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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,
in the interest of being cheap, I have my eyes on some sixteen hole rims to practice wheelbuilding for the first time on my own. trouble is, thirty two hole hubs seem equally cheaper to find, whereas sixteen hole hubs are super pricey. I was wondering if anyone has experience building wheels skipping every other hole on the hub. And with sixteen spokes, what should the rear wheel look like ideally? I'm not heavy (150 in the off-season), and the rims I'm looking at are Velocity aero so I understand thier failure is not probable...anyone have any hot tips? Thanks in advance. :)
 

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Call me a Fred
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While I am not a rim designer, if I were I would design the 32 holes rim with the knowledge that the stresses have to be spread over the 32 attachment points. For a 16 holes rim, I would have to make the attachment points carry twice the stress of the 32 hole one. That would likely drive up the cost.

I would not feel safe riding a 32 hole rim that used only 16 spokes. I would expect rim failure to have a higher probability of occuring.
 

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MikeBiker said:
I would not feel safe riding a 32 hole rim that used only 16 spokes. I would expect rim failure to have a higher probability of occuring.
He's not talking about a 32 hole rim, he's talking about a 16 hole rim and a 32 hole hub. Should be fine for a front wheel. With that having been said, don't get cute with crazy-light spokes. If you are new to wheel building, get someone to look your wheel over before you ride it with a group.

Even at 150, I wouldn't hand-build a 16 spoke rear.
 

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Don't forget that you will have to put a whole lot more tension in those spokes to keep them from "unloading" every revolution of the wheel. If you don't, you will find the spokes getting loose, every 50 miles. If you get too much tension, you will start breaking spokes. Too little, and you will stress the "J" bend, which will cause the spoke to break.
Good luck.
 

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euro-trash said:
He's not talking about a 32 hole rim, he's talking about a 16 hole rim and a 32 hole hub.
I need to get more caffeine in my system before I answer and work on my reading comprehension.
 

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Better safe than cheap!

Please dont compromise your safety for the sake of saving dollars, hubs designed for 16 holes or 18 or what have you for that matter have different material and thickness to distribute evenly the stress, less spokes requires hubs to have harder material or thicker to compensate for the stress it will handle.
 

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16 spoke wheel is not one to learn on...

ILikeShiny said:
Hi there,
in the interest of being cheap, I have my eyes on some sixteen hole rims to practice wheelbuilding for the first time on my own. trouble is, thirty two hole hubs seem equally cheaper to find, whereas sixteen hole hubs are super pricey. I was wondering if anyone has experience building wheels skipping every other hole on the hub. And with sixteen spokes, what should the rear wheel look like ideally? I'm not heavy (150 in the off-season), and the rims I'm looking at are Velocity aero so I understand thier failure is not probable...anyone have any hot tips? Thanks in advance. :)

Like everyone has pointed out, your idea is sound enough, its just the head aches your getting yourself into. A low spoke count wheel is much harder to build (right) than a high count.

If cost is an issue and you just want to learn, find some MA3's, cheap, durable and some matching 32 hole hub, or go 28 maybe. Lots of room for "less than perfect" building there, very forgiving.

Down in the teens, you gotta build them just right...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the hot tips folks

yeah, I guess what my dad told me is right. do it once, do it right. just asking for a pile of crap you can't use if you try to cut corners. thanks for talking some sense into me! ;)
 

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Just for the record, I have some 36 spoke wheels, nice rims on a circa 1988 Schwinn 564 alum. -- essentially a Klien frame. The other wheel set is 32 spoke. Sometimes I run 36 rear and 32 front. Ohhhhhhhhhh jeez !!! The bike has frame shifts too !!! Still a great ride.

Seven cog cassette, or I'd be swapping wheels with the Trek and the nine cog config.

Anyway . . . 32 and 36 spoke make for some nice wheels. And easier to build, maintain -- which is what you're learning to do.

Only thing worse than cutting corners on wheels for a bike might be skimping on the ground inspection for the aircraft before taking to the skies. Crashes are nasty. Having your bike come apart while you're underway sux big time.
 

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This comes up from time to time and the answer is, NO. The hub flange is not designed to take that much pressure at a single spoke hole. Low spoke count shells are designed with more metal at the outside of the flange. Don't mess around with this, a failure in this scenario will be several spokes at once and will take you down, not like breaking a single spoke, which we've all done at one time or another. Pay the $20, get the right hub and enjoy your wheel.

Before someone flames me for urban myth, here is one of the many examples of skipping holes I come across while neglecting a social life:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Rolf-Vector-Pro...ryZ58099QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 
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