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My father is riding a road bike that has not been fit to him. It is close to the right size though.

He says his hands have been going to sleep when he rides. Does raising the seat or lowering the seat take weight off the wrists?

Or raising or lowering the bars?

I was thinking raise the seta but I read on the google webz to lower the seat.

Thanks
 

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Hucken The Fard Up !
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flat saddle, a bit lower
 

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Adventure Seeker
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Moving your hands more helps considerably. You can raise the bars to take more weight off, but my first suggestion is best.
Adjusting the saddle too high or low can cause knee pain, so be careful when doing that.
 

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Many factors

151 said:
My father is riding a road bike that has not been fit to him. It is close to the right size though. He says his hands have been going to sleep when he rides. Does raising the seat or lowering the seat take weight off the wrists? Or raising or lowering the bars? I was thinking raise the seta but I read on the google webz to lower the seat.
Typically lowering the seat means more weight on your butt and less on your hands, but that is NOT the right approach to dealing with numb hands. The bar height should be changed, not the seat height. Beyond that, simply changing hand position more often may be all that is needed. Core strength improvements can also allow the body to "carry the weight" so you don't put so much weight on the hands. Many people have good experience with padded cycling gloves. Likewise, extra padded handlebar tape (or double layers) helps some folks.
 

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I think his hands may be going numb due in part to leaning down on them. Try raising the handle bars so that he doesn't need to lean down as much to hold on, that way he can transfer a bit more weight to his behind. You can also purchase a custom stem that angles up more (holds the handle bars up higher) for pretty cheap. Another thing he can do is try to change positions more frequently (bar tops and drops) and let go with one hand every now and then to stretch it and relieve some pressure. Is he using cycling gloves?

Lowering the saddle would also help with this problem, but it could cause others. I would not simply lower the saddle to accomodate this, as the seat height should be based on other things in particular leg length. However, you might want check to see if his saddle is in the correct position horizontally - search google if you're interested, it involves using a plumb line between the knee and pedal axle and is relatively simple to check. If his saddle is too far back, it may be causing him to lean forward more than necessary and should be moved up (Note: if you move the seat forward, you'll need to raise it a little bit to compensate).
 

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Descender
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You start arbitrarily messing around with seat height and you may create a whole nother set of issues - that may or may not solve the numb hands issue.

Get a pro fit done - a good fitter will be able to ID some potential issues fairly quickly.

Could be the seat height, could be the bars, could be his form on the bike, could be he has extenuating circumstances with health - wrist, hand, shoulder problems - could be a lot of things.
 

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I had the same problem on a new bike I just set up and I found that I had the bars rotated back too much. I just rotated the bars forward a little and the numbing stopped. I ride in the hoods most of the time and I think that my wrists were bent too much causing the numbming. Raising and lowering the bar didn't help.
 

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RBR is a nice place so many may reply in trying to help. But the info given in the OP makes the possibility of getting any meaningful advice virtually impossible.

The OP doesn't specify, for example, age of rider, current fitness level, size of frame too large or too small, rides with cleats or with sneakers and toe clip pedals, mileage intended for average ride, intention of either taking up the sport or intention to be a casual rider, does he know how to correctly sit in the saddle, etc etc.

Ask someone who cycles to look over your father's set-up on the bike, the purpose to verify that something is not totally wrong with the current bike fit that unchecked could cause injury. If your father is starting up from not having ridden at all, he will be uncomfortable for a while until he is accustomed to the riding posture and his fitness improves. Until that time, any advice asked for or gotten is addressing symptoms and not establishing a foundation to go forward.

Best of luck.
 

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Nielly said:
I had the same problem on a new bike I just set up and I found that I had the bars rotated back too much. I just rotated the bars forward a little and the numbing stopped. I ride in the hoods most of the time and I think that my wrists were bent too much causing the numbming. Raising and lowering the bar didn't help.

