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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello all. I have a "which bike" question with a little twist. my goal is to improve climbing power and endurance on my MTB. I'm in pretty good shape and fairly expert on the MTB, but I haven't been on a road bike in about 25 years.

I decided on a budget of $1500. Then I found this BH G6 in Pricepoint's going out of business sale. $1,800 for what I think is a $4,000 bike. I'm a sucker for a good deal, and even bigger sucker for high end gear. However, reviews state that this is a purebred race bike, twitchy at slower speeds and beginners should look elsewhere.

should I jump on the deal and just ride the bike, twitches and all? I wondered if what is 'twitchy' to one of you experts may be imperceptible to me as I'm coming from nothing

BH G6 Pro Ult Carbon Road Bike 2015 | Shimano Ultegra | FSA
 

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As an expert mountain biker, I'd predict that you would have no trouble adjusting to a road bike with quick handling. I don't know anything about that bike, and not having any opportunity to test-ride, it's a bit of a crapshoot whether the bike will fit you well and feel good to you, but if you can get some help and advice in dialing in the fitting (or you can figure it out yourself), it's likely you can make it work. In any event, I wouldn't worry about it being too much or too racy.

With your mtb experience, you're not really a beginner. It will require some adjustment, but you will find that most skills are transferable.

But be careful, you may catch the bug and find that the mtb gets neglected a bit more than you expect. ;-)
 

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People who do shorter as fast as they can rides would probably like a twitchy (which is just another way to say really responsive) handling bike.

People who do long rides and/or ride at a more steady pace probably wouldn't like twitchy handling.

Being in either of those categories as a rider has nothing to do with being a beginner or experienced.

My first road bike was super responsive and I really enjoyed it for a while. But I soon discovered I preferred longer rides/races to criterium style rides so lost appreciation for the super quick handling and wanted something less responsive.
So you can grow out of a certain type of handling just as easy is into it.

In other words I have no idea if you'll like the handling but being a beginner on the road will have no impact on that. The type of riding you end up doing will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
excellent information guys. really appreciate it.

JCavilia - I thought my original post was a bit too wordy so I edited it down but yeah. I'm not ready to MTB less, but definitely ready to add some Road as well. I have a feeling I'm going to really enjoy it.
 

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It's only a good deal if it fits you. Just make sure it's right and don't always listen to the bike shop as I've seen many of them peddle the wrong size to people just because they need to make the sale.
 

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Being your first bike (albeit, road bike) I suggest visiting a few reputable LBS's, discussing your intended uses and riding a bunch of race and endurance bikes.

As long as you hit the roads on the test rides, they will get you first hand experience on how the bikes handle.. and buying from a LBS you'll get sizing/ fit assistance (versus guessing with an online purchase).

No one here is going to be able to tell you which type of bike will be to your liking. Like saddles, helmets, shoes, etc... this is a highly subjective area, affected by (among other things) fitness/ flexibility, riding style.

I say ride, then decide.
 

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I'd buy the better bike. If you're into high-end gear you'll just end up buying something else down the road and feel like the noob bike was a waste of time and money. I'm speaking from experience. Bought a new low end beginner bike and after about a month I started looking for something better.
 

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I also recommend that bike if you think it will fit. I dont think the "handling" is as much of an issue as people might imagine, except for those who really are experts at road bike handling and are very sensitive to it. Most enthusiasts and even amateur racers don't really notice or care about the differences.

For you, my guess is that for most if not all of us, "handling" fits into the realm of over thinking it. The size and fit of the bike is really the only thing you need to worry about, and given some rough parameters, fit can be adjusted. After you get the bike, the comfort - based on saddle type and adjustment, handlebar type and adjustment, and tire size and pressure - are by FAR the things you should be thinking about. Not "handling".

Me for example. I ride three different road bikes and had a fourth a short while ago. Yes, I can feel the difference in handling among the four bikes, but pretty much don't care. The old one was a Cannodale CAAD frame, full on racing. I moved directly from it to a Felt Z, a longer wheel base, less "racy" bike. I immediately noticed that the handling wasn't as "quick", but once I knew that, I automatically adjusted and did not care. In fact, it actually feels better and I go faster downhill, so the seemingly slower handling is not a negative, just different.

One of my current bikes is an older steel racing bike with very racy "criterium" type geometry: short wheel base, very steep seat tube and head tube angles. It is definitely quicker handling, twitchier than the Felt Z. A lot. But again, it in no way affects my enjoyment of the bike. Again, the quicker handling is not a positive or negative, just different. The difference is fun, but I really don't prefer one over the other (as was also the case with the CAAD vs. the Felt Z).

Finally, I have a cross bike frame that I use for commuting. I don't know how it would handle compared to the others because I have wide tires and usually carry 10-15 pounds on it. It feels kind of sluggish, but again I don't care.

Sooo.... being that your'e new to road biking, and don't have a multitude of bikes to compare to, I'd bet $100 you both won't notice anything notable about the handling, and definitely won't care.

Get the best bike you can afford, it's always worth it imho.
 
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