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· N. Hollywood, CA
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's a good tire pressure for a 150 lb. rider carrying perhaps 20 lb. in rear panniers, or alternatively 40 lb. distributed between front (lowrider) and rear panniers? Assuming a 700c wheel, 36 spokes, 28mm tire and a nice sturdy touring rim. The goal is to cover lots of miles without losing much effort due to squishy tires...
 

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ispoke said:
What's a good tire pressure for a 150 lb. rider carrying perhaps 20 lb. in rear panniers, or alternatively 40 lb. distributed between front (lowrider) and rear panniers? Assuming a 700c wheel, 36 spokes, 28mm tire and a nice sturdy touring rim. The goal is to cover lots of miles without losing much effort due to squishy tires...
You're talking about a total load of around 210 lb. 90-100 psi should be fine, assuming your 28 mm tires are rated for that pressure. If not, then go with the tire's rated max. pressure.
 

· N. Hollywood, CA
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tires, weight, and the dreaded shimmy

Kerry Irons said:
You're talking about a total load of around 210 lb. 90-100 psi should be fine, assuming your 28 mm tires are rated for that pressure. If not, then go with the tire's rated max. pressure.
Thanks for the feedback Kerry - seems reasonable. Actually only 175 to 195 pounds of weight, depending on how much gear (which in turn determines pannier count). The reason I ask is that I've had some front end oscillations on my "credit card" touring bike. Generally above 14 mph, up to 25 mph without getting too bad; but not repeatable (aargh!) from trip to trip.

I just sent the frame back to the manuf to check alignment. Their general opinion is that bikes are very sensitive to tire pressure, weight distribution, and pannier load. I'm beginning to feel foolish for assuming that an average/skinny rider, on average 28mm tires, carrying moderate weight in panniers on average asphalt pavement shouldn't have a problem. I wonder how many other cyclo-tourists have had to tinker with minute shifts in body and pannier weight, position on saddle, weight on hands/handlebars etc. just in order to keep the bike from shimmying? Am I naive for assuming that a touring bike would accomodate a range of reasonable loads without any squirrelly handling?
 

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Shimmy

ispoke said:
I wonder how many other cyclo-tourists have had to tinker with minute shifts in body and pannier weight, position on saddle, weight on hands/handlebars etc. just in order to keep the bike from shimmying? Am I naive for assuming that a touring bike would accomodate a range of reasonable loads without any squirrelly handling?
IME touring bikes are more prone to shimmy due to the net flexibility of the racks and packs combined with the frame. As I understand it, the key is getting the weight in your panniers as low as possible.
 
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