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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am buying my first set of tires and I have a question I now that you guys can awnser for me. My bike has 700x25 size tires on it, the set I want to bye only come in 700x23, will this present a problem. Also can you explan the differents between these two sizes.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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dom3333 said:
I am buying my first set of tires and I have a question I now that you guys can awnser for me. My bike has 700x25 size tires on it, the set I want to bye only come in 700x23, will this present a problem. Also can you explan the differents between these two sizes.
700 (or 700c) is the diameter specification of the tire/wheel. Only 700c will fit.

25 is a width designation. 23 is the "standard" road or racing tire and the most common size. Most of us would probably be better off with a wider 25 or 28, but then would have to admit that we aren't pro racers.

In short, you may have to run a little higher pressure in the 23s if you have problems with pinch flats. The higher pressure will make the ride rougher.

TF
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you this exactly the info I was looking for. One more question please, what is a pinch flat?.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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dom3333 said:
Thank you this exactly the info I was looking for. One more question please, what is a pinch flat?.
A flat that is caused by hitting something (usually a pot hole) rather than by something puncturing the tire. Whatever you hit presses the tire all the way to the rim and pinches the tube between the tire and rim. It usually shows up as two little holes, side-by-side resembling a "snake bite". The way to prevent it (other than to ride better) is to use higher tire pressue or more air volume (larger tire). Some recommend tire size to be the smallest that you can use about 90 psi (~160 lb rider) and not get pinch flats. - TF
 

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Old Skool
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A little wider is generally better

Most of us would probably be better off with a wider 25 or 28, but then would have to admit that we aren't pro racers.
TurboTurtle speaks the truth. I strongly agree that 25s or 28s are far better for most riders in most situations. Slightly wider tires offer increased ride comfort, durability and greater protection for the rest of the wheel. Think of the air chamber of the tire as a shock absorber. Wider tires have a bigger (both wider and taller) air chamber. This is like adding more shock travel to your suspension. This comes at a modest increase in weight and rolling resistance.

Back in the day when “all” serious riders rode tubulars (because good clinchers had yet to be developed), everybody road wider heavier tires for training and saved the narrow light stuff for race day.
 
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