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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For many years I have installed many Look Delta and Keo cleats to shoes simply as tight as I can. Now a lot of the cleat hardware come with 3mm hex heads and torque recommendations so I thought I would check my cleats with my low range click-type torque wrench.

I use a 3mm hex head socket but find that it is very easy to strip the bolt head. If I just use a 3mm hex wrench this doesn't happen and I can continue my practice of tightening by feel. I don't have any other issues using this small load torque wrench. It works great for stem bolts and seatpost bolts.

Do others now use a torque wrench to install their cleats? Wonder if anyone has similar experiences.
 

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I do. I use a torque wrench for pretty much anything that has a bolt. I don't have any issues with anything stripping, I use top quality hex bits with my torque wrenches. I get mine from Williams which is a Snap-On company. Bondus is also top notch, not sure if they have bits that fit your wrench or not though. I'm eluding to your bits or rather that 3mm one sucking and having a bad fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do. I use a torque wrench for pretty much anything that has a bolt. I don't have any issues with anything stripping, I use top quality hex bits with my torque wrenches. I get mine from Williams which is a Snap-On company. Bondus is also top notch, not sure if they have bits that fit your wrench or not though. I'm eluding to your bits or rather that 3mm one sucking and having a bad fit.
I think you may be right about the bits. Mine are 3/8" drive Craftsman and my torque wrench is a 1/4" drive so I also have a 1/4-3/8 adapter in the mix. My torque wrench starts at 20 in lbs. and is about 10 inches long. I just feel that I never reach the click when I try it on the bolts that come with my Keos. Almost like the torque wrench is too long for working on a 3mm hex head. As I said, never a problem on stem/bar and seatpost/saddle bolts.
 

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I use one of the ubiquitous 5Nm torque keys (Trek supplies them with their higher end CF bikes). If the end of the hex bit has a significant chamfer, I gently grind it down flat to maximize the engagement with the shallow socket of the cleat screw. It's more critical on mtb spd cleats as the shoe can get pretty stuck on the pedal of the cleat can rotate.
 

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I use a torque wrench for everything including cleats. Better safe than sorry.
 

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For many years I have installed many Look Delta and Keo cleats to shoes simply as tight as I can. Now a lot of the cleat hardware come with 3mm hex heads and torque recommendations so I thought I would check my cleats with my low range click-type torque wrench.

I use a 3mm hex head socket but find that it is very easy to strip the bolt head. If I just use a 3mm hex wrench this doesn't happen and I can continue my practice of tightening by feel. I don't have any other issues using this small load torque wrench. It works great for stem bolts and seatpost bolts.

Do others now use a torque wrench to install their cleats? Wonder if anyone has similar experiences.
I use the Park beam torque wrench to install Look cleats. I shoot for 30-35inch-lbs
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Still think the 3mm bit is probably my problem but now I have begun to doubt my torque wrench and will have some trepidation when using it for 5Nm on a carbon seatpost bolt. My wrench is a 1/4" drive Pittsburgh Pro click-type from Harbor Freight Tools. 20-200 inch lbs.

Does anyone know of the best way to test the wrench on a heavy duty fastener or something? Just want to know it still clicks out at final torque. Guess I have lost confidence in it.
 

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Still think the 3mm bit is probably my problem but now I have begun to doubt my torque wrench and will have some trepidation when using it for 5Nm on a carbon seatpost bolt. My wrench is a 1/4" drive Pittsburgh Pro click-type from Harbor Freight Tools. 20-200 inch lbs.

Does anyone know of the best way to test the wrench on a heavy duty fastener or something? Just want to know it still clicks out at final torque. Guess I have lost confidence in it.
Do you know someone who has another one you can compare it to by feel?

If in doubt, it's best to err on the side of caution when torquing against carbon.

With something like cleats, as long as you're in the neighborhood, you're fine. My cleats call for 5Nm, but as long as you don't go over 7Nm, you're not in danger of stripping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was able to torque my cleat screws to 30 inlbs, and I hear the torque wrench click. I need to be up around 5-5.5 Nms though. It does seem that my problem is the small 3mm hex head and the fact that I am using a 1/4" to 3/8" adapter with my 1/4" drive torque wrench and 3/8" drive 3mm hex socket. This causes the torque wrench to be to far removed from the fastener and introduces some unwanted side to side motion.

Further tested my wrench with 5mm chainring bolts and seat rail fasteners without a problem, so I have regained confidence in my torque wrench. I suspect that if I used the 4mm bolts that came with my shoes that the hex head interface would be better supported and the torque would work correctly. Obviously I would be better off if my torque wrench was 3/8" drive.
 
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