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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
And it seems that the bike shop did a terrible job of building the gears, or at least tuning them. First the front derailleur would not shift to the big ring. No problem there, just tightened the cable and poof, smooth as silk.

The rear derailleur however is a different story. When downshifting the chain does not line up with the teeth on the cassette, the links just ride along the top of the teeth. Then when it finally manages to slip into place, it will sometimes skips a gear, then becomes jumpy between the gear above and the gear below it. When upshifting, it sometimes does not shift, sometimes shifts two up, and sometimes shifts up, then decides to downshift again.

Also, there is a really annoying nosie coming from back there, like something doesn't line up and it is rubbing, but it sounds plasticy... Only two plastic things back there are the rear derailleur pulleys, but I cannot seem to pin point the noise when hand pedaling.

Unfortunately, I am no longer near the bike shop I bought it from, because I am at college. There is a bike shop here that does rear derailleur adjustments for $15.00 (and im guessing labor also). I am joining the bike club, so I may ask one of the more experianced members to help me out.

Any suggestions as to how to fix this? Or should I take it to the bike shop, or ask a club member?

Thanks for any help!
 

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Nick09 said:
And it seems that the bike shop did a terrible job of building the gears, or at least tuning them. First the front derailleur would not shift to the big ring. No problem there, just tightened the cable and poof, smooth as silk.

The rear derailleur however is a different story. When downshifting the chain does not line up with the teeth on the cassette, the links just ride along the top of the teeth. Then when it finally manages to slip into place, it will sometimes skips a gear, then becomes jumpy between the gear above and the gear below it. When upshifting, it sometimes does not shift, sometimes shifts two up, and sometimes shifts up, then decides to downshift again.

Also, there is a really annoying nosie coming from back there, like something doesn't line up and it is rubbing, but it sounds plasticy... Only two plastic things back there are the rear derailleur pulleys, but I cannot seem to pin point the noise when hand pedaling.

Unfortunately, I am no longer near the bike shop I bought it from, because I am at college. There is a bike shop here that does rear derailleur adjustments for $15.00 (and im guessing labor also). I am joining the bike club, so I may ask one of the more experianced members to help me out.

Any suggestions as to how to fix this? Or should I take it to the bike shop, or ask a club member?

Thanks for any help!
What you're describing is IMO the result of work done by an incompetent mechanic (an understatement). You fixed the FD shifting issue, but from what you describe the RD cable may be hanging up somewhere along the path. This sometimes causes the symptoms you describe, but there could be other adjustments needed and I'm guessing because I haven't seen the bike.

If there's a bike shop nearby that'll tune your RD for $15 I think you should go for it. We could walk you through some things and point you to references, but because of the problem you describe I think the LBS is the best (and quickest) bet.

EDIT: A couple of afterthoughts on this. If you test rode the bike when you originally picked it up and it shifted ok, there's a possibility that in transit (home or to college) something went out of adjustment/ bent, etc.

Either way, I still think it's best to visit your (now) LBS.
 

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There are usually 2 plastic adjusters, called barrel adjusters for the rear derailleur. I like to use the one where the cable leaves/enters the derailleur. I don't know in which direction your der. needs adjusting. easier to achieve this if you can hold the bike's rear wheel off the ground. Maybe your girlfriend can help with this? :). Do the adjustment while the rear wheel is off the ground. If you try to do the adjustments by turning the adjuster then riding to see the effect it'll take you forever.

