Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well, a lot of you have helped me out in another thread of mine about which bike to get. that part aside, it seems like in my price range a lot of the bikes have the ui2. dont get me wrong. i want it, but its also pricier than not getting it. vs. staying with an ultegra/ 105 mix etc. or sram depending on the manuf.

so whats the verdict? oh . this is also my first full blown road bike. mtb originally etc.

im narrowed down sort of on my bike manuf. decision. basically just wondering if electro is as awesome as the reviews lead you to believe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,597 Posts
I test rode a Giant Defy with electronic Ultegra on a demo day at my local bike shop. It was outrageous. I loved it. Biggest difference is using the big ring. Absolutely effortless, a touch of a button and the buzz of the electronics and wham... you're in the big ring. I can't say enough for the beauty of this system.
On another note, I'm really old school and prefer the regular 105 system that I have on my bicycle. But if you have the money, definitely give it a shot. You will not be disappointed.
 

·
δanned
Joined
·
7,006 Posts
I have Ultegra Di2 on my 2012 Scott Foil 15, and I love it. It never misses and never needs adjusting. I like the fact that you can safely shift the front chainrings while standing on the pedals, too. The battery rarely needs charging as well. I suppose the one glaring downside is the additional cost over a mechanical system, but if you're a savvy shopper you can find a good deal. My Foil would normally sell for $5000, but I got it new on Ebay for $2749, so there was no question as to whether or not it was a good buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
I just finished putting DA 9000 mechanical on my old Parlee Z4 and took the first ride today. Seriously, shifting felt like I was just pushing a button. I've never had a front derailleur work as well.
Since the Ultegra version of 11 speed has just been released, I'd seriously look at that.
I've got enough batteries to deal with now (iphone, Garmin, tail light) and just didn't see any advantage of having electric shifting.
If I ever did go that direction, I'm 100% sure the wires would be routed internally and the battery would be in the seat tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I sell a good number of bikes with Di2 and everyone loves it. In the end it's loved not because it makes you faster (because it of course will not) but because it's enjoyable to use............it's just plain fun.

Good mechanical systems are very, very good and nearly without fault and no one 'needs' more so, IMO, there is no way to justify the purchase of electronic stuff based on performance. But one can justify it based on enjoyment. If you like using it more and can tolerate the price difference than you should go for it and enjoy.

A test ride will seal the deal either way. Have you had a chance to ride electronic yet? If not then test ride one and you'll know in short order if it's worth it for you.

Have fun.


Dave
 

·
fu
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
I sell a good number of bikes with Di2 and everyone loves it. In the end it's loved not because it makes you faster (because it of course will not) but because it's enjoyable to use............it's just plain fun.

Good mechanical systems are very, very good and nearly without fault and no one 'needs' more so, IMO, there is no way to justify the purchase of electronic stuff based on performance. But one can justify it based on enjoyment. If you like using it more and can tolerate the price difference than you should go for it and enjoy.

A test ride will seal the deal either way. Have you had a chance to ride electronic yet? If not then test ride one and you'll know in short order if it's worth it for you.

Have fun.


Dave
So what you're saying is that people who bought Di2 probably ride their bikes more just so they can play with the buttons ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
So what you're saying is that people who bought Di2 probably ride their bikes more just so they can play with the buttons ;)
In a way - yes. What ever makes the bike more enjoyable and more likely to be pulled off the hook and ridden is a good thing. I know if I get a new pair of gloves i ride more just because it feels good.

In the end we aren't doing anything more than having fun 99% of the time. Most of us ride for the enjoyment of it and anything that makes it more enjoyable is a good thing.


dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,666 Posts
It works great, no question. There's not much room for discussion there.

Personally, I'm fine with "good enough" for shifting though and if I had the extra money in my bike budget when buying I'd choose to get better wheels, maybe a backup set of wheels, the next frame model up, a lifetime supply of tires, chains ect, a bunch of nice clothing items, ect or something else if I really needed to drop the coin.

But some people are really into shifting precision and value it more than other things the additional cost of electric would buy you and that's fine too, I'm just not.

I guess it boils down to you should test ride it and not listen to strangers on the internet. We all have different values as far as what we spend our bike money on goes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
It works great, no question. There's not much room for discussion there.

Personally, I'm fine with "good enough" for shifting though and if I had the extra money in my bike budget when buying I'd choose to get better wheels, maybe a backup set of wheels, the next frame model up, a lifetime supply of tires, chains ect, a bunch of nice clothing items, ect or something else if I really needed to drop the coin.

But some people are really into shifting precision and value it more than other things the additional cost of electric would buy you and that's fine too, I'm just not.

