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"Acceptable" is a value judgement here.

Personally, I wouldn't ride that tire. Much higher chance of a puncture or blowout. Then, I have lots of spare tires and wheels around, so it's just a matter of the hassle of swapping it. Easy call for me.
 

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You're ok until you can see the casing threads or until you're too nervous to ride it - whichever comes first.
 

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I've worn tires down to the cords many times. Near the end they're a bit more likely to puncture. But it's not dangerous.

Keep in mind that you wore down just a single two inch section of the tire, not the entire tire as happens with normal wear.

Until the cords start to show in that spot it's safe to ride. That'll happen sooner than it would with an undamaged tire so keep an eye on it.

Consider practising hard stops so you're used to them and don't lock the rear tire so much.
 

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The wear on the tire appears to be more on the shoulder than the top. IMO, depending on how agreesively you corner, it is conceivable that your tire may hit the flat spot at the most innapropriatte moment, especially if the roads happen to be wet at that moment.
If your riding is not as aggressive your tire grip could be significantly less demanding. Use your judgment to best suit your predicament.
 

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"Acceptable" is a value judgement here.

Personally, I wouldn't ride that tire. Much higher chance of a puncture or blowout.
Nope. Maybe a SLIGHTLY higher chance of a puncture but no more chance for a blowout unless the casing threads are damaged. I always ride tires until the casing threads just start to show through the tread. Continental puts wear indicators on some of their tires and those indicators are gone just as the casing threads start to show.

People will say that the likelihood of a puncture increases as a tire wears but I have never seen any data that supports that claim. I don't see it in my experience but then I live in a state with a strong bottle law so I don't get enough flats for it to be statistically significant.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The wear on the tire appears to be more on the shoulder than the top.
I fishtailed to the left, so there is some abrasion on both sides of the center, the angle of the photo may not show it. I don't have a trainer, but I did order another tire for the rear that was on sale, a single Conti GP 4 Seasons 25c just in case.

I've read that the Maxxis Re-Fuse can get up to 3k miles, my typical annual mileage. I'm not an aggressive rider and the local roads are decent, so maybe they'll last through the summer.
 

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I'm not an aggressive rider and the local roads are decent, so maybe they'll last through the summer.
It should. Keep an eye on it and when in doubt, replace it.
 

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Consider practising hard stops so you're used to them and don't lock the rear tire so much.
That's good advice. It's easier said than done, of course, but a really skilled braking technique will totally avoid that kind of skid. The rear wheel will not slide until it's almost completely unweighted as a result of front braking. A fishtailing rear wheel clearly indicates that too much braking is being done with the rear. You can practice really hard panic-type stops with the front brake alone, until you're comfortable with braking so hard the rear wheel almost lifts. That's maximum deceleration. The rear brake provides almost none of the stopping power in a proper panic stop. You brake the rear just enough so that it will start to skid a bit as a result of unweighting when you're at maximum braking level, and that helps you regulate the front brake.
 

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I've read that the Maxxis Re-Fuse can get up to 3k miles, my typical annual mileage. I'm not an aggressive rider and the local roads are decent, so maybe they'll last through the summer.
I got 3,200 miles out of my rear Maxxis ReFuse. I probably could get more than that, but I ditched it when it felt thin at my last flat change. The front should last you at least twice as long.
 
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