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I was on a shop ride the other week. When we all got back I noticed one guy had rolled a tubular (on the same rims I have). I talked to him and he said he rolled it going into a corner and luckily managed to stay up even though the tire locked up due to being stuck between the caliper and the rim. I looked at his glue job and there was what I would consider a lot of glue on both the tire and the rim. Is it possible he rolled the tire due to having too much glue?
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I was on a shop ride the other week. When we all got back I noticed one guy had rolled a tubular (on the same rims I have). I talked to him and he said he rolled it going into a corner and luckily managed to stay up even though the tire locked up due to being stuck between the caliper and the rim. I looked at his glue job and there was what I would consider a lot of glue on both the tire and the rim. Is it possible he rolled the tire due to having too much glue?
i kind of doubt that too much glue contributed to the tire rolling. i will glue 2,4,5 tires on a rim and not remove any of the old glue. i'm betting there was some other factor contributing to the tire coming off. after over a thousand tires i still have a perfect record...never had one roll the same season i glued it.
 

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i kind of doubt that too much glue contributed to the tire rolling. i will glue 2,4,5 tires on a rim and not remove any of the old glue. i'm betting there was some other factor contributing to the tire coming off. after over a thousand tires i still have a perfect record...never had one roll the same season i glued it.
As I have always ridden/raced with clinchers and I begin to consider tubulars, your final comment is interesting. Is there a time limit you'd recommend using a glue job?
 

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It's real simple, let the air out of the tire and check the bondline between the tire and rim. The bond is related to conditions sooner or later it will dry and become brittle just like the rest of the tire.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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As I have always ridden/raced with clinchers and I begin to consider tubulars, your final comment is interesting. Is there a time limit you'd recommend using a glue job?
yes...see the reply below. i normally pull mine off and reglue ever season, but check it as mike says below and you'll know for sure.
It's real simple, let the air out of the tire and check the bondline between the tire and rim. The bond is related to conditions sooner or later it will dry and become brittle just like the rest of the tire.
 

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it possible he rolled the tire due to having too much glue?
Yes, it is. Folks like cxwrench have never seen it because they do a proper job of gluing. The purpose of tubular glue is to fill up all the little spaces between the tire and the rim and provide stickiness so that side and rotational forces won't let the base tape move relative to the rim. If there is a thick layer of glue then the only thing you have going is the shear resistance of the glue itself. If you put a blob of some tubular glues on a surface and check it after it has thoroughly dried you can easily distort the clue with your finger. Also a thick glue layer could soften due to the heat of braking or just plain heat (I would cite mid-summer temperatures in the South Dakota Badlands as an example from personal experience).

It reflects a bad glue job but it can be done.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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As I have always ridden/raced with clinchers and I begin to consider tubulars, your final comment is interesting. Is there a time limit you'd recommend using a glue job?
It's real simple, let the air out of the tire and check the bondline between the tire and rim. The bond is related to conditions sooner or later it will dry and become brittle just like the rest of the tire.
Yes, it is. Folks like cxwrench have never seen it because they do a proper job of gluing. The purpose of tubular glue is to fill up all the little spaces between the tire and the rim and provide stickiness so that side and rotational forces won't let the base tape move relative to the rim. If there is a thick layer of glue then the only thing you have going is the shear resistance of the glue itself. If you put a blob of some tubular glues on a surface and check it after it has thoroughly dried you can easily distort the clue with your finger. Also a thick glue layer could soften due to the heat of braking or just plain heat (I would cite mid-summer temperatures in the South Dakota Badlands as an example from personal experience).

It reflects a bad glue job but it can be done.
yep, i can definitely see that happening.
 
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