I guess it boils down to you should test ride it and not listen to strangers on the internet. We all have different values as far as what we spend our bike money on goes.
Well said - you put into words what I was thinking but didn't have the right words for.


dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,346 Posts
Two guys in my club just bought bikes with Di2. Both were somewhat skeptical. Both are now huge proponents of electronic shifting. Neither has anything negative to say. One of the guys made an interesting observation/comment - he said he's shifting more now. He's finding he's more likely to attempt to stay in/find the optimal gear as opposed to just decreasing/increasing cadence for a short period. He suspects the net has to be increased speed/power, etc.

Personally, I won't demo Di2... until I'm ready to buy... I'm afraid I'll like it ;-)
 

·
Seeking shades of grey
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
I would incline toward electronic. I haven't met anyone yet who would prefer to go back to mechanical. They are both great, but the current electronic offering is very refined.

You can put me in the category of "over my dead body" opinions a few years ago, but I've come around. I used to ride with toe clips and friction shifters. Electronic is to mechanical in the way that indexed shifting changed things. In large part I'm on board with electronic because it is simpler. Yep, you read that right. Look at a diagram of the inner workings of a mechanical shifter sometime. An electric servo motor is remarkably simple in comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,880 Posts
Ultegra 6800 (11-spd) is coming out soon.

The new 6800 mechanical will shift every bit as well as the old Ui2 electronic; reason is because both systems use the same front derailleur mechanism.

The 6800 mechanical will brake better than any previous generation electronic groups.

Of course, the "6800 electronic" (should it come out) will be a bit better than the 6800 mechanical, but the difference between 6800 mechanical and electric will not be as big as the difference between 6700 mechanical and electric.

Shimano front shifting with electronic is best in class. Period. But whenever I hear folks rave about how they can shift while standing. Ugh.. just because it can be done, it doesn't mean it should be done.

But Shimano 11-spd will require a compatible 11-spd hub. So if you already purchased a 10-spd wheelset, then you need to think about it.

Personally, at this point, if I'm putting a new bike together, it will be either Ultegra 6800 mechanical or electric (when it comes out).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Ultrgra/105 mechanical vs Uletgra electronic are not at the same price point so it's not a good comparo.

Compare Ui2 is nearly price comparable to mechanical DA7900 or SRAM red or Campy chorus. So top of the line mech is the better question ... IMO I'd take top of the line mech over the same priced (or nearly similar priced) electronic anyday and did a year ago. Not saying Di2 isn't cool, I find electronic intriguing and was very impressed in demo. But the mechanical is lighter, cleaner looking, and after many years of smooth shifting just isn't worth it for me yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I just built a Parlee Z5 and I opted for SRAM Red because my priorities are ergonomics (I love the tactile feel of SRAM) and weight. Oh, and because it was the cheapest option didn't hurt either. But I might be an outlier, because I prefer a manual transmission on my car, and I use tube amps, play records on my turntable and collect mechanical watches... sniff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
The reason I got Ultegra Di2 in the first place was because of a hand injury.
What I notice is the rear shifting isn't much smoother, but it is easier to just press a button. The front shifting is definitely a big improvement. Since it is easier to shift I shift more often and find I am the right gear more than people I ride with. It is nice that it rarely needs any adjustment and no cables to bother with. I do prefer the shape of Campy levers better and might build some Di2 buttons into some Campy levers. The battery just isn't worth worrying about it lasts several months before needed a charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I just built a Parlee Z5 and I opted for SRAM Red because my priorities are ergonomics (I love the tactile feel of SRAM) and weight. Oh, and because it was the cheapest option didn't hurt either. But I might be an outlier, because I prefer a manual transmission on my car, and I use tube amps, play records on my turntable and collect mechanical watches... sniff.
i figured it might be good for someone like you. i mean it must take forever to ride to a payphone now days..... lmao
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
yeah, i def. want it. im just at odds right now. after a stop at the local specialized boutique or whatever you call it. im sort of leaning towards getting a cheaper bike i.e. a "lower end" roubaix to kind of see what exactly i like and then later on buying/building a top notch bike. the only thing that worries me about spending so much coin up front is the " i wish i would have....."

....but on that same note, since im not racing etc. im more prone to keep the bike for a long time if it was "loaded" when i bought it in the first place.

as i said in another thread. im a weight lifter. 6'3" 230lb. i work out everything legs included. im "strong". (plus spin class)
the guy at the store said usually with guys like me they tend to hold gears a little longer because they can "power" through because of strength ect. and still keep the cadence up? instead of a smaller person having to compensate by shifting more frequently. i guess further making the electro not needed? dont flame me. lol. im just repeating what he told me..... lol
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top