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Bikes, Guns & Metal...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm prety new at this and I probably done some things backwards, I'm doing research AFTER I bough the bikes LOL.

There was a sale in the local shop and it ended yesterday so I went crazy and bought(I put it in layaway actually) a 2010 Specialized Allez Sport Compact for $723 + tax and a 2010 Dolce Sport Triple for my wife for $810 + tax.

We both have no experience at all on bikes and we just started riding about 4-6 months ago, I have been riding BMXs and I recently got a mountain bike for me and another for my wife, she also has a Globe for cruising riding.

My question is, are these road bikes good enough for people like us with no experience?
Did I get a good deal on the price?
Do I really need to get a whole bunch of equipment?
So far we only have inexpensive helmets and a pair of gloves each.

I will upload pics of what I have and i'm hoping you guys can guide us in the right direction.

Thanks in advance for your opinions and suggestions!
 

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Baltic Scum
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Specialized lists your Sport Comp at an msrp of $850. Assuming it fits, you will enjoy riding it for many years or, if you catch the bug, until you throw some serious cash at an "upgrade". Helmet and gloves are a good idea. Enjoy your new ride and do not get dropped (left behind) by your wife!
 

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Bikes, Guns & Metal...
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
seeborough said:
Specialized lists your Sport Comp at an msrp of $850. Assuming it fits, you will enjoy riding it for many years or, if you catch the bug, until you throw some serious cash at an "upgrade". Helmet and gloves are a good idea. Enjoy your new ride and do not get dropped (left behind) by your wife!
I think it fits because I got it at a shop where I rode it and the salesman told me that it's the right size.

My wife can't catch up with me, most of the times that we ride I have to go on the Redline MX20 (BMX), other wise I'll get bored LOL

I'll tell you what, I just started bicycling less than 6 months ago and I already have 2 BMXs, plus one in layaway, one Mtn bike for my wife, one for my daughter and one for me plus my wife have a Specialized Globe Carmel 3 and now I have the road bikes in layaway. By next spring I'll be riding more and more, I'm loving it!

I'm a low income factory worker guy and the fancy shoes and clothing gets my attention but are too expensive, do I really need those things or riding with sweat shorts, regular T-shirt and regular gym shoes will do it?
 

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Cycling shorts and shoes, and clipless pedals, are much more comfortable for riding. The longer your rides are the more important that will become.
 

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Colorado Springs, CO
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629 Posts
Those both look like great bikes. +1 shorts, shoes, clipless pedals. Jersey and gloves too. Cycle clothes make you look like a colorblind superhero, but they are highly functional. You'll find out. A good pair of sunglasses is a must have too. Add to this a seat bag with a C02 inflator, a cartridge or two, a extra tube, multi-tool, and put $20 or $30 in there too.

Once you get your cycling shoes and pedals, get a bike fit. Small adjustments can make the difference between a nice ride and a torture device. Also, you may need to tweak the angle between the shoe clip and the pedal. Look here for more detail: http://www.bikefit.com/products.php I put a couple of these under my cleats to get ride of what i'll call pronation of my foot in the pedal. Before the wedges, it felt like my foot was going to roll off to the outside of pedal. Once again, this is a small adjustment that made a big difference for me.

One thing you'll probably notice right away is the butt-osis you are geeting from the saddle. This is going to take some time to get over and you have to make certain that it's only getting used to the bike and not a fit issue. If it is a fit issue, the tenderness won't go away.

Now that you have a nice ride, ride regularly. Go to www.ridetherockies.com and in the user area there is a good training schedule on the site. it starts slow and ramps up in a manner that should keep you motivated because it doesn't get too hard too fast. It'll keep you on schedule too. If a particular week gets too hard, then just repeat the week before moving onto the next one.

Sign up for a century ride next year. We all remember what an accomplishment it was to do 100 miles on a bike in one day. Besides this, a long ride like this will uncover any small nagging bike fit problems. You'll find out a lot about yourself and your bike on a ride like this.

Oh yeah, one more thing to get: A cycle computer that has speed, miles, and cadence on it. The perfect cadence is supposed to be 91RPM. (Yeah right, took me about 2 years to get to that point - do what is comfortable for you - high 70s or 80s probably good enough for now). Going uphill it's anything above 60 - just as long as you're not mashing (your knees and legs will feel it). Specialized, CatEye, VDO make good ones.