Shift chain to outermost rear sprocket (smallest). Shift chain to outermost (largest) chain ring in front.
Test initial inner wire tension. Pedal a normal cadence and shift rear derailleur with one click on lever. Use care to only move lever one position. If derailleur moves one sprocket, tension is adequate.
If derailleur fails to shift one sprocket, inner wire may be too slack. Turn barrel adjuster fully into derailleur body (or shift lever) then turn counter clockwise two turns to allow for index adjustments. Loosen inner wire pinch bolt and gently pull on inner wire with fourth hand tool or pliers to remove slack. Tighten inner wire pinch bolt.
If derailleur will not shift one sprocket after removing slack in "d", return lever back to outermost sprocket position and increase inner wire tension by turning barrel adjuster counter-clockwise 1/4 turn and attempt shift again.
Shift to second sprocket in rear. Pedal and increase inner wire tension by continuing to turn adjusting barrel counter-clockwise until a definite rattling is heard. Rattle is from chain scrapping against next sprocket.
Once a too-tight rattle is achieved, turn barrel adjuster 1/4 turn clockwise, to release inner wire tension, and pedal again. Listen and look for signs of scraping or rattling. Continue turning barrel adjuster 1/4 turn clockwise at a time until rattle disappears.
Shift derailleur one sprocket inward at a time, listening for signs of rattle, indicating a too tight inner wire. Turn adjusting barrel 1/4 turn clockwise to eliminate rattle. Note: Do not attempt shift to largest rear sprocket while in largest front sprocket. This gear is normally not used and adjusting tension to this shift may compromise other commonly used gears.
Shift to innermost (smallest) chain ring and check gears again. If no rattling is present, index adjustment is done.


Shimano "Rapid Rise" or "Low-Normal" Derailleur Indexing Adjustment
Shimano "rapid rise" or "Low-Normal" derailleurs use a return spring that puts the derailleur under the innermost rear sprocket when the inner wire tension is released. As with other indexing derailleurs, the inner wire tension should be set as tight as possible with good shifting. However, the symptoms of a too-tight setting are different, which for "Low-Normal" systems are when the derailleur shifts outward slowly, or a there is a rattle from the upper pulley being aligned too far outward. Look underneath the rear sprocket at the alignment of the upper pulley when there is a rattle to see if this is the cause.

Shift chain to middle ring in front and innermost sprocket in back.
Pedal and shift lever one position.
Pedal and turn barrel adjuster counter-clockwise to tighten inner wire tension until chain begins to shift outward.
Turn barrel adjuster clockwise 1/4 turn until chain runs smoothly on second cog.
Shift outward one sprocket at a time trying each gear. Turn barrel adjuster 1/4 turn clockwise if too tight symptoms occur.
Shift to all other normal gear combinations and test adjustment.

The above directions are from Park Tools web site. They have a fairly comprehensive library of repair info & how-to stuff. www.parktool.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
to go or not to go...

Took it out today to bring it to Clemson Cyclery, and noticed that it was shifting perfectly to all gears now. There is no more noise either... Kinda makes me think it was the front deraileur being off. I fixed that yesterday, and today the rear deraileur seems fine... Should I still bring it to my LBS to have them look it over, or do you think it sorted itself out...?
 

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ride it for a while, and keep testing the shifting. the rear der problems you described sound like a mis-placed cable -- either a housing end that got unseated, an open cable hung up on something, or a cable that got popped out of a guide. That's the sort of thing that you can fix accidentally without even realizing you did anything. If it works now, no worries.

When you get in with the club, there will probably be plenty of folks with the knowledge and willingness to help with stuff like this.

enjoy the riding
 

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Everyone should learn how to adjust/tweak their gears.

Once you think about it very much, it's really a straightforward process, and certainly not brain surgery.

That being said, it's always annoying to get something new home and it not work well.

I'm surprised more shops don't have classes on stuff like this as this has to be more of a nuisance to them than anything else. But not everyone is a fearless do it yourself kind of person.

For me, I'll tackle a bike. But not plumbing or electrical! :D
 

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chicken

MerlinAma said:
For me, I'll tackle a bike. But not plumbing or electrical! :D
What could go wrong? The worst that can happen is you flood the house, or electrocute yourself, or both ;-)

First thing I did when I moved into "this old house" we've been in for 20 years was install a garbage disposal -- plumbing AND electrical, together. In spite of the lack of tech courses I took on the way to my philosophy and law degrees, nothing has blown up yet.