This could very well be the reason. When I ride my friends roubaix pro(56cm) my hands go numb within 5 minutes (w/ bar phat and s-works ergo bars) with and without gloves. When I ride my Felt F5(54cm, round bar w/out bar phat) my hands never go numb. I attribute this to the ergonomics created by his bar positioning. He likes the bars rolled back far more than needed and curls his hoods in. He runs a 60mm stem and I run a 100mm. This puts tremendous stress on your wrists. I think he tries to compensate for inadequate bar height & width and, reach issues by rolling his bar back and hoods in. The front of his roubaix easily sits 3-4" higher than my Felts with approximately the same seat height(1/2" more for him). So I recommend little things such as correct measurements. A good bike fit with a system like Retul will make all the difference in the world. I'm planning one for over the winter for myself.
 

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Nielly said:
I had the same problem on a new bike I just set up and I found that I had the bars rotated back too much. I just rotated the bars forward a little and the numbing stopped. I ride in the hoods most of the time and I think that my wrists were bent too much causing the numbming. Raising and lowering the bar didn't help.

same thing-- after trying all the other suggestions mentioned here (and a few that weren't), this is what worked for me. I only wish I realized it sooner.
 

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Funny.. I was searching this topic (See I do search sometimes)

and thought I would mention.. EVERY SINGLE TIME I ride.. And only on my new RB not my MTB.. I get numb hands..

but.. The funny thing is, it goes away and actually my hands feel great after about 10 minutes.. But that first 10 minutes I'm always moving my hands all over the place..

Honestly I'm not worried about it at all. Just thought I would mention...
 

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Maybe neither. You could try moving the saddle rearward just a centimeter, and see it that helps. Sometimes moving the hips back just slightly balances the upper body weight more over the saddle, and can take weight off the arms/hands. This will mean being a little more stretched out, but after getting used to that, it might be more comfortable on the hands. If it helps a little, but not enough, moving the bars up slightly in addition to moving the saddle rearward might do the trick. Worth a try.

If do move the saddle rearward, and knee pain ensues, reset to original position.
 

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Bar bend. Odds are you're running with an ergo bar as most bikes are offered that way, but if not: classic bends could provoke you to fall more on your hands.

Or if that isn't the case...ironically more reach. A bar too close may make you tense in order to maintain stability. When climbing on too short reach, you'll fall more on the bar more than pull on it comfortably.

Can't comment on bar angle, as you also have to pinpoint hood position simultaneously. I'm personally running relatively long reach and the lowest bar position possible. Hoods and angle were set to what fit my hands securely.
 

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When I use flat bars, like on a mountain or city bike, my hands get numb. I have this problem on some motorcycles too. Riding with normal road bars, they don't. That's just me.
 

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What the what???
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Either lower the saddle or raise the bars. I decided to go with the latter...
 

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Rotate his position backwards a little.

Think about this. Bend over at the waist keeping your legs straight....see how much pressure you are putting as you bens....it increases. Now as you bend forward, put your but out in the opposite direction to counterbalance the weight of your torso. feel the difference, it's strain free.

Same thing on a bike....if you want to take weight off your hands, move your butt back a little. The tough part, is that as you move your seat backwards, you have to lower the seat a little to compensate and put your legs in the right position...once you do that, you need to shorten and raise the reach a little so your contact points end up in the same relative position.............it's all interactive. You want to tweakk this until it feels right.....little changes make a big difference.

IME

Len
 

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I suffer with the same problem, and I have tweeked everything to try and alleviate the numbness in the hands. My next step is adding aerobars. I figure that with the use of these added bars I can rest my hands by placing the weight on my forearms for a spell. I really don't know if this will work or not, but I figure it's worth a try.
 

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A physical therapist told me that if your ring and pinky fingers are numb, it has to do with pressure on your hands from sitting to close to the bars on the saddle.

If the numbness is coming from your middle, index or thumb, then it is attributable to the way that you are seating and stretching your neck.

Not all numbness in your hands can be attributed to saddle position, but rather overall posture on your bike.
 
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