If you want to get the full instrumentation, get a Garmin Edge 705 w/HR+CAD. Comes with software so you can download your performance and look at it in the computer. HR works like a tachometer for your bicycle engine. Cadence will let you know that you are shifting right. I wouldn't recommend the 605 - you can't add anything onto it. Also, if you get a 705 buy the Garmin map software you install on the PC. This way you can plot out routes on the PC and download into the unit. If you buy the chip that has the maps on it, you'll be using the itty-bitty screen on the unit to set up routes. it can be done but it is much easier on the PC.

Hope it helps....
 

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Bikes, Guns & Metal...
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495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ColoradoVeloDude said:
Those both look like great bikes. +1 shorts, shoes, clipless pedals. Jersey and gloves too. Cycle clothes make you look like a colorblind superhero, but they are highly functional. You'll find out. A good pair of sunglasses is a must have too. Add to this a seat bag with a C02 inflator, a cartridge or two, a extra tube, multi-tool, and put $20 or $30 in there too.

Once you get your cycling shoes and pedals, get a bike fit. Small adjustments can make the difference between a nice ride and a torture device. Also, you may need to tweak the angle between the shoe clip and the pedal. Look here for more detail: http://www.bikefit.com/products.php I put a couple of these under my cleats to get ride of what i'll call pronation of my foot in the pedal. Before the wedges, it felt like my foot was going to roll off to the outside of pedal. Once again, this is a small adjustment that made a big difference for me.

One thing you'll probably notice right away is the butt-osis you are geeting from the saddle. This is going to take some time to get over and you have to make certain that it's only getting used to the bike and not a fit issue. If it is a fit issue, the tenderness won't go away.

Now that you have a nice ride, ride regularly. Go to www.ridetherockies.com and in the user area there is a good training schedule on the site. it starts slow and ramps up in a manner that should keep you motivated because it doesn't get too hard too fast. It'll keep you on schedule too. If a particular week gets too hard, then just repeat the week before moving onto the next one.

Sign up for a century ride next year. We all remember what an accomplishment it was to do 100 miles on a bike in one day. Besides this, a long ride like this will uncover any small nagging bike fit problems. You'll find out a lot about yourself and your bike on a ride like this.

Oh yeah, one more thing to get: A cycle computer that has speed, miles, and cadence on it. The perfect cadence is supposed to be 91RPM. (Yeah right, took me about 2 years to get to that point - do what is comfortable for you - high 70s or 80s probably good enough for now). Going uphill it's anything above 60 - just as long as you're not mashing (your knees and legs will feel it). Specialized, CatEye, VDO make good ones.

If you want to get the full instrumentation, get a Garmin Edge 705 w/HR+CAD. Comes with software so you can download your performance and look at it in the computer. HR works like a tachometer for your bicycle engine. Cadence will let you know that you are shifting right. I wouldn't recommend the 605 - you can't add anything onto it. Also, if you get a 705 buy the Garmin map software you install on the PC. This way you can plot out routes on the PC and download into the unit. If you buy the chip that has the maps on it, you'll be using the itty-bitty screen on the unit to set up routes. it can be done but it is much easier on the PC.

Hope it helps....

Thanks a lot for the advise, I'll keep everything in mind.
I have to take baby steps, specially money wise, I don't have a lot of it :mad2:
 

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Bikes, Guns & Metal...
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495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ColoradoVeloDude said:
Those both look like great bikes. +1 shorts, shoes, clipless pedals. Jersey and gloves too. Cycle clothes make you look like a colorblind superhero, but they are highly functional. You'll find out. A good pair of sunglasses is a must have too. Add to this a seat bag with a C02 inflator, a cartridge or two, a extra tube, multi-tool, and put $20 or $30 in there too.

Once you get your cycling shoes and pedals, get a bike fit. Small adjustments can make the difference between a nice ride and a torture device. Also, you may need to tweak the angle between the shoe clip and the pedal. Look here for more detail: http://www.bikefit.com/products.php I put a couple of these under my cleats to get ride of what i'll call pronation of my foot in the pedal. Before the wedges, it felt like my foot was going to roll off to the outside of pedal. Once again, this is a small adjustment that made a big difference for me.

