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If I build a titanium frame (with alloy bb, stem, pedals, seatpost), and use anti seize, how often should I pay attention to parts to prevent seizing? If I leave it assembled for 1 year, will it seize?
 

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Assuming a threadless headset with a carbon fork, the only thing you'll really need to worry about are the seatpost and bottom bracket. You're probably going to use a carbon seatpost, so that'll not be a problem with seizure. So, you're basically just looking at your bottom bracket cups. I'd probably remove it once every 6-9 months. If you have pedals with titanium spindles, then probably the same schedule there. I use an automotive grade anti-seize compound in my shop - it's a lot cheaper and available in bulk then the commercial 'Ti Prep' that Finishline makes. I've personally eschewed titanium frames because I don't like having to deal with all the complications that you're considering. Of course, that's only my opinion - at least you're aware of the problem. I've had to free a seized (titanium) seatpost from a (titanium) frame. Ultimately got it out, but no anti-seize or grease had been used. That was a long day at work
 

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gmcastil said:
Assuming a threadless headset with a carbon fork, the only thing you'll really need to worry about are the seatpost and bottom bracket.
I too have been paranoid about this, but I hadn't thought about the headset cups. Are you just saying to let it happen? Or are you just saying that I only have to hit the headset removal tool a little harder with a hammer? I have a Chris King headset, so it is not like I am going to change it.

I also have a Seven, which has a composite sleeve for the seatpost. No issues there. Also cuts down on creaking, so one of the (many) nicer aspects of my Seven.
 

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try tacx dynamic

try tacx dynamic paste. It's made to stop corrosion and it increases friction between parts so you can reduce the amount of torque you use when tightening parts. It came w/ my syntace stem for the bolts- I use it for all my ti bolts, my carbon seatpost (frame is scandium) to prevent slipping and wherever else there's a ti/alu/carbon interface.
It really is the greatest stuff ever!
 

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I use teflon plumbers tape and regular anti-seize on the BB in my Ti frame. I left it in there for the last two years, including more than a few rain rides. When I took it out last week to put it in a new frame, everything was just fine. The teflon tape keeps the BB from making noises.
 

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Complications?

gmcastil said:
I've personally eschewed titanium frames because I don't like having to deal with all the complications that you're considering. Of course, that's only my opinion - at least you're aware of the problem. I've had to free a seized (titanium) seatpost from a (titanium) frame. Ultimately got it out, but no anti-seize or grease had been used.
Complications? I learned very early on that any quality build involved coating every metal to metal interface with grease. Seat post, headset cups, BB cups, etc. And this was with steel frames and steel BB cups and head sets. Al seat posts get stuck in steel frames all the time if they're not greased. There is zero complication relative to Ti frames - you just use the same good practices that have been in place for many, many decades (perhaps more than a century?).

During my annual overhaul, I grease all metal-metal surfaces and never have problems with things getting stuck, whether it is steel-Ti, steel-Al, Al-Ti, CF-Ti, or Ti-Ti. Anti-seize or Ti-prep work fine too, but are not required. Grease does the job.
 
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