Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a wheelset that recently started rubbing the left seat stay under hard pedaling. I looked at how the wheel sits in the stay, and its really offset. I pulled the wheel and threw it in the truing stand. Not that I know much of what I am doing, but i can true a wheel that is slightly out of wack. I flopped it, and there was about a quarter inch between the two sides. Question is how much dish need to be there to fit the 10 speed cassette? Can I just loosen all the non-drive sides a bit and tighten the drive sides a bit to pull it away from the stay? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,831 Posts
Re-dishing

fezzy said:
I have a wheelset that recently started rubbing the left seat stay under hard pedaling. I looked at how the wheel sits in the stay, and its really offset. I pulled the wheel and threw it in the truing stand. Not that I know much of what I am doing, but i can true a wheel that is slightly out of wack. I flopped it, and there was about a quarter inch between the two sides. Question is how much dish need to be there to fit the 10 speed cassette? Can I just loosen all the non-drive sides a bit and tighten the drive sides a bit to pull it away from the stay? Thanks.
It sounds like not enough dish to me. You have the concept right: loosen the NDS spokes 1/4 turn and tighten the DS spokes 1/4 turn and see what happens. The rim should be centered in the frame. Flipping the wheel in the frame is probably a better check than flipping it in a truing stand, as the truing stand might not be square.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,831 Posts
Spoke length

fezzy said:
Ok, a real dumb question but aren't the shorter spokes supposed to be on the drive side? I think the LBS built my wheel wrong.
You can build a good wheel with equal length spokes on both sides, though many builders do use shorter spokes on the drive side. If using equal length spokes, you have to tighten the DS spokes another 4-5 turns to get the dish right. Until you take a spoke out and meaure it, you don't know the length of a spoke on either side of the wheel. If the wheel was not properly dished when you first got it, then yes, it wasn't built right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
A quick way to check for wheel dish is to remove the wheel from the bike, turn it around, and re-fit it into the dropouts.

If the wheel sits off to the opposite side then there is likely a dish issue.
If the wheel sits off to the same side there is likely some frame damage or something preventing the wheel from sitting square in the dropouts.

:thumbsup:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top