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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure what section this should go in, but since tools are used for adding/removing components I'll stick it here.

What are some good toolsets to have? The Nashbar site has a short list of 8 items: http://www.nashbar.com/results.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1232&storetype=&estoreid=&init=y

The ParkTool web site has some recommended tools based on needs, but when they throw in their pizza cutter as a need it somewhat discredits their list and makes me wonder what else isn't overly necessary.

So, with that said, who puts together a nice complete toolset. This would initially be for home use, but might expand to a business startup use that I've always had in the back of my mind to somehow sidestep into. Right now I've got a mismatched mixed up set of tools that I've accumulated over the years on an as-needed basis. But people freak when I pick up the 14" monkeywrench and start eyeing their seatbolt. ;)

I know that Campy does or at least did have a huge mechanics set, but it cost more than a new high end bike. ParkTool has a few kits of sorts. Pedros also has some kits put together. I'll be looking at working on everything eventually, from Huffy's to Lightspeeds, and working on Shimano, Campy, SunTour old stock stuff, whatever is currently used on the mass market bikes.

I don't know if one of the "Official" bicycle mechanics schools puts out or publically publishes a mechanics suggested tool list. And I don't see it as a realistic possibility for me to attend one of the certified wrench schools, but I might take a tuneup class at a local dealership this spring/summer, and I might also try and snag a part-time job at one of them as well.

So, list your tools and tool sources.
Thanks in advance.
Mike.
 

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I guess I'm not a kit kinda guy...

IMO buying one of those big kits is the wrong way to go. Either you save some bucks and end up with a box of really cheap tools, or you spend big bucks and get a box full of tools when you only regularly use about half of them.

Buy the tools that you need when you need them. A side benefit is that you'll usually buy the best tool you can afford if you know you're actually going to use it. Park makes some good tools, but not every single item on their list is the best in-category. If you buy quality, and as you need, you'll eventually end up with a toolbox full of stuff that should last a VERY long time :)


treebound said:
Not sure what section this should go in, but since tools are used for adding/removing components I'll stick it here.

What are some good toolsets to have? The Nashbar site has a short list of 8 items: http://www.nashbar.com/results.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1232&storetype=&estoreid=&init=y

The ParkTool web site has some recommended tools based on needs, but when they throw in their pizza cutter as a need it somewhat discredits their list and makes me wonder what else isn't overly necessary.

So, with that said, who puts together a nice complete toolset. This would initially be for home use, but might expand to a business startup use that I've always had in the back of my mind to somehow sidestep into. Right now I've got a mismatched mixed up set of tools that I've accumulated over the years on an as-needed basis. But people freak when I pick up the 14" monkeywrench and start eyeing their seatbolt. ;)

I know that Campy does or at least did have a huge mechanics set, but it cost more than a new high end bike. ParkTool has a few kits of sorts. Pedros also has some kits put together. I'll be looking at working on everything eventually, from Huffy's to Lightspeeds, and working on Shimano, Campy, SunTour old stock stuff, whatever is currently used on the mass market bikes.

I don't know if one of the "Official" bicycle mechanics schools puts out or publically publishes a mechanics suggested tool list. And I don't see it as a realistic possibility for me to attend one of the certified wrench schools, but I might take a tuneup class at a local dealership this spring/summer, and I might also try and snag a part-time job at one of them as well.

So, list your tools and tool sources.
Thanks in advance.
Mike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you

Calvin Jones-Park Tool said:
The PZT-1 was placed on our tool lists a simple offerring, under "Miscellaneous Supplies and Parts". I do not feel it is implied to be a "must have" item. The PZT-1 is not included in any tool kit. For tools in the kit see:
http://www.parktool.com/tools/PK_57.shtml
http://www.parktool.com/tools/AK_32.shtml
and
http://www.parktool.com/tools/BK_2.shtml
My comment was a little tongue in cheek which doesn't always translate too well on the web, sorry about that, but I guess my point was that is was difficult to know without first hand experience what recommended tools were required and which ones were simply nice to have. For example I'd like to have the coffee cup, but it isn't really required unless it's before 9am in the morning. :)

And thanks for the links to the package pages, that's what I was looking for but somehow didn't find on my earlier search. Appreciate it. I'll be making a shopping list and heading down to my nearest LBS listed on your site to check prices and such. When I lived out in California there was a shop in Citrus Heights that stocked most of the tools, hopefully I'll find a similar inventory locally here north of Milwaukee WI.

I'd like to start with a basic setup of bicycle-specific tools, a workstand, and then add individual pieces from there. I already have some good torque wrenches from working on cars and motorcycles including one rated in inch-lbs/neuton-meters, plus a basic set of metric assorted wrenches, so I'm not starting from a zero base which helps some.

Thanks.
Mike.
 

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Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance

Get a copy of this book. There is a chapter in there on what tools you will want and in what order. It is broken down into three categories, from part time home wrench through exotic shop mechanic who can fix any problem with any bike ever made.

As one of the other posters mentions, you get what you pay for with tools. Buy the best you can afford at the you need them, take care of them, and you'll never have to buy them again.

FWIW, I'm in the process of updating my toolbox to do some wrenching of my own and I've found that the non-cycling specific tools, i.e. T-handled hex keys, box end wrenches, and a torque wrench, are less expensive if you go with a regular brand, i.e. Craftsman. Now bike-specific stuff like pedal wrenches, crank pullers and chain whips, you'll probably have to get from Park/Pedros.

Another benefit of buying Craftsman is that they have a lifetime warranty. If you mess up a wrench, take it back to any Sears in the world and they'll replace it, no questions asked.
 

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This months VeloNews has an article titled "Bike Shop in a Box" where they look into some pre-packaged tool boxes offered by Park, Pedros and Performance. The counterpoint at the article's end says it best and says what every ½assed savvy mechanic knows - that pre-packaged tool kits are not the way to go and "from the ground up" is better. That was written by John Barnett of the Institute fame.

After all, what IS the point of a full set of cone wrenches if you have King hubs? Only you know what parts are on your bike and therefore what tools you need.

Buy good tools though and they will last you a lifetime and hold their value. I just sold a couple of tools (Park) on e-bay that I've had for years and I got more for them than what I paid. I got just about present retail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
sounds good

Off to the bike shop or book store tonight or tomorrow for a copy of Velonews.

Thanks for the lead.
 

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I'm not a big fan of tool sets.

I don't think that any company can do a real good job of putting together a tool set for home use. They have two insurmontable problems.

The first is: They don't know what you have either in the way of tools or what equipment is on your bike. As a result, the tool kit they will "recommend" for you is likely to both include a number of tools (like headset wrenches) that you don't need and will never use, and leave out tools (like a Campy lockring tool) that you do need.

The second is: Nobody makes the best of everything. I love my Park tools and the Park tool people have treated me well in the past. But I can think of several individual frequently used tools in which I think other manufacturers have superior products.
 

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My tool set.....

I just took the Park Tool School. The wrench at LBS is really good and recommends various tools from various manufacturers. I.e.

Tools with threads - Park
Cable cutter - Park
Chain Tool - Shimano
Wrenches - Pedros
Torque wrench, sockets, screw drivers, cresent - Craftsman
Misc parts (level, razor blades, tape, awl, rags, etc) Home Depot

I finally broke down and got a big Craftsman rolling tool chest. I'm am SO happy. :)
 
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