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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm just getting into cycling and I recently bought a bike off craigslist. I think I got a pretty good deal on it, but the guy I bought it from did a little bit of racing, so some of the parts are a little too lightweight for me (230 lbs) I'm working on slowly switching out parts, but the first (and cheapest) is going to be the tires. The ones on it are really small/lightweight slicks that I don't think will last long.

I've been riding mostly country roads, about 50 miles a week, but plan on upping it to around 100. Can you recommend a tire that will hold up to my weight and the not-so-well paved country roads?

thanks

P.S. my wheels are 13mm wide and 27mm deep. Don't know if that makes a difference...
 

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p != b
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Really, just look for a fatter tire - 25 should be fine, 28 or bigger may be better, but may not fit in the frame. If you let us know what frame it is (both brand and model) someone here may have experience with the bike and know just what size tires will fit.

Otherwise, head down to the LBS, find a tire that looks good and is affordable that says 700x25 on the side, and buy it.
 

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If you can splurge a little on tires I would highly encourage you to try some Tufo tubular clinchers. They will pretty much eliminate any possibility of pinch flats and can be ridden a little ways completely flat which can't be said of any other clincher on the market. They really do roll well for larger riders as well since they can be inflated to 220 psi which allows you to play around with tire pressures to suit your needs. Most clinchers available are only rated to a maximum of 110-116 psi so they depress alot for heavier riders or for those who are on country roads a lot.

http://www.biketiresdirect.com/productdetail.asp?p=TUCSS

http://www.biketiresdirect.com/productdetail.asp?p=TUCSP

http://www.biketiresdirect.com/productdetail.asp?p=TUC25
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hmm, that sounds pretty cool, but I don't know if I'm looking to spend that much on tires. Maybe some day though. Is there any specification that I should be looking for in a tire, or just get a fatter tire?
 

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waterproof*
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Just +1 get the fattest tires that'll fit in your frame. Maybe 28, if you're lucky 32, but at least 25 should fit fine. Get the super kevlar flat proof whatever gizmo tech kind; they tend to have thicker tread and stiffer sidewalls, so they stand up to abuse better.
 

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I have many friends in the 200+lbs range who ride standard x23 or x25 tires. Just keep them well inflated. You'll find x25 or x28 more comfortable on poorly paved roads.

Email Michelin, Maxxis, Continental or others... they'll tell you 230lbs is fine for pretty much any of their tires.

I'd lean toward buying some longer-wearing tires--like Michelin Krylion Carbons in a 700x25 or Continental Gatorskins in a 700x28.

What tires do you have now?
 

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BigRedIdiot said:
hmm, that sounds pretty cool, but I don't know if I'm looking to spend that much on tires. Maybe some day though. Is there any specification that I should be looking for in a tire, or just get a fatter tire?
The Tufos have a flat prevention belt that seems to work for me. I haven't done as many road miles as I should but they seem to wear well and if you only need to purchase a set every 9-12 months of daily riding it kind of evens out. The more economical tires are around $50 whereas even shopping around on Performance Bike I believe most tires are around $25-40. Not much of difference since you don't buy tubes for the Tufos. The sealant they recommend seems to work well from what I have heard but I haven't used it yet. FYI I have approximately 2000 miles on mine and they are starting to need replacement...mind you I do a lot of my riding on gravel/dirt/grass as a part of my training so they see some additional stress.
 

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Seriously... check out the Krylion Carbons in 700x25. They should last you 3000-5000 miles, and you can get them online for about $25/ea. Do a search on this forum, and you'll see they are one of the most popular strong training tires.

If you're going to get them.. get them soon. Michelin just moved their factory to China and is several months behind on getting stock out of the new factory. They are out of stock at probikekit.com and other popular sources. You can still find them some places, though...
 

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BigRedIdiot said:
After a quick google search, I found this chart: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire_sizing.html. Almost all the way to the bottom, there is a red and green chart that compares rim widths to safe tire widths. Do you think this is accurate?

If it is, I should go with a 25, right?
For a huge margin of safety, it's accurate. On the other hand, some 29er mountain bikers run mavic open pro road rims with 2" tires without much trouble. anywhere from 23-30c should fit on your rims with no trouble. 99.99% sure that 25s will fit on your bike. Not sure about 28s. How to tell? Either buy tires, see if they fit, eat the cost if they don't, or make friends at your lbs and ask them to help - they may have some old tires lying around that they can try out.
 