One thing you'll probably notice right away is the butt-osis you are geeting from the saddle. This is going to take some time to get over and you have to make certain that it's only getting used to the bike and not a fit issue. If it is a fit issue, the tenderness won't go away.

Now that you have a nice ride, ride regularly. Go to www.ridetherockies.com and in the user area there is a good training schedule on the site. it starts slow and ramps up in a manner that should keep you motivated because it doesn't get too hard too fast. It'll keep you on schedule too. If a particular week gets too hard, then just repeat the week before moving onto the next one.

Sign up for a century ride next year. We all remember what an accomplishment it was to do 100 miles on a bike in one day. Besides this, a long ride like this will uncover any small nagging bike fit problems. You'll find out a lot about yourself and your bike on a ride like this.

Oh yeah, one more thing to get: A cycle computer that has speed, miles, and cadence on it. The perfect cadence is supposed to be 91RPM. (Yeah right, took me about 2 years to get to that point - do what is comfortable for you - high 70s or 80s probably good enough for now). Going uphill it's anything above 60 - just as long as you're not mashing (your knees and legs will feel it). Specialized, CatEye, VDO make good ones.

If you want to get the full instrumentation, get a Garmin Edge 705 w/HR+CAD. Comes with software so you can download your performance and look at it in the computer. HR works like a tachometer for your bicycle engine. Cadence will let you know that you are shifting right. I wouldn't recommend the 605 - you can't add anything onto it. Also, if you get a 705 buy the Garmin map software you install on the PC. This way you can plot out routes on the PC and download into the unit. If you buy the chip that has the maps on it, you'll be using the itty-bitty screen on the unit to set up routes. it can be done but it is much easier on the PC.

Hope it helps....
Is this what you are suggesting? http://www.ridetherockies.com/rider-area/training/

training
Ride The Rockies is a physically challenging event and requires conditioning. We suggest that you structure a training schedule working backwards from June 12:

The last week before the ride should be a "taper" week with less riding than the previous weeks (and no riding the last three days before the tour). This gives your body a break and allows you to start the tour fresh.

The three weeks before that you should be averaging 140 - 200 miles per week to prepare for the event. Include a weekend with two long riding days, one to three weeks before the event, to familiarize yourself with the feeling of going for a long ride, then getting up the next day and doing it again.

From March through mid-May raise your weekly mileage slowly. This will give your thighs, butt, knees, hands, etc. the chance to gradually acclimate to the increasing mileage. You don't want to jump on a bike and start riding 150 miles per week without working up to it.

Another benefit of spending the spring building a mileage base is that you'll learn volumes about riding a bicycle. For example: How much and what foods and fluids do you need to ride for several hours? What clothing should you wear and carry with you? What tools do you need for roadside repairs?


• Training Plan by Ride The Rockies• Training Plans by Optimize Endurance Services• Altitude Training Tips• To Top•

Training Plan by Ride The Rockies
Below is a sample training schedule for the 2010 Ride The Rockies. It begins the last day of February with three rides totaling 40 miles. Here's how to read the table:

The 1st column lists the date of the week starting on Saturday (to avoid splitting each wknd into two different wks).
The 2nd column is the total number of miles for that week.
The 3rd column contains the number of recommended rides for the weekend and the total number of miles for the ride(s).
The last column contains the number of recommended rides for weekdays and the total number of miles for the rides.
WEEK (START ON SAT.)
TOTAL MILES
# WEEKEND RIDES/TOTAL MILES FOR RIDES
#WEEKDAY RIDES/TOTAL MILES FOR RIDES
February 27
40
1/15
2/25
March 6
50
1/20
2/30
March 13
50
1/20
2/30
March 20
60
1/20
3/40
March 27
70
1/20
3/50
April 3
80
1/30
3/50
April 10
80
1/30
3/50
April 17
90
1/35
3/55
April 24
90
1/35
3/55
May 1
100
1/40
3/60
May 8
125
2/65
3/60
May 15
140
2/80
3/60
May 22
160
2/95
3/65
May 29
185
2/140 *
2/45
June 5
90
2/55
2/35 **
* 60 miles Saturday; 80 miles Sunday
** Monday-Wednesday
There are a few things to keep in mind about this schedule.
It's obviously structured for riders working a standard Monday to Friday day job. If that's not you, adapt the schedule as necessary.

