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What's the failure rate of these? A neighbor mentioned he knew 2 or 3 people who had the axles break.
So just curious anyone know the failure rate? About like carbon steerers?
 

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What's the failure rate of these? A neighbor mentioned he knew 2 or 3 people who had the axles break.
So just curious anyone know the failure rate? About like carbon steerers?
They're not axles, they're skewers. Failure rate? Don't know, but I wouldn't use them myself. Bad place to save weight.
 

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they're perfectly safe. use them if you think they will help you.

lots of other things pose a much greater risk to health than ti skewers.
 

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I've heard the quick release wears out on titanium skewers. Almost as catastrophic as the axle breaking. I also think titanium pedal axles are a stupid place to save weight. If a pedal axle breaks you can face plant.

I'm not a fan of carbon steerers mainly because carbon fiber isn't as crash resistant as aluminum or steel. Otherwise they are fine if the steerer is properly supported and the stem isn't over-torqued.
 

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I've heard the quick release wears out on titanium skewers. Almost as catastrophic as the axle breaking. I also think titanium pedal axles are a stupid place to save weight. If a pedal axle breaks you can face plant.

I'm not a fan of carbon steerers mainly because carbon fiber isn't as crash resistant as aluminum or steel. Otherwise they are fine if the steerer is properly supported and the stem isn't over-torqued.
Funny, my last pair of Campy Ti axle pedals had nearly 200,000 miles on them before I retired them to my roller bike. Current pair is pushing 20,000 miles. I weigh 175-180 lbs. Where are the failures you speak of? Ti is a poor material for QR skewers because it is too stretchy and so it's hard to apply enough force.

Regards CF steerer tubes, you don't have to be a fan but a HUGE number of them are in use and have been for a decade or more. Not really much of an issue. Aluminum is the material you should worry about when it comes to steerer tubes.
 

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George crashed earlier in that race and refused to change bikes. The steerer didn't just spontaneously break. I'm not sure what the steerer material was on that bike. I've seen that crash used as evidence of the inferiority of carbon steerer tubes...

Specialized had that recall on their carbon steerers after they started failing. I own a bike affected by the recall. Carbon fiber steerers need to be properly supported on the inside to avoid damaging them them with the stem installed. I really wonder if carbon steerers are any lighter once you add the aluminum sleeve or compression plug weight to the total bike weight.
 

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George crashed earlier in that race and refused to change bikes. The steerer didn't just spontaneously break. I'm not sure what the steerer material was on that bike. I've seen that crash used as evidence of the inferiority of carbon steerer tubes...

Specialized had that recall on their carbon steerers after they started failing. I own a bike affected by the recall. Carbon fiber steerers need to be properly supported on the inside to avoid damaging them them with the stem installed. I really wonder if carbon steerers are any lighter once you add the aluminum sleeve or compression plug weight to the total bike weight.
That was an aluminum steerer. It was black anodized and regardless of any previous crash, and most riders crash at some point during P-R, it snapped just below the stem.

I have two bikes with carbon forks with carbon steerers. Each is installed correctly and neither has a sleeve inside, only the correct threaded plug. Alloy and steel use a star nut, carbon uses an expansion plug. Star nuts are typically steel, plugs are alloy and some have carbon parts. Carbon is still lighter.
 

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I had some cheap ti skewers a # of years ago, and noticed that they would allow the front wheel to wobble during hard cornering. Since then, I've used steel skewers on the front. There are lots of light steel skewers these days, so I'd just stick with them. Brandon at bikehubstore.com has light, cheap, secure steel skewers, which do the job quite well.
 

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I'm not a fan of carbon steerers mainly because carbon fiber isn't as crash resistant as aluminum or steel. Otherwise they are fine if the steerer is properly supported and the stem isn't over-torqued.

I believe most carbon bikes now have carbon steerers. Cannondale has been using these for awhile and I haven't heard of any failures.
 
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