But I don't mean to denigrate your caution.
 

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JCavilia said:
ride it for a while, and keep testing the shifting. the rear der problems you described sound like a mis-placed cable -- either a housing end that got unseated, an open cable hung up on something, or a cable that got popped out of a guide. That's the sort of thing that you can fix accidentally without even realizing you did anything. If it works now, no worries.

When you get in with the club, there will probably be plenty of folks with the knowledge and willingness to help with stuff like this.

enjoy the riding
I agree. for whatever reason, the drivetrain isn't exhibiting the problems it did in your first post, so there's little point in bringing it to the LBS.

The bike being new, there'll come a day (fairly soon if you ride much) that the drivetrain will need smalladjustments made. I agree with the others to try it yourself, because even if you fail miserably there's still the LBS (or this forum) to bail you out.
 

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JCavilia said:
What could go wrong? The worst that can happen is you flood the house, or electrocute yourself, or both ;-).....
After my first few plumbing attempts where I had to call the professional to fix what I'd destoyed, I decided to just call before I spent 3-4 hours busting my knuckles and losing my religion. :D

And I fear electricity as much as snakes or heights. A LOT!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I went out again...

Went out for about a 15 mile ride. Figured it was a good distance to feel out the bike. Took me about 40 minutes, avg. said 22.4. The bike feels great, although I did notice my tires are a bit flat. I love hills with this light (to me) bike! However, the shifting problem came back at about mile 8ish. The right hood came loose on the bars, and I tightened both down just to make sure when I got back. Little side question. How tight is safe for the hoods? Should I crank on the allen wrench, or is too tight bad?

Could the loose hood have been the problem all along and I just never noticed it?

While sprinting across like an intersection, do yall sprint on the hoods, or on the drops?

Because the problem seems to come and go, should I just wait and ask the club guys about it, or should i take it into the LBS? I don't have a car, but the LBS isn't that far (2 miles maybe) should I just bring it in and tell them whats going on and let them have at it?

Also, while going through town on my way back, a car forced me off the curve. They saw me, motioned me to go, so I went, but then they started coming out at me, so I had to jump the curve. I was going about 10mph and landed as soft as I could, but it was pretty rough especially the rear. Just wondering if this could have possibly hurt my Carbon fork and seat-stays? I can only hope that I throw down more force while sprinting than a wimpy 5" curve at 10mph :rolleyes:

All help/suggestions is appreciated!
 

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Nick09 said:
Went out for about a 15 mile ride. Figured it was a good distance to feel out the bike. Took me about 40 minutes, avg. said 22.4. The bike feels great, although I did notice my tires are a bit flat. I love hills with this light (to me) bike! However, the shifting problem came back at about mile 8ish. The right hood came loose on the bars, and I tightened both down just to make sure when I got back. Little side question. How tight is safe for the hoods? Should I crank on the allen wrench, or is too tight bad?

Could the loose hood have been the problem all along and I just never noticed it?

While sprinting across like an intersection, do yall sprint on the hoods, or on the drops?

Because the problem seems to come and go, should I just wait and ask the club guys about it, or should i take it into the LBS? I don't have a car, but the LBS isn't that far (2 miles maybe) should I just bring it in and tell them whats going on and let them have at it?

Also, while going through town on my way back, a car forced me off the curve. They saw me, motioned me to go, so I went, but then they started coming out at me, so I had to jump the curve. I was going about 10mph and landed as soft as I could, but it was pretty rough especially the rear. Just wondering if this could have possibly hurt my Carbon fork and seat-stays? I can only hope that I throw down more force while sprinting than a wimpy 5" curve at 10mph :rolleyes:

All help/suggestions is appreciated!
Answering your questions.. in order:
With CF components torquing to specs is a requirement, but with alu parts tighten until the shifters are secure.

Anything is possible, but I'd highly doubt that a shifter that wasn't loose enough to notice would cause the shifting problems you described.