This schedule is meant to serve as a rough guideline only. Recommended mileages are approximate. There's no need to try to match rides exactly to this schedule. What is important, is to build a mileage base that is comparable to the one outlined here, which will allow you to ride upwards of 530 mountainous miles in a week in relative comfort.

Climbing is an integral part of all Ride The Rockies routes. If possible, your training should reflect this. Include hilly and mountainous terrain in training rides. This becomes more important as the tour gets closer. If it's not practical for you to include climbing in your daily rides, perhaps you can drive to the hills on weekends.

Intensity: Coaches and trainers make a lot of fuss about training intensity – emphasizing the need for both high and low intensity workouts. True, this is a very important component of training to be an elite competitive cyclist. We can only assume that if you’ve made it to this point of the page, that isn’t you. Sure, it’s good to vary workout intensity but if you don’t feel good, make it an easy ride and if you feel great, go hard.

Some cycling novices who don't partake in any regular exercise may find the first week's schedule of 3 rides totaling 40 miles too challenging. If this is you, consult a physician before starting any program of physical exercise. Once you've been given the green light, we recommend you extend this schedule by four to six weeks. Begin by walking a couple days per week and riding just one or two days per week. After a few weeks, ease your bike time up toward the point where you can begin with this schedule.

This schedule requires a large time commitment, but it will definitely allow you to Ride The Rockies with a smile on your face.

If work, family or other commitments don't allow you to follow your planned training schedule for a few days, don't obsess about it. Being stressed about keeping a schedule can be more detrimental than missing a few days here or there. Don't ever lose sight of the fact that you're doing this for fun.

CBS4 will feature Ride The Rockies training stories throughout the spring. Tune-in to CBS4 at 6:30 p.m. on Monday and at noon on Tuesday for Ride The Rockies Training Tips with Greg Moody.

• Training Plan by Ride The Rockies• Training Plans by Optimize Endurance Services• Altitude Training Tips• To Top•

Professional Training Plans by Optimize Endurance Services
OES Training Plans are designed specifically for Ride The Rockies and offer access to a coach. Built for beginner to experienced riders the plans work with your ability and time to train. OES provides these plans via Training Peaks, an on-line interface for coach and client with download capabilities and nutrition tracking. Plans include periodized training, recovery weeks with benchmark tests, a complete strength training plan and a coupon for a lactate threshold test. Having a structured plan like this assists in preparing the participant for the tour, which will enhance the riders day to day experience. Learn More!



• Training Plan by Ride The Rockies• Training Plans by Optimize Endurance Services• Altitude Training Tips• To Top•

RIDING HIGH: Effective altitude training and preparation for Ride The Rockies
By Edmund R. Burke, Ph.D.

During Ride The Rockies, you will be visiting some of the most beautiful areas of Colorado and the Rocky Mountains, and we hope you enjoy every minute of your stay. But some of the very features which make these high valleys and mountain passes so attractive can cause problems unless you know how to prevent them.

Above 6,000 feet, breathing and lack of oxygen getting to your working muscles are the limiting factors to performance. When you travel to Colorado atmospheric pressure decreases and the air is thinner and so there's less oxygen available. You will also notice that your breathing becomes faster and deeper and at times you may feel short of breath and that your heart rate is elevated. These are normal and helpful responses by your body trying to get more oxygen to the working muscles.

You may also have a headache, a touch of nausea, or feel tired. About 10 to 15% of all cyclists have such symptoms, which will usually go away in 24 to 48 hours. In addition, the crisp dry mountain air is exhilarating, and your body will lose increased fluids from the deeper breathing and from sweating (often you won't even notice this). It is important to maintain your body's water stores, so drink two or more times more water or juices than you do at sea level. Alcohol and caffeine have an extra impact at altitude, so use these products in moderation.

The sun has more burning power at this altitude, and a bad sunburn can spoil your ride: use protective sunscreen. It can also get cold very quickly at altitude. So while riding, in addition to carrying extra fluids and sunscreen, be sure to carry a light jacket, tights, gloves and hat. Hypothermia (low body temperature) can come on rapidly if you are caught out in a rain storm without proper protection at 6,000 feet or higher- even during the summer.

Sleeping problems are the number one complaint people have when they arrive at altitude. The lack of oxygen affects both sleep and arousal patterns, so your sleep tends to be lighter and you wake up a lot during the night. Many cyclists also experience "dry mouth" while sleeping, and it is a good idea to keep a glass or bottle of water by your bed at night.

