think it delivers way more than you pay for it.

I actually saw my second ever Habanero in person this weekend. We were doing the B&O Trail ride in Brownsburg, Indiana. I was actually on my hybrid, as I was towing my 18-month-old daughter. At the food stop, I saw another, and struck up a conversation with the owner. He said he had his for 10 years, with an upgrade to the components mid-way.

Frame looks pretty much identical to mine--same design, and there was no signs of wear or damage to the frame, save for a few scratches to one of the stickers. The only really difference was the stickers--there were more little peppers all over the frame. I want more peppers on my frame!!! He said he had the same nervousness I had in buying a bike sight unseen, but didn't seem to regret the choice.
 
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