I ride in the drops 95% of the time, but that doesn't mean you should. Do what's most comfortable and works best for you.

Since you are returning to the thought of bringing the bike to the LBS to get checked out, that may be the best course of action to take, if for no other reason than to give you peace of mind.

Carbon fiber is a very strong, but brittle material, so there's no 'hurting' it. It either maintains it's integrity or it cracks, so check it over carefully and if you see no damage, it's likely you sustained none.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
53T said:
Wow, I've done 15 mile races that did not average much higher than that.

Yea, it's kind of decieving. Lots of long hills. I try to keep it 16.5mph at least on the way up. Fast down. My max speed says 50mph. I'm somewhere between 35 and 40 on almost every downhill. Went on a 25 miler yesterday and the average was 19mph. Same route just longer on the way out.
 

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I recommend you take your bike to the LBS for a complete setup. You also should buy some tools & learn maintenance. There are many you tube vids or you can take a class for this. IMO, you need to calibrate your bike computer. No offense meant, but I don't believe you are riding 15 mi on a hilly route at a +22 mph pace. :rolleyes:
 

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I was told that hoods should be tight enough to not move around but loose enough to move sideways if you crash. Don't want to ruin expensive shifters. Made sense to me. You don't put any weight on them from side to side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How do you calibrate a computer? I set it to the size of the tire, but there is only a very small area where I can put the magnet and sensor because Fuji decided to make an abnormal shaped chain stay. Could the placing of the magnet be the problem?

Also, I tightened the rear derailleur's cable a bit. It seems to be shifting better, not perfect, but much better, and when shifting, the shift lever seems to be more taught. maybe the cable is still settling in?
 

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Nick09 said:
How do you calibrate a computer? I set it to the size of the tire, but there is only a very small area where I can put the magnet and sensor because Fuji decided to make an abnormal shaped chain stay. Could the placing of the magnet be the problem?

Also, I tightened the rear derailleur's cable a bit. It seems to be shifting better, not perfect, but much better, and when shifting, the shift lever seems to be more taught. maybe the cable is still settling in?
If you've followed the instructions for setting tire size, that part has been calibrated. On many of todays bikes with curved/ shaped tubing, some resourcefulness is often necessary to place the sensor and magnet within the 1-2mm's required. If you're unsure of how to install the computer, ask your LBS for assistance.

New bikes almost always need some drivetrain adjustments made after a couple of hundred miles, but I doubt you'd notice the small increase in cable tension at the shifter (unless it started out really slack).
 

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Nick09 said:
Went out for about a 15 mile ride. Figured it was a good distance to feel out the bike. Took me about 40 minutes, avg. said 22.4. The bike feels great, although I did notice my tires are a bit flat.

Yea, it's kind of decieving. Lots of long hills.
So you're a new cyclist and one of your first rides averaged faster than any solo ride I've done in my entire life, and you did it on flat tires with lots of hills? Take your bike back to the shop immediately. There's obviously something wrong with it, like the presence of a built-in motor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Greg Smalter said:
So you're a new cyclist and one of your first rides averaged faster than any solo ride I've done in my entire life, and you did it on flat tires with lots of hills? Take your bike back to the shop immediately. There's obviously something wrong with it, like the presence of a built-in motor.

Chill. Thats just what it told me. I'm going to reset the comp. and re-calibrate it tonight. The tires are not flat, but they don't feel as hard as my tires on my old bike. Maybe the carbon seat stays playing games with my mind? And I said lots of long hills. Not very steep. I'm not very good at judging the grade of a hill, but they certainly are not killer to get up.

But, I'm not new to cycling either. I've been riding a 29 pound 82' Peugeot for about 3 years. I'm definitely not a seasoned veteran, but I wouldn't consider myself "new to cycling". Just new to a new bike... Never had one before, so there will be a lot of noob questions for a while, until I get familiar with all of this new componentry. (Remembering the days of the precise downtube friction shifters :rolleyes5: )
 
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