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I'm 6ft and 230lb riding on 700x25 on 100psi or 95 if I'm not trying to get the most speed out of the bike. My Giant OCR C3 came with Michelin's and they've held up well. I can't recall what exact Michelin it comes with but they have to be one of the basic models from them. I've had one flat period. I'm riding about 100 miles a week too. Can't go wrong with the Michelin Man.
 

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steel515 said:
happy4u, what rims can take 200psi?

Steel515,
Unlike other clinchers the TUFOs have a rubber "gasket" if you will that has beads on either side that seats into the hook bead rim. The tire actually is encased like a tubular tire so it doesn't exert any undue pressure against the rim's sidewalls so allowing you to run extremely high pressures.

Check this link out because it does a much better job of describing how they work.

http://www.tufonorthamerica.com/tiretypes.php

The additional benefit is similar to a tubular tire in that the round tire circumference allows better corning.

Dan
 

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BigRedIdiot,
As some have mentioned on here it is possible to run lower pressures (95-100 psi) but on smooth well paved and clean roads. If you ever encounter glass, railroad tracks, rocks, potholes etc on your route then you run the risk of pinch flats. I would always opt for the higher pressures and once again I have great success with Tufos because of the lack of pinch flats. Nothing is more frustrating than getting 3 flats in a 20 mile ride and this was the case with some brands. I have always been surprised by the lack of popularity of the Tufos since they really do deliver on their promises. Here's a link for you in case you may have mistaken them for regular clinchers:

http://www.tufonorthamerica.com/tiretypes.php

At your weight I would recommend maybe 140 psi in the rear and 110-120 in the front. Don't let the pressures scare you off since they seem to be relatively supple compared to most of the clincher + tube combos.

Additionally, what kind of rim are you riding? Campy plus Mavic rims have always been a real painful handful when combined with Michelin tires (Pro2Races, Krylion, and Ironman). This is from someone who has been riding for nearly 23 years and changed a lot of flats along the way.

If you do go the traditional clincher + tube combo use talcum powder in the tires (coat the inner surface of the tires with baby powder) before installation and coat the tube with it as well (apply a healthy dose in your palm and slide the tube through the hand with powder). It really allows you to slip the tires over the rim shoulder a little more easily. And when you order new tires order a couple of extra tubes. It's always smart to carry a new tube. If you already know all this please feel free to disregard.

Dan
 

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Bigredidiot,
I found another site that seems to offer better pricing. I've ordered from this site before and let me just say that they have been fantastic at getting your order out asap. I normally order just track equipment from them so I didn't bother to check if they carried clinchers until now.

http://www.worldclasscycles.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?

They have some Tufos starting at $29.50 on up. So it might be worth a try for you. I use the Tufo S-Lite 215 tubular clinchers ($56) and they are really nice performance tires with great puncture resistance.

Hope this helps,
Dan
 

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Hppy4u do you work for Tufo or a store trying to sell Tufo? If you do come out and say so, becuase you sound like an idiot babbling on about their product. Everyone has their favorite product but when 1/3 of the threads posts are about how great Tufo tires thats a little excessive.
Tufo clincher/tubulars are a neat engineering trick but most people will agree that they have no real advantages. All the flat protection belts and sealant in the world won't give you any advantage if you have a massive cut, that destroys the tire and such things do happen. What are you going to do then, you can't boot the tire, so you have to carry another standard clincher tire, tube and pump to get you home. Tufos also are regarded by most to have the suppleness of a garden hose combined with above average rolling resistance and rubber that has a slippery feeling. Maybe if Tufo made a tire that was in the same leauge as Continental or Michelin things would be different.
About the OP's question. A high volume tire, 700x25 or 28 would be right up your alley for the reasons others have stated above. Some favorites of mine are the Conit GP 4 season and the Panaracer Extreme Duro.
 

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As a fellow clyde, I recommend Continental Gatorskin Ultra (foldable). They roll well, offer good flat resistance, and are very durable. You can run a 25mm in the rear and a 23mm in the front. Most of your weight is on rear wheel and your fork might not take a 25mm. The handling is not affected by using different size tires.
 
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