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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I feel like a newbie for asking this but I built up a new set of wheels with DT Swiss R1.1 rims. These rims are incredibly hard to mount a tire on. I am using the same tire Vittoria Rubino tires that I use on other bikes and they have proven fairly easy to mount. Anyway after 2 rides on the new wheels I had a flat which fortunately I found in the garage a day after the ride. After an epic battle lasting over 15 minutes I was able to get the tire off. Reinstalling it was hard but did not involve as much cursing and bruised knuckles. My normal technique for removal is the pry the tire off the rim, hold the bead with my thumb to keep if from sliding back on, and then slide the lever along the rim until enough is unseated. With these new rims from hell, it takes insane force the get the lever to move along the rim. Right now I am a little apprehensive about riding this bike because I don't want to deal with this in the field. Any ideas on improving my technique?
 

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2 levers
 

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Yeah, and use the hook they have with the first one. Start the second one about 4 inches or so away. You know the deal.
 

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Yeah, and use the hook they have with the first one. Start the second one about 4 inches or so away. You know the deal.
The hooks are useless with my Kinlin rims. If I hook one lever under a spoke, I can't get the second lever under the tire bead.

Tires are a very tight fit on these rims. I had mangled levers and sore fingers until I found the right technique.

Here's my howto on removing and installing tight tires. Link.

Use 2 levers to remove the old tire. I keep moving them farther apart until I can lift enough slack to finish by sliding one lever all the way around.

The key to mounting is to lift less than an inch at a time, slide the lever, and repeat. It's fast and easy. You do need levers with the right profile for this to work.

 

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Before you start, go around the tire squeezing the bead into the center of the rim where the diameter is smaller. Once you get part of the bead levered over the rim to where it'll stay, go around the rest of the tire squeezing the bead to the center again.

Even on rims where the center is only a couple mm smaller diameter it makes a big difference.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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What eric posted. I can honestly say that I've never 'slid' a tire lever under a bead. I might have to lift if off in a couple spots but's as bad as it's every been. I would NEVER slide a lever under a lightweight or tubeless tire as that can damage the bead. And having that bead undamaged keeps your head off the pavement.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't want to have to deal with a wheel that was that tight. It's one thing to do this in your shop, with some relaxing music playing in the background. But I would not want to have to deal with that on a cold, wet, dark night/morning during my commute.

I guess Im saying.. I'd find a pair of wheels that are more reasonable to deal with.

I don't even know where my tire levers are. I can put my Conti 4 Seasons on my HED Belguim C2+ by hand with very little effort (as long as I use the trick others suggested and keep the bead in the center groove).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Personally, I wouldn't want to have to deal with a wheel that was that tight. It's one thing to do this in your shop, with some relaxing music playing in the background. But I would not want to have to deal with that on a cold, wet, dark night/morning during my commute.

I guess Im saying.. I'd find a pair of wheels that are more reasonable to deal with.

I don't even know where my tire levers are. I can put my Conti 4 Seasons on my HED Belguim C2+ by hand with very little effort (as long as I use the trick others suggested and keep the bead in the center groove).
I can understand that point of view. However, I am cheap and I just built these up with a Powertap hub. If I find a tire that is a little easier to mount that may be good enough.
 

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I like this technique but have not had a chance to try it. I have a Crank Brothers tool that works well but prefer tires that don't cause an issue in the first place.

Not sure how well this works by the side of the road.

 

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Finishing at the valve stem makes it easier to pop the bead over. Definitely agree with CX about not sliding the lever around the wheel to dismount the tire. I ruined a Conti Ultra Race tire that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Finishing at the valve stem makes it easier to pop the bead over. Definitely agree with CX about not sliding the lever around the wheel to dismount the tire. I ruined a Conti Ultra Race tire that way.
It seems like at some point you have to slide the lever along to bead to get the tire off unless you have a bucketful of levers. Right or wrong, I've been doing that way for 25 years with no problems that I know of. This is only the second time I've had a tire/rim combo that required two levers. I packed two strong levers in my seat-bag but I am not looking forward to me next flat on that bike (not that I ever look forward to flats)
 

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Finishing at the valve stem makes it easier to pop the bead over. Definitely agree with CX about not sliding the lever around the wheel to dismount the tire. I ruined a Conti Ultra Race tire that way.
Yep, this helps.

It seems like at some point you have to slide the lever along to bead to get the tire off unless you have a bucketful of levers. Right or wrong, I've been doing that way for 25 years with no problems that I know of. This is only the second time I've had a tire/rim combo that required two levers. I packed two strong levers in my seat-bag but I am not looking forward to me next flat on that bike (not that I ever look forward to flats)
I've never needed more than 2 levers.
 

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I recently battled a Conti Gatorskin on a Mavic MA 40. I managed to get it with a single plastic lever on the road when I flatted but on redoing it back home, used two levers, start at the stem, and I actually sat on the wheel (upright, perpendicular to ground) as I heard somewhere long ago that will get you some extra slack. I used the method in the video above to remount without any levers.

I don't know squat about tubeless, but if you mess up the sidewall by running the lever along a normal tire to dismount, something is seriously wrong with your technique.
 
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