So how does one prepare for Riding The Rockies? We know that the longer you can train at altitude, the better prepared you will be to ride at altitude. Your respiratory distress will go down, your body will begin to produce more red blood cells to help carry oxygen and changes begin to take place at the cellular level. The whole effect is a more rapid and more efficient movement of oxygen from the lungs to the tissues. The net effect of this acclimatization to high altitude is a gradual improvement in performance.

In an ideal world, cyclists would spend several weekend visits to altitude during the spring and then arrive in Colorado one to two weeks before Ride The Rockies to acclimatize to higher elevation.

That's great if you've just retired following a grueling five year career at Microsoft. If you can arrange any part of this game plan, go hard.

For the rest of us working stiffs, here's the best bet: find some of the hilliest courses in your area and ride them twice per week for several months prior to coming to Colorado. Then, plan to arrive in Colorado a day or two before the tour.

One more point, and perhaps the best piece of advice that can be imparted on this matter: Relax. Hundreds of people every year travel from sea level to Colorado to Ride The Rockies. The vast majority do so with no significant problems. A very small minority of tour cyclists experience minor problems, and even the most severe of these rarely do more than sideline riders for one day.

Here are some additional tips to follow during Ride The Rockies (and any training trips you make to altitude).

Don't loaf around your first days. Light exercise stimulates breathing and circulation and speeds adjustment.
Even if you are having trouble sleeping, try to get plenty of rest.
If you'll be sleeping in a hotel, use a humidifier. Bring one with you or rent one while you are here.
Eat smaller meals at altitude, but more often, since digestion can be more difficult at altitude. Eat plenty of carbohydrates, which are needed for energy and recovery.
Take deeper breaths as often as possible.
Drink as much water as you can, but avoid alcohol for the first two or three days.
Stop for short rest periods if your heart rate exceeds your target range for extended periods of time.
Carry and drink more water during training than your thirst dictates. While riding, drink a little every 5 to 10 minutes.
In the final days before the ride, make sure to consume 60 to 70 percent of your calories in carbohydrates. This will ensure that your muscles are loaded with glycogen when you start Ride The Rockies.
With these training tips in mind here are some additional things to remember during each days ride:
Set out at a pace that does not allow for undue lactic acid accumulation. If your respiratory rate appears faster or the depth of breathing more labored than usual, chances are the pace is too intense. If you ride using heart rate to set your limits, stay within your target heart rate range. You will reach your target rate at lower efforts and speeds at altitude than at lower elevations.
Make sure to take on fluids and food at the rest stops. Do not allow yourself to become dehydrated.
Carry extra clothing. Once the afternoon hours roll around, weather can change quickly. Wind can dramatically reduce temperatures, and hypothermia can set in rapidly.
If you need to walk the steeper sections of passes do so without feeling guilty, even the best riders in the tour will have to stop to catch their breath at the top of the passes.
With a better understanding of your responses to altitude and a well thought out training program, you can have a very enjoyable experience Riding The Rockies.
Edmund R. Burke, P
 

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Rusted Angel said:
Hi, I'm prety new at this and I probably done some things backwards, I'm doing research AFTER I bough the bikes LOL.

There was a sale in the local shop and it ended yesterday so I went crazy and bought(I put it in layaway actually) a 2010 Specialized Allez Sport Compact for $723 + tax and a 2010 Dolce Sport Triple for my wife for $810 + tax.

We both have no experience at all on bikes and we just started riding about 4-6 months ago, I have been riding BMXs and I recently got a mountain bike for me and another for my wife, she also has a Globe for cruising riding.

My question is, are these road bikes good enough for people like us with no experience?
Did I get a good deal on the price?
Do I really need to get a whole bunch of equipment?
So far we only have inexpensive helmets and a pair of gloves each.

I will upload pics of what I have and i'm hoping you guys can guide us in the right direction.

Thanks in advance for your opinions and suggestions!
1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. No. A set of decent bike shorts for each of you is all you need for now if you already have helmets.
4. Waterbottles and cages, flat repair kits are things you should have.
 

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Learn to do your own wrenching, you'll save lots of $$$ and have some fun.
 

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Registered
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Rusted Angel said:
What do you mean by doing my own wrenching?
Bike maintenance, tune-up, and repair. Yes, you might need special tools but most are inexpensive and you more then pay for them with your 1st repair.
 

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What the what???
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12,714 Posts
The Park Tools website is a great resource for step-by-step instructions on basic maintenance. YouTube has a number of good videos as well.
 

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A wheelist
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11,322 Posts
Rusted Angel said:
What tool kit would you suggest?
Do NOT buy a tool kit as there will be stuff in there that you will never use and there will be stuff missing that you need. Check out the Park Tool site for repair info but don't believe you need every tool that they suggest as they ARE in the business of selling tools and that means selling some tools that can be had other places much cheaper (like allen wrenches) or just not needed like chain cleaner and chain checker gizmoz.

Go slowly, read much and don't jump in at the deep end.
 

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A wheelist
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11,322 Posts
A very good tip is to carry flat -tire repair stuff as you WILL get a flat tire sometime and they're never in a convenient place. And don't wait until you get that flat tire to learn how to use the stuff. At the side of the road is not the place.
 

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Bikes, Guns & Metal...
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495 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks to every one!

It took me about 6 months to pay my bike off and I finally got it a few weeks ago and I have been riding a lot, I recently purchased a mini wedgie bag and in it I put a tube, the tools for changing the tube and a couple of CO2s, I also installed an inexpensive head and tail light.

Here's my bike and Hopefully I'll get my wife's this week, it's been in layaway for over 6 months now.

 

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Congrats on the bikes and hope you like the sport. You don't need much, especially at first. Sure, shoes, pedals, and fancy clothes are great and functional...but you don't need them. I rode without clipless for a long time. ride with flat pedals, then if you go longer distance, use clips and straps. Get some chinese ebay knockoff clothing. It's not super top quality but you don't need to pay $90 for a jersey right away.

Some bottle cages and water bottles are important (learn about hydration and nutrition), and a flat repair kit is important too. Other than that, yes, you can ride in a t shirt and athletic shorts. Cycling gear may be better but it won't be a big deal until you start going on some distance rides. If you regularly go over 20 miles, a parid of shorts and a jersey is adviseable. you can pick up a fine wicking jersey from walmart, which will work.

You don't need to go overboard with tons of stuff until you start to ride longer and harder (that's what she said).

congrats, have fun.
 

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Bikes, Guns & Metal...
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
BostonG said:
Congrats on the bikes and hope you like the sport. You don't need much, especially at first. Sure, shoes, pedals, and fancy clothes are great and functional...but you don't need them. I rode without clipless for a long time. ride with flat pedals, then if you go longer distance, use clips and straps. Get some chinese ebay knockoff clothing. It's not super top quality but you don't need to pay $90 for a jersey right away.

Some bottle cages and water bottles are important (learn about hydration and nutrition), and a flat repair kit is important too. Other than that, yes, you can ride in a t shirt and athletic shorts. Cycling gear may be better but it won't be a big deal until you start going on some distance rides. If you regularly go over 20 miles, a parid of shorts and a jersey is adviseable. you can pick up a fine wicking jersey from walmart, which will work.

You don't need to go overboard with tons of stuff until you start to ride longer and harder (that's what she said).

congrats, have fun.
Thanks!
My plan is to ride the whole year just as it is, no extra stuff ( I can't afford it yet).
I ride to work which is less than 10 miles and some times I ride the local trails for about 20 miles.

I already go a flat repair kit and at home I have an air pump, that should do it for this year.

I'm loving it riding the bike, I can't wait for warmer weather.
 

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Lots of good stuff a the Beginners Forum too,check it out.

I always add these sites to maintenance and repair suggestions: www.sheldonbrown.com
and www.bicycletutor.com (videos and printed).

Even though internet resources are great, for a beginner, I think it's a good idea to get an actual book. I see the Zinn books recommended, but go to big book store and leaf through some. I've found that if you just read and pay attention and follow the steps, you can do almost everything on a bike yourself.

Some of the things require specialty tools, but almost all bike maintenance and repair requires only a set of metric wrenches, a couple of screw drivers and a set of metric hex-key wrenches (aka allen wrenches). I prefer an actual T handle set or folding set of hex wrenches, but they sell a triple thing in bike stores that has the three that are used 99.9% of the